Disadvantaged youth doing better

July 3rd, 2014 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

The Government’s flagship youth welfare programme is making significant inroads toward lifting educational achievement, a new report has found.

The best results were achieved when teens on the Ministry of Social Development’s youth services programme achieved NCEA level two in their first 12 months.

The numbers were not so good when the 16 and 17-year-olds were trying to achieve that level after being enrolled for longer than a year.

The programme involves providers working directly with about 3000 young people who are on benefits, or unemployed and not receiving any education or training.

Among its goals is for youth to “not be on a benefit or receive a custodial sentence” for three months after the end of their school year or training course.

The young people involved must participate in education, training or work-based learning and budgeting, and are given little control their benefit.

The ministry will release its first evaluation of the programme today. An early copy shows two-thirds of the teens had made marked strides in education, leaving school with at least a NCEA level two qualification.

I don’t think you can over-estimate the importance of the improvements being made here. This is the stuff that will make a huge difference in 15 to 20 years time.

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11 Responses to “Disadvantaged youth doing better”

  1. Odakyu-sen (440 comments) says:

    We should identify those responsible for “disadvantaging” these youths, and deal to them soundly.

    //

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  2. Sporteone (17 comments) says:

    I know this may not have much to do with this topic, but I recently visited the Vanguard College, yes its a charter school, several weeks ago and was very impressed with the progress that most of the students have made. The one young guy who I was visiting had a learning difficulty and was not catered for in the main stream system. He had been to a number of private schools and main stream and was well behind everyone else.

    Now he is getting the attention he needs, has progressed immensely and now loves school. This young kids was going to leave school and just bum around. He now has a future and is looking at a building apprenticeship, thanks to Vanguard.

    Many of the kids there, both male and female were not doing well at school and now everything has changed. And no, we just didn’t see the kids who were doing well. It was not a put on display.

    These kids now have a direction in life and look at their instructors as someone they can respect and look up to. Many of the kids were unfit and overweight, but now they have lost that weight and are very fit.

    This is an example of things that can happen, when the effort is put into the kids of today, who by the way are not getting into trouble like they used to, because the school takes responsibility.

    Pity a few of our troubled teens don’t go to these schools.

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  3. RRM (9,445 comments) says:

    The programme involves providers working directly with about 3000 young people who are on benefits, or unemployed and not receiving any education or training.

    Among its goals is for youth to “not be on a benefit or receive a custodial sentence” for three months after the end of their school year or training course.

    :neutral: Wow. Aim high, eh?

    We think you’re A SUCCESS if you can stay out of jail for 3 months.

    And apparently there are enough of them to warrant a Government programme.

    Perhaps these low expectations – that make it conceivable that we should provide “systems” to “support” people who are “at risK” of becoming the thieving criminal scum of the fucking earth – are part of the PROBLEM, not part of the SOLUTION?

    I can’t speak for other towns, but I’ve lost count of the number of Concerned Citizens’ meetings there have been in he ANZAC Hall in Featherston in the last two years, attended by the Mayor & Corporation, in which people have vented their frustration at the Police’s UTTER INABILITY to catch and prosecute rampant thieves that are ruining people’s lives. And the Mayor has had little to offer beyond “the police have assured me everything will get better soon.”

    My neighbour has been burgled twice, our best friends have chased shitbag “at-risk youth” out of their yard in the small hours several times, and our other best friend had rocks thrown at her house while she was nursing her baby.

    My personal view is that THIS TREE

    https://www.google.co.nz/maps/@-41.117595,175.327012,3a,55.5y,59.49h,89.81t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sPbRLnQdOr3CP0mCWjiIw-A!2e0

    on the main street of Featherston would make an excellent gibbet for informal executions. We the people would only need to catch one shitbag thief in the act, lop his head off with an axe, and hang the remains up on this tree with a placard “dirty fucking thief” hanging from his neck stump.

    Just one… and the message would spread like wildfire among the underworld and the tits-on-a-bull useless New Zealand Police alike. People are just fucking over it. Civilised people still outnumber scum and cops in this country.

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  4. wikiriwhis business (3,883 comments) says:

    Ok, so here’s the reality.

    youth are only going into debt trying to educate themselves.

    Compulsory military training should be adapted along with trade certs and diploma’s.

    Boot camps should also be training youth inmates along these lines.

    The reason these skull duggery govts won’t is because there will be no youth debt ascribed to these programmes.

    We are being run by the bankster Mobsters.

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  5. wikiriwhis business (3,883 comments) says:

    RRM is simply a simple fascist.

    Trade training programmes that don’t run youth into debt.

    Public stocks for recidivists.

    Death penalty for eye witness murders

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  6. thor42 (915 comments) says:

    This is a good start but there is LOTS more that could be done.

    Top priority – phase out the DPB (or whatever it’s called now). As of date “x”, no new applications accepted.
    At the same time – stop welfare benefits for anyone under 20 ( the only possible exception being the “EUB” that students get over summer if they are unable to get a holiday job. At least they are studying. )
    Next – axe Working for Families.
    As soon as possible – axe Women’s Affairs, Te Puni Kokiri, the Human Rights Commission and the Children’s Commission. All of them are a complete waste of time and money.

    Do all of these things and see the hundreds of millions of dollars in savings roll in, year after year.

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  7. Judith (7,591 comments) says:

    Odakyu-sen (417 comments) says:
    July 3rd, 2014 at 1:04 pm
    We should identify those responsible for “disadvantaging” these youths, and deal to them soundly.

    Well said!

    This is still ambulance at the bottom of the hill stuff. Still applying a plaster to a wound that should never have been created. IT is still providing an ‘out’ to parents who don’t do their job properly, and to families that fail to care for their own.

    When such programs are no longer needed, then a government has reason to skite. Until then, crowing over perpetuating the problem by providing even more reasons for parents not to raise their children properly, is not really an achievement, no matter how ‘good’ it looks on paper.

    Come back in ten years and tell me the goals have been maintained, and I’ll congratulate those responsible. But one year is nothing in these teens lives. The vast majority of habitual beneficiaries and criminals have had at least two year terms of employment etc at some stage in their lives.

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  8. thor42 (915 comments) says:

    @Judith – “Still applying a plaster to a wound that should never have been created.”

    I agree wholeheartedly, and the creator of said wound (in the vast majority of cases) was Labour with their massive welfare programs (the latest of which is Working for Families). The DPB was created by Norm Kirk’s Labour government in 1973.

    It has fallen to National to do the difficult “hard yards”, trying to keep young people out of the welfare system. As I mentioned previously, they still have a long way to go, but at least they are making some progress. The only thing Labour is interested in is creating more “vote fodder” by expanding the welfare system and making even more people dependent on government handouts, “perpetuating the problem by providing even more reasons for parents not to raise their children properly.”

    It is to National’s shame that they have not phased out the DPB and Working for Families.

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  9. wikiriwhis business (3,883 comments) says:

    ‘We should identify those responsible for “disadvantaging” these youths, and deal to them soundly. ”

    Reserve bank and their political parties

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  10. wikiriwhis business (3,883 comments) says:

    ‘Do all of these things and see the hundreds of millions of dollars in savings roll in, year after year.”

    It’ll just go into beehive trougher perks and white elephant roading nightmares

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  11. Judith (7,591 comments) says:

    @ thor42 (872 comments) says:
    July 3rd, 2014 at 3:20 pm

    I add to that list Paid Maternity Leave, which only reinforces the ideology that the government will be responsible for your children, if you aren’t. As I have said before, the government now subsidizes living, from conception to the grave (funeral supplements).

    Regardless of who started it, or has continued it, the time has come to take action to reinforce the family value that we are each responsible for our own, and that if we cannot afford to have children – we shouldn’t expect others to pay for that luxury. That if we want the luxury of being buried in death, that we need to save/insure for that, and so on.

    Whilst I believe there should always be a welfare system for cases of emergency, and for those few that will always be unemployable due to disability etc, we owe it to this great country step beyond the past, and have the courage to say we got it wrong. The problem is finding a way to do that, without making innocents suffer. Either way its going to cost for a complete overhaul that allows dignity to be returned to the people, where there is no dignity in being on welfare – but eventually action should see reward, whereas inaction will see continued dependence. The biggest problem will be convincing EVERYONE, that it is ‘everyones’ problem.

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