The Queen’s Birthday Honours List 2014

June 2nd, 2014 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

The official list is here.

ONZ

Sir Ronald Powell Carter, KNZM, of Auckland. For services to New Zealand.

DNZM

The Honourable Susan Gwynfa Mary Glazebrook, of Wellington. For services to the judiciary.

The Honourable Lowell Patria Goddard, QC, of Wellington. For services to the law.

Ms Patricia Lee Reddy, of Wellington. For services to the arts and business.

KNZM

Mr Graeme Seton Avery, ONZM, of Hastings. For services to business and sport.

Mr Richard John Hayes, MNZM, of Te Anau. For services to Search and Rescue and the community.

Dr John Antony Hood, of Shipton Under Wychwood, United Kingdom. For services to tertiary education.

Mr Robert John Stewart, ONZM, of Christchurch. For services to manufacturing and the community.

Stuff reports:

Engineering supremo Sir Ron Carter has joined New Zealand’s most elite club, courtesy of the Queen’s Birthday .

Carter has been made a member of the Order of New Zealand, the country’s highest honour, which recognises outstanding service to the country and its people.

It is limited to 20 living members and with Carter’s addition there are now 17.

Carter, who was knighted for his service to engineering in 1998, is recognised in today’s honours for his contribution to infrastructure planning, governance, business and education.

His name is synonymous with Beca, a company that was tiny when he joined in 1959, but which became a major engineering force with its involvement in projects such as the Tiwai Pt aluminium smelter, the Tasman Pulp and Paper Mill, and the Sky Tower.

He has served on the royal commission inquiring into the Christchurch earthquakes, chaired the Committee for Auckland, which laid the groundwork for the Auckland Council, and created a consortium in Auckland that helped position iwi as significant investors.

Today’s honours include three new dames and four knights.

Two of the dames are judges. Justice Susan Glazebrook, who serves on the Supreme Court bench and has served on many international human rights and law bodies, is honoured for her services to the judiciary.

Justice Lowell Goddard, who chaired the Independent Police Conduct Authority from 2007-12, is recognised for services to the law.

The other dame is Film Commission chairwoman Patsy Reddy, who is also deputy chairwoman of the New Zealand Transport Agency and chief Crown negotiator for Treaty settlements in Bay of Plenty. Her award is for services to the arts and business.

Knighthoods have gone to helicopter pilot Richard Hayes, businessman and sports administrator Graeme Avery, education leader John Hood and manufacturer Robert Stewart.

Hayes, from Te Anau, is one of the country’s best-known helicopter pilots, and is honoured with a knighthood for his services to the search and rescue movement and to the community.

Avery’s award recognises his services to business and sport. He has been involved with athletics for more than 40 years and with exports for more than 50 years through his former medical publishing business Adis International and his wine business Sileni Estates.

Hood is knighted for his services to tertiary education. The University of Auckland vice-chancellor from 1999 to 2004, he strengthened research throughout the institution during his time in charge and set up a new business school. He is president and chief executive of the Robertson Foundation in New York.

Stewart, the founder of Skope Industries which manufactures low energy commercial refrigerators that are exported around the world, is recognised for his services to manufacturing and the community. He has chaired the Health Research Council since 2002 and is well known for his philanthropic deeds in Canterbury.

Good to see someone who is not a politician appointed to the Order of New Zealand. Of their 17 members, seven are former or current politicians.

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21 Responses to “The Queen’s Birthday Honours List 2014”

  1. tvb (4,422 comments) says:

    This bi-annual parade of worthies scrambling after their bits of tin and cloth makes my heart sink. There are far too many people getting knighthoods and Dames. There should be one or two a year at most. Some years there should be none. There must be hundreds of them around now.

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  2. Longknives (4,744 comments) says:

    Darren Shand? For what?? Carrying the bags and calling the lawyers every time one of his players gets arrested?

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  3. Ben2001 (26 comments) says:

    It really is time this anachronistic, forelock tugging nonsense was scrapped. Another bunch of time servers.

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  4. jp_1983 (213 comments) says:

    The dom post editorial has sour grapes this morning.

    Instead of congratulating people they are bagging the whole process. Maybe their honor got lost in the post

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  5. stephieboy (3,064 comments) says:

    I think the bestowing of honours in this kind of way is reducing to an archaic irrelevancy albeit a quaint and harmless one. The problem is the general public will tend to treat it with contempt and blithely ignore.
    Awards should be made special through scarcity for very special people who’ve made a most special contribution in enhancing the lives of our community and nation.

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  6. Paulus (2,627 comments) says:

    There appear to be too many “Community Awards”.
    Nice people I am sure but……………….

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  7. stephieboy (3,064 comments) says:

    Honors bestowed on the likes of Sir Edmund,Sir Peter Blake and Dame Kiri should be the benchmark not the judiciary , sports,film,TV or media celebs etc.

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  8. MT_Tinman (3,186 comments) says:

    Unless some of these awards come with a stipend I see no harm in them at all.

    The more the merrier – if only to keep the business card printing industry in work.

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  9. Chuck Bird (4,883 comments) says:

    It will soon be Sir Winston and John Key will be happy to put his name forward.

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  10. Jack5 (5,137 comments) says:

    And the Hooerald in an editorial today opines:

    A recurring criticism of this country is that it fails to acknowledge the importance of its business leaders. Too often, that judgment has been underlined by the scant attention paid to their contribution in lists of national honours.

    Nonsense! Business people’s prime measure of success is the amount of money they make for themselves, or for their shareholders, or for both. When they function well they benefit the country and create jobs and consumer wealth.

    State awards for business people are as likely to be for political support as for business success.

    The country needs New Zealanders like Gates and Ford, Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore, Akio Morita and Soichiro Honda, not colonial knights and dames.

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  11. Akaroa (557 comments) says:

    It really is time this sad anachronism was finally put to bed.

    That’s not to denigrate the recipients of honours, I’m sure that they are all lovely people who have never uttered a cross word or had a mean thought in their lives – but one asks oneself, “What’s the point?”

    Does anyone really know?. I’m asking seriously!.

    (And, in case you wondered, I’m a seventy-something two-Air Force veteran with a modest row of medals after serving my country(ies) in a few of the less salubrious of the World’s hot-spots)

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  12. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Akaroa
    Did you regard your own honours as something of an anachronism?

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  13. Unity (584 comments) says:

    I have always said that the only reason John Key brought the Honours System back (one of the first things he did in 2008) was because he wants one for himself!! I’ll bet it’s on his bucket list.

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  14. gump (1,647 comments) says:

    @Jack5

    “Nonsense! Business people‚Äôs prime measure of success is the amount of money they make for themselves, or for their shareholders, or for both. When they function well they benefit the country and create jobs and consumer wealth.”

    —————————-

    That’s not entirely true. A number of NZ manufacturers have closed their local operations and relocated offshore. While perfectly legitimate and understandable as a business strategy, it doesn’t benefit the country or create jobs.

    I have a lot of respect for the business leaders who create meaningful and sustainable employment for their fellow New Zealanders.

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  15. Jack5 (5,137 comments) says:

    Gump (12.00):

    Many of the manufacturers would not have had to move offshore if NZ had sane currency management, along the lines of Singapore and Switzerland. Our bureaucrats are basically not bright enough for that, unfortunately.

    However, to your point. There have been knighthoods, too, for business leaders who have moved their interests overseas, or unnecessarily sold out to overseas companies. Our two large breweries are/were good examples. Quite a few knighthoods were bestowed on these beer barons. What economic or business-efficiency advantage came from foreign ownership of these businesses?

    And what of Brierley? He threw buckets of petrol on to Schumacher’s creative destruction, and made a fortune out of it basically because outdated accounting standards didn’t require current valuations of assets. I think Brierley had already left the country when he received his knightbood. Bit like knighting Dick Turpin, IMHO.

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  16. gump (1,647 comments) says:

    @Jack5

    I don’t think Brierley deserved his knighthood, and I know of others who have been honoured for similarly dubious ‘achievements’.

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  17. Jack5 (5,137 comments) says:

    Wonder what are the Greens’ and Mana-Dotcom’s positions on knighthoods and dames?

    What would the big fellow be? Sir Dot or Sir Dotcom?

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  18. Akaroa (557 comments) says:

    Milkenmild, at 11.32 in response to mine at 11.27 asked:

    “……Did you regard your own honours as something of an anachronism?….”

    Well Milkenmild, the medals I sport are not, in the true sense, ‘honours’. They are campaign medals – except, perhaps, for a ‘Mention in Despatches’ Oak Leaf that I was awarded to go with my Northern Ireland campaign medal after my twelve months in Belfast.

    And, to answer your query, no, I don’t think that campaign medals are an anachronism. They are an acknowledgement that the recipient has put his life on the line in some way or another in the national interest. A lot of servicemen do so quite regularly you know!! (Afghanistan anyone?)

    As for Queens Birthday awards, I have no quarrel with those worthy souls who, for example, beaver away in some obscure Government office for x years and are finally rewarded with a minor honour. In many instances society – or whatever- would be the poorer were it not for their loyal and lengthy contribution to society. And good on them for having their moment in the sunshine of public acknowledgement.

    But its just the ‘grocery list’ or ‘Buggins’ turn’ nature of the Birthday honours that I find a bit underwhelming. And the fact that, in the Public service, time in certain posts more or less guarantees an award. (Sit at your desk long enough and keep your nose clean and the routine honour will automatically come along!)

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  19. edhunter (546 comments) says:

    ONZ limited to 20 living people? Then what are the 8 additional members? Chopped Liver?
    I’m all for recognising the contributions these people have made but you either increase the total to say 30 living members or create a new order or two.

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  20. tvb (4,422 comments) says:

    Or better still scrap the thing entirely. It has become a font of honour for retired politicians we are utterly tired of including that Labour Party gargoyle Jonathan Hunt.

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  21. altiora (279 comments) says:

    @ Akaroa. I think mikenmild’s point is that asserting something is “anachronistic” and needs to be got rid of opens us younger people to go around saying “this is anachronistic, that is anachronstic, so let’s abolish them”. I find the anachronistic mantra to be infuriatingly unthinking and lazy. I am also suspicious of it when it’s uttered by Marxist-inspired leftists, who use it as a battling ram to remove anything and everything that is an historical element of Pakeha culture. Apparently, Pakeha Tikanga isn’t worthy of respect. Yet they somehow think that Maori Tikanga is (and I’d agree with that largely). I’ve never been able work out how they manage to be so contradictory, but I guess being contradictory is the luxury of being a leftist.

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