Who have the parties selected in seats they currently hold?

June 16th, 2014 at 10:00 am by David Farrar

I thought it would be interesting to look at who has been selected as new by political parties in seats they currently hold. The selections are:

National

  1. Bay of Plenty – Todd Muller, former Fonterra Group Director, Apata Chief Executive and Zespri General Manager
  2. Clutha-Southland – Todd Barclay, former ministerial staffer and Corporate Affairs Manager for Philip Morris
  3. Hunua – Andrew Bayly, charted accountant, merchant banker, company chair, former British Parachute regiment, dragged a sled to the South Pole
  4. Invercargill – Sarah Dowie, lawyer, former DOC manager, deputy chair of a conservation trust
  5. Kaikoura – Stuart Smith, wine grower, former Chair NZ Winegrowers, Chair of an irrigation scheme
  6. Napier – Wayne Walford, CEO HB Chamber of Commerce and previously Waikato Chamber of Commerce
  7. Taranaki-King County – Barbara Kuriger, farmer, 2012 Dairy Woman of the Year, Director of DairyNZ
  8. Waimakariri – Matthew Doocey, Canterbury DHB Manager, Healthcare manager
  9. Wairarapa – Alastair Scott, wine maker, Chairman of a cage free egg farm, Irrigation trustee, Transpower director, charity trustee
  10. Whangarei – Shane Reti, medical practitioner, Harkness Fellowship to Harvard, Northland DHB member

Labour

  1. Kelston – Carmel Sepuloni, CEO of a Pacific NGO supporting diabled and elderly, forrmer teacher
  2. Manukau East – Jenny Salesa, policy analyst, Chair of a Tongan Youth Trust

Maori Party

  1. Tamaki Makaurau – Rangi McLean, winner NZ Maori Business Award, public health adviser,
  2. Te Tai Hauauru – Chris McKenzie, former ministerial staffer, treaty negotiator, education manager, teacher

ACT

  1. Epsom – David Seymour, former think tank staffer, ministerial staffer

The 10 new National Electorate MPs (if they retain the seats) are a good variety of business, health, law, conservation and agriculture in my opinion.

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14 Responses to “Who have the parties selected in seats they currently hold?”

  1. Judith (8,534 comments) says:

    WOW – that really points out the differences, doesn’t it?

    Business men, bankers, company directors are over represented in National. Very few people who actually have experience of working with the majority of New Zealanders from anything other than an employer (superior) position.

    The rest – all ‘people persons’ – but very little business experience and probably couldn’t balance their own cheque accounts.

    In short, it points out how ill prepared any of the parties are. We need a strong party that is made up of people from all walks of life. One that is able to provide a balanced perspective and from experience cater for the needs of all in society but that can also run the business end of governance in an efficient manner.

    Sadly, there is no single party on offer that even comes close.

    Good to see National returning so many to their original electorates – I wonder where all the newbies will go ?

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  2. Chris2 (762 comments) says:

    The lack of turnover in Labour-held seats is staggering.

    Really, what do the likes of Trevor Mallard and Phil Goff have left to offer voters after all these decades?

    I know they would struggle to find meaningful employment commensurate with what they are paid now, and that will be their sole motivation for staying on, but it reflects poorly on Labour that they allow tired old party hacks to occupy safe Labour seats.

    At the very least Labour could have put them on the List only, in the lower middle order, to make them actually work to get back in.

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  3. Judith (8,534 comments) says:

    @ Chris2 (730 comments) says:
    June 16th, 2014 at 10:14 am

    Really? Never underestimate the value of experience. There needs to be a balance between both new and old – because after all, that is what society is made up of, and voters generally support those they can most associate themselves with.

    Look at Lockwood Smith – he offered and provided a great deal of mana to National. It’s a pity he was put out to pasture, because I believe he is still needed to provide that important balance.

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  4. dime (9,849 comments) says:

    Lol always great to see the qualifications laid out.

    Kills me that nasty Carmel woman will get back in.

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  5. Chris2 (762 comments) says:

    Judith, both Mallard and Goff were senior Ministers in a Government that was overwhelmingly rejected by the voters, and they must take some responsibility for that.

    And then later Goff, was himself rejected as Leader by his own Party.

    It’s time these two men realised they have had their chance, they have been resoundingly rejected, and its time to let someone else have a go.

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  6. greenjacket (459 comments) says:

    With the exception of Deborah Roche, I was surprised at the lack of talent amongst the new crop of Labour candidates. In the past Labour and National worked hard to shoulder-tap very capable people in business and the professions to get them on board. So either Labour are no longer identifying able people and asking them to join up (which I regard as a fairly basic role of party organisation), or else that cohort of business people and professionals have turned their backs on Labour. Either way, it means that Labour will be going into future elections will be lacking people in the caucus who have the management and leadership skills to form an alternative government.

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  7. Linda Reid (413 comments) says:

    Judith – the vast majority of people who get to a ‘superior’ position in business have got there through doing the hard yards and working from a much lower position – or they have taken the risk of starting their own business. So – generally plenty of time working with NZers from all backgrounds. They would have the skills and attitude to make a contribution – far more so than someone who went straight from university to the public tit.

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  8. backster (2,150 comments) says:

    ” lawyer, former DOC manager, deputy chair of a conservation trust”………Doesn’t appeal much.

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  9. Harriet (4,848 comments) says:

    The Labour and Maori party ones are all publicly funded in their day jobs. Business as usual for NZ Inc under the left.

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  10. Keeping Stock (10,291 comments) says:

    If he happens to win Tamaki Makaurau, Rangi McLean is going to have the honour of having the best moko in Parliament; it’s fearsome!

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  11. RRM (9,826 comments) says:

    WOW – that really points out the differences, doesn’t it?

    Business men, bankers, company directors competent high-achivers who have risen to the top of their respective fields and know how to make stuff happen are over represented in National.

    The rest – all ‘people persons’ policy analysts, career unionists and generally just pallid little ideological wonks being elevated one step above their level of capability – but very little business experience and probably couldn’t balance their own cheque accounts.

    In short, it points out how ill prepared any of the parties are why RRM has become a National voter.

    Fixed that for you, Judith ;-)

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  12. jhanet (11 comments) says:

    backster – Dowie is the much more appealing choice for Invercargill once you see who’s she up against … Labour’s dull, solitary pro-lifer and unpopular in her own party ‘proud feminist, socialist and trade unionist’ Lesley Soper. Me thinks Labour has given up on ever winning Invercargill back.

    Also good to see Dowie running a strong, full-on campaign for National in Invercargill for once, with predecessor Eric Roy having been largely invisible during the election campaigns apart from meetings and a few billboards. Never ever saw him pounding the pavements or at many events.

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  13. big bruv (13,718 comments) says:

    So a pay rise for those selected in the Labour seats and a pay drop for those selected in the National party seats.

    I trust MP’s who enter parliament on a reduced income to do what is best for NZ far more than those bludging parasites (who have never had a real job in their life) who look upon a seat in the house as a pay rise.

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  14. BlairM (2,320 comments) says:

    In my opinion, what makes a good, effective MP is being a political activist outside of Parliament. That is what made Sue Bradford so effective when she was there (unfortunately). It also helped David Garrett a great deal.

    People who are “in business” but not politically active tend to do badly, or averagely. John Key has been a glaring exception, but mostly because being a currency trader is a high-risk enterprise. But take Richard Worth for example. He had a stellar career outside of Parliament. But once there, he was rather ordinary. There is a great lack of acknowledgement that the skills required to be effective in business/the private sector are completely different from those required in politics. And yet we still have people dutifully and sincerely advocate for candidates “because they are successful businesspeople”. There is not necessarily a correlation.

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