Netflix for NZ

July 19th, 2014 at 4:00 pm by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

is declining to comment on an Australian report that it plans to launch an online television service in New Zealand and Australia by the middle of next year.

Netflix’ California-based corporate communications director Joris Evers told Fairfax Media today Netflix had no comment on rumours it was coming to New Zealand. It had not made any announcements regarding the market.

Australian film-industry website  Inside Film reported that Netflix had made firm offers to major United States studios for the Australian and New Zealand streaming rights for “a wide range of first release and library movies and television content”.

Inside Film quoted two unnamed Netflix executives as saying a launch in the middle of 2015 was on the cards. However, the initial offers Netflix had made to studios for local content rights had not been viewed as “the most desirable”, it said.

About 30,000 New Zealanders and at least 100,000 Australians are estimated to have found workarounds that have let them subscribe to Netflix’ North American service.

I’m a subscriber to Netflix. It took a bit of effort, but I wanted to do everything I could to pay for the overseas content I want to view. It would be nice if I could subscribe without having to alter my IP address and zip code.

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13 Responses to “Netflix for NZ”

  1. KiwiGreg (3,278 comments) says:

    The day Netflix came into our house was the day we cancelled Sky. I also sold my Sky shares. I think they are screwed. $9 a month and all you really lose is sport.

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  2. chris (647 comments) says:

    We stopped our Sky account when we finally realised we were paying ~$50 a month (whatever it was at the time for the basic channels) for our kid to watch Cartoon Network, as we hardly watched anything on it. That’s when we started using Netflix, which has loads of good content for kids as well as for us. And none of this scheduled viewing rubbish, or paying extra to record and watch later. On demand viewing with a large catalogue is going to kill broadcast TV in the next few years.

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  3. scrubone (3,097 comments) says:

    Heck, even a single channel recorder, recording everything interesting off free to air gave me more options than Sky.

    I’m sure that Netflix will be better than Quickflix, but will that be enough to justify people changing?

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  4. metcalph (1,367 comments) says:

    Interesting bias in the estimates. Oz has 22.7 million people compared to NZ’s 4.4 million. So they should have at least 150,000 Netflix subscribers.

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  5. wreck1080 (3,999 comments) says:

    My be is that the nz netflix will be more expensive and have less choice.

    Just like everything else that comes here.

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  6. Fletch (6,528 comments) says:

    A new study says Netflix is one of the most popular services in Australia, despite not officially being available there.

    SYDNEY — Netflix, the American on-demand television and movie streaming service, is growing its audience in Australia without even launching in the local market.

    At the end of June, Village Roadshow confirmed Netflix was finally hitting our shores, although the company are yet to confirm a launch date. Impatient Aussies have already been getting in on the action – with Netflix growing steadily in popularity compared to local offerings over the last year and a half.

    A new study by personal finance site Pocketbook found Netflix is the second most popular paid-content media company in Australia, despite not being available here and actively geo-blocking Australian users.

    This could be a worry for the local rivals such as Foxtel, Ezyflix and Quickflix who have attempted to fill the gap in the market as it rapidly developed since the introduction of smart TVs.

    With the internet feeding us information as we deserve it, it is a hard call to make Australian users wait for what content the rest of the world is already watching and if the statistics are to be believed, it appears the audience is fighting back by looking past local offerings.

    The data shows 27% of Australians using media or rental subscriptions are using Netflix, with the company’s users tripling in size since January 2013. They are using the service by “tunnelling” with a work-around VPN to avoid geo-blocking.

    Australians no longer want to live on their own special schedule, when they know having the content on their home television is only a small hurdle away.

    MORE – http://mashable.com/2014/07/14/how-netflix-is-dominating-australia-from-abroad/

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  7. Mark Thomson (85 comments) says:

    “It would be nice if I could subscribe without having to alter my IP address and zip code.”

    You mean without lying? It continues to amaze me that you have such a casual view of private property rights.

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  8. ross411 (906 comments) says:

    Mark Thomson (83 comments) says:
    July 19th, 2014 at 11:14 pm
    “It would be nice if I could subscribe without having to alter my IP address and zip code.”

    You mean without lying? It continues to amaze me that you have such a casual view of private property rights.

    I see you don’t go any further than vague accusations. Very weak. He’s paying what other people are paying for it legally, to the same people. If he came to your house and sat at your table and ate your dinner, three bears style, perhaps your simplistic negativity would be justified. But we can’t all live in your fairy tale.

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  9. Dave Mann (1,243 comments) says:

    DPF…. could you tell us digital neophytes how to get around the geographical blocker? Also, surely you would need an American credit card or something?

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  10. Fletch (6,528 comments) says:

    Dave, there are free options like Hola (which some find a bit laggy), and other paid options like Getflix, unblock.us, or unotelly which make it look like you’re in the U.S. Getflix is Australian based and used to be the cheapest but recently they’ve changed it so you can’t subscribe annually with them, now only monthly (used to be $29 a year. Monthly cost is $3.95).

    Any one of those will do the job though, and from there you can subscribe to Netflix, Hulu, etc.

    Most of them you can try for free for two weeks without having to give any credit card info.
    A friend of mine is using unotelly, which he says is recommended by the geeks at geekzone.co.nz

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  11. Fletch (6,528 comments) says:

    Oh, and to check it is working (once you’ve chosen an option), and the speed, pop over to hulu.com and try viewing some of the free programmes they have there. Whatever service you use, the viewing can be a bit slower at evening prime time.

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  12. Mark Thomson (85 comments) says:

    Ross, didn’t mean to be vague. I thought the point was pretty clear, but let me elaborate. The content available through Netflix is owned by someone (in most cases not Netflix). That is to say, it is private property. Netflix is a distribution service. In order to be able to deliver the content to their customers, they must first license the content from its owners, i.e. they enter into a legal agreement that spells out the conditions under which they are permitted to stream it.

    Because the content is the property of the owner, they are entitled to insist on whatever conditions they choose, and for whatever reasons they choose. They don’t have to ask you, me or DPF whether we think those conditions are sensible, enlightened, sound business practice, socially useful or anything else. They own the content. They can do with it what they please.

    If a content owner licenses the content to Netflix on the condition that it be distributed only within a particular geographic region, Netflix is bound by they agreement they sign to abide by those conditions. To deliberately falsify your personal information in order to circumvent the legal obligations that Netflix operates under shows, in my opinion, a complete disregard for the rights of the owners of the content to do with their property whatever *they please*, based on whatever reasons *they choose*. Whether you pay for it is *completely* irrelevant.

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  13. Return To Sender (15 comments) says:

    Different content owners (called independent rights holders) hold the rights to distribute the content in different countries. The rights holder in the US may not hold the rights to distribute the content in NZ. Thus DPF, your work around is effectively stealing revenue from those rights holders who own the rights to distribute the content in NZ. Effectively a form of piracy

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