Broadcasting Allocations

June 7th, 2014 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

The has released its funding decisions for . Sadly political parties are banned in law by being able to purchase broadcast advertisements. The get allocated an amount by the Commission, who have $3.2 million for this purpose.

The criteria the Commission use are:

  • Party and electorate votes at the last election
  • Votes at any by-elections since
  • No of current MPs
  • Any alliances (Mana-Internet)
  • Polls
  • Membership
  • Fair opportunities

I’ve done a little table showing the amount allocated to the main parties, and comparing it to their party vote last time, and the average in the public polls since the election (up until when the Commission met).

broadalloc

These are not the only two criteria, but it is interesting to look at the results. Based on vote at the last elections National and Conservatives get a $1 per vote. Labour, Greens and NZ First $1.36 to $1.62 and the smaller parties $3 to $5. This is pretty standard that the smaller parties get proportionally a bit more.

In terms of dollars per average % in the polls, National gets $23,000 per %, Labour $28,000, Greens $33,000, Conservatives $38,000 and NZ First 38,000.

 

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21 Responses to “Broadcasting Allocations”

  1. redqueen (519 comments) says:

    I don’t watch telly. Can I have my money back?

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  2. jp_1983 (200 comments) says:

    whats to stop a party using youtube and facebook videos to campaign?
    is there a limit?

    [DPF: Nothing. They are not counted as broadcasting]

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  3. jcuknz (704 comments) says:

    Me too! :)

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  4. PaulL (5,983 comments) says:

    Interesting that the right seems likely to be similar or higher than the left in aggregate vote, but in funding terms are lower. Seems like creating multiple parties would pay off.

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  5. bringbackdemocracy (414 comments) says:

    Some parties are getting more than they should and others not enough.
    e.g Conservatives get $60,207 and Brendon Horan $76,930
    How does that work????

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  6. Floyd60 (90 comments) says:

    Yes, the ‘membership’ criteria would be an illuminating addition to this table.

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  7. Nuwanda (83 comments) says:

    DPF said:

    “Sadly political parties are banned in law by being able to purchase broadcast advertisements.”

    What a strange word to use, “sadly”. Or do you mean it’s sad that National having been in power for the best part of six years and supposedly being an advocate of free markets (well, let’s pretend) has not seen fit to address this affront to freedom of speech which is a direct violation of the NZ Bill of Rights. Even worse, it requires me to pay for the broadcasting of political views that I find abhorrent.

    Sad? It’s not a force of nature. It can be changed. National obviously thinks it furnishes them some advantage.

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  8. Keeping Stock (10,170 comments) says:

    Can anyone explain how Ben from The Civilian gets $33k for what is essentially a joke party? Welcome to a preview of taxpayer funded political parties…

    http://keepingstock.blogspot.co.nz/2014/06/wtf.html?m=0

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  9. twofish (82 comments) says:

    Taxpayer funding for party political broadcasts during this year’s election campaign:
    • National: $1.05m
• Labour: $919,829
 • Greens: $401,380 
• NZ First: $200,690 
• Maori Party: $100,345 
• Act: $76,930 
• Internet Mana: $76,930
 • United Future: $76,930
• Conservative: $60,207
    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/politics/news/article.cfm?c_id=280&objectid=11269245

    Question… Is the Internet Mana, registered yet, and if not how does it receive an allocation?

    Registered parties are listed here, both Mana and Internet showing component parties as NONE –
    http://www.elections.org.nz/parties-candidates/registered-political-parties/register-political-parties

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  10. spanish_tudor (56 comments) says:

    How come the funding allocations for National and Labour are only $150k or so in difference? After Labour got their arse handed to them on a plate in 2008, and have barely moved in the polls since then?

    Or do Labour’s shadowy ‘affiliated members’ bump up their membership figures, thereby increasing their funding?

    Or does it come under the ‘fair opportunities’ criterion? Sounds like another bullshit socialist con job to me.

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  11. Pete George (23,299 comments) says:

    The whole list:

    The New Zealand National Party (National Party) $1,053,622
    The New Zealand Labour Party (Labour Party) $919,829
    The Green Party of Aotearoa/New Zealand (Green Party) $401,380
    New Zealand First (NZ First) $200,690
    Māori Party $100,345
    ACT New Zealand (ACT Party) $76,930
    Internet Party and MANA Movement (Internet MANA) $76,930
    United Future New Zealand (United Future) $76,930
    New Zealand Independent Coalition (NZIC) $76,930
    Conservative Party of New Zealand (Conservative Party) $60,207
    The Alliance (Alliance) $33,635
    Aotearoa Legalise Cannabis Party (ALCP) $33,635
    The Civilian Party (Civilian) $33,635
    The Expatriate Party of New Zealand (Expat Party) $33,635
    Focus New Zealand (Focus NZ) $33,635
    The New Zealand Democratic Party for Social Credit (Democrats for Social Credit) $33,635
    Truth, Freedom, Justice $33,635
    Radio New Zealand (RNZ) $4,012

    Total allocated $3,283,250

    Some of these aren’t registered yet so won’t get their allocation unless they register by 14 August.

    The process for determining the broadcasting allocation is set out in Part 6 of the Broadcasting Act 1989. A party is only eligible for the broadcasting allocation if:

    (a) the party is registered on the Register of Political Parties by 14 August 2014 (the date for dissolution of Parliament), and

    (b) the party has given notice to the Electoral Commission that the party considers itself to be qualified for an allocation by the date required by the Electoral Commission (the deadline was 17 March 2014).

    The Electoral Commission must allocate the time provided by TVNZ and RNZ and the money appropriated by Parliament to eligible parties in accordance with the statutory criteria, which are:

    (a) the number of persons who voted at the preceding general election for a party and its candidates;

    (b) the number of persons who voted at any by-election held since the preceding general election for any candidate for the party;

    (c) the number of members of Parliament who were members of a political party immediately before the expiration or dissolution of Parliament;

    (d) any relationships that exist between one political party and another party;

    (e) any other indications of public support for a political party such as the results of opinion polls and the number of persons who are members of the party;

    (f) the need to provide a fair opportunity for each registered political party to convey its policies to the public by the broadcasting of election programmes on television.

    The Commission may vary the allocation decision under certain circumstances provided for in the Broadcasting Act 1989, including, for example, if a party fails to register as a registered political party by 14 August 2014.

    http://www.elections.org.nz/news-media/2014-broadcasting-allocation-decision-released

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  12. projectman (206 comments) says:

    Since when was Radio New Zealand (officially) a political party?

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  13. Peter (1,663 comments) says:

    The Civilian should hand our taxpayer money back. We have enough joke parties collecting taxpayer funds as it is.

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  14. ross411 (291 comments) says:

    Do they have to account for their spending? If they don’t spend it on broadcasting, do they get to pocket it (i.e. Winston Peters/Matt McCarten it) or do they have to return it?

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  15. G152 (228 comments) says:

    Since when was Radio New Zealand (officially) a political party?

    Since they are part of the Left afflicted Main Stream Media

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  16. G152 (228 comments) says:

    Since when was Radio New Zealand (officially) a political party?

    As they are a part of the Left leaning MSM they should be treated as such !

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  17. ObligatoryMarxist (36 comments) says:

    Actual question, DPF if you know the answer;

    With you saying youtube doesn’t count as broadcasting, does that include paid ads on Youtube? I can understand if just putting up a youtube video doesn’t count, since you have to -want- to click on the link to see it, but with the paid ads on youtube? Would that count as broadcasting expenses?

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  18. ObligatoryMarxist (36 comments) says:

    Also, can private TV channels set the cost of advertising on their channel, or is that set by the EC? If not, can they charge one party more than another?

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  19. questions (186 comments) says:

    So National gets about 15% more than Labour, seems fair to me. Hopefully the Electoral Commission gave them a stern note reminding them to pay GST this time!

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  20. OneTrack (2,804 comments) says:

    “whats to stop a party using youtube and facebook videos to campaign?
    is there a limit?”

    Excellent, so there is no need for the taxpayer to fund any broadcasting allocation now, as everybody has the InterWeb.

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  21. Changeiscoming (158 comments) says:

    This broadcasting allocation is so broken and biased it is almost too shocking for words. And to think it is all tax payer money and the parties can’t even spend more if they want too. Totally and utterly broken.

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