Nine new schools for Auckland

August 13th, 2014 at 3:00 pm by David Farrar

The Herald reports:

National will build nine new in Auckland if re-elected, associate Education Minister announced today.

The schools would be built as part of a $350 million investment into Auckland education infrastructure over the next four years, Ms Kaye said.

The announcement was made during a visit to Ponsonby Primary School with Prime Minister John Key this afternoon.

“We have recently invested in new schools in areas like Hamilton and Queenstown, and Auckland is an obvious candidate for significant new investment,” she said.

The new schools would be spread across the Auckland region, with four likely in the northern region, three in South Auckland, and two in West Auckland.

An additional 130 classrooms would also be built at existing school sites across the Auckland region to deal with forecast roll growth, Ms Kaye said.

A further eight schools would be renovated.

“We will deal with major redevelopments at Western Springs College in Western Springs, Southern Cross Campus (second stage) in Mangere East, and Sherwood Primary in Browns Bay as first cabs off the rank if we are returned to Government at the election.

That’s a significant amount of money for Auckland schools.

Funding would come from a mixture of the Future Investment Fund — which contains the proceeds from asset sales, and existing baselines including possible public/private partnerships, Ms Kaye said.

Those awful partial asset sales, helping fund new schools. How terrible.

Stuff reports:

Labour would make the same investments if elected, as it was “business-as-usual, baseline capital investment for any government,” he said.

How? Will they add this to their $17 billion? These are capital works being brought forward many years, which are not currently funded.

Cunliffe said public-private partnerships were the “trick” of the announcement.

“Now this is creeping privatisation of the education system – there is no economic case for it, there is not enough risk to be managed in a school to justify the higher private cost of capital,” he said.

A PPP is not privatisation. In the last Labour Government was a huge proponents of PPPs. But if Labour is ruling out PPPs, where are they going to find the money? It doesn’t grow on trees.

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19 Responses to “Nine new schools for Auckland”

  1. alloytoo (542 comments) says:

    The Holiday Highway to the north will be cancelled (As many times as is necessary to balance the books)

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  2. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    How will a PPP be a cheaper source of capital to build these schools?

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  3. hj (6,996 comments) says:

    In BNZ Chief Economist Tony Alexander’s weekly overview, Auckland house prices are set to move upwards nicely. Here are his 19 reasons why:
     

    3. The government is explicitly aiming to grow Auckland’s population as a means of achieving “agglomeration” benefits for economic growth which accrue from high interaction amongst economic players.

    http://www.davidwhitburn.com/blogs/auckland-house-prices-to-rise-over-10-in-2013/

    Savings Working Group
    January 2011
    “The big adverse gap in productivity between New Zealand and other countries opened up from the 1970s to the early 1990s. The policy choice that increased immigration – given the number of employers increasingly unable to pay First-World wages to the existing population and all the capital requirements that increasing populations involve – looks likely to have worked almost directly against the adjustment New Zealand needed to make and it might have been better off with a lower rate of net immigration. This adjustment would have involved a lower real interest rate (and cost of capital) and a lower real exchange rate, meaning a more favourable environment for raising the low level of productive capital per worker and labour productivity. The low level of capital per worker is a striking symptom of New Zealand’s economic challenge.

    http://www.treasury.govt.nz/publications/reviews-consultation/savingsworkinggroup/pdfs/swg-report-jan11.pdf

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  4. toad (3,674 comments) says:

    What National are not telling us is how many schools in other regions will be closed. Hekia will have her list prepared, but guess it is “wait till after the election” to find that out.

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  5. hj (6,996 comments) says:

    I notice on TV they are talking about gravel roads in the regions because Auckland needs money spent?

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  6. gump (1,647 comments) says:

    Where exactly are they proposing to build these new schools?

    There’s a severe shortage of suitable land for schools across the Auckland metro area. That’s the main reason why there’s a shortage of schools.

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  7. Lance (2,655 comments) says:

    @toad
    You might not have got the memo…. Auckland is GROWING…. a lot !!!!

    Oh and no more money is spent on Auckland roads than per capita. It’s just that in the good old days Auckland road taxes were looted to pay for rural lifestyles.

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  8. dime (9,972 comments) says:

    “What National are not telling us is how many schools in other regions will be closed.”

    hopefully none! even if its down to 4 students, keep it open in all its glory!!!!!!!!

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  9. Maxx (12 comments) says:

    Where will the money come from? You capitalists are so silly. YOU CAN PRINT IT! [/saracasm]

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  10. MikeG (425 comments) says:

    So National are building more schools and roads in anticipation of growth, but it won’t fund the CRL until after the growth happens. How about some consistency?

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  11. peterwn (3,271 comments) says:

    MikeG What is CRL ?

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  12. Tarquin North (297 comments) says:

    The unions, Labour and the Greens won’t like this. I don’t know why, they just don’t seem to like anything. Must be sad.

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  13. mjw (396 comments) says:

    How will the private partners get a return on their capital? They will have to charge somebody something.

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  14. gump (1,647 comments) says:

    @perterwn

    CRL = Central Rail Link (or Loop)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/City_Rail_Link

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  15. burt (8,269 comments) says:

    Once Labour are back in office Mallard will be excellent at closing these down – he did such a great job of this in the past.

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  16. Rightandleft (663 comments) says:

    This is a good thing and I’m happy to see the funding from asset sales going to a core service like education. My only worry is about the type of schools they are building. Recently the govt has been obsessed with these so-called “modern learning environments” that seems to mean big open classrooms where multiple classes have to share the same space even as they do totally different subjects. Imagine Spanish, History and Maths sharing one room, it would drive me nuts as a teacher and as a students I can’t imagine it being good for focused attention.

    There are some schools where this works because they subscribe to a specific pedagogy based on student-directed self-motivated learning with the teacher just a facilitator. That’s great for some kids and it’s wonderful parents have that choice to send their child to a school like Albany Senior. But making all new or rebuilt schools in this style when the majority still use a pedagogy that requires teacher-directed learning these classrooms are not helpful and can cause a lot of stress and difficulty.

    Some of our top performing schools, like Auckland Grammar or Westlake Boys, stick to tried and tested methods with normal sized classrooms and succeed. National always preaches that one-size-fits all is wrong for education and they need to practise what they preach and not force a single pedagogy on every school via construction.

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  17. daniel carter (34 comments) says:

    Too late. They should’ve promised this at the last election. Our primary school has been overcrowded for several years and others around us are even worse. It is appalling and damaging to my kids education that this didn’t happen sooner. That’s another reason why I don’t support National.

    More evidence of their crappiness is that they claim standard govt business as some kind of special advance in policy. Good govts build schools in areas that need it! That is so obvious.

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  18. MH (752 comments) says:

    A few good blokes in them wouldn’t go amiss, it’s the amisses and not the misters in the primary sector that is a worry. Balance and abiding by the rules and spirit of Rugby Union ,these schools could reintroduce mixed races as well,rather than the segregated policies brought about by selling off state housing in certain areas.

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  19. EAD (1,073 comments) says:

    The National-Labour government of the last 15 years have turned Auckland into a sh*t hole. Count me out – I’d much rather live like a human being than a rat

    Here is a cartoon that illustrates why our political elites must go for all this faux growth at all costs.
    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-08-12/us-welfare-state-summarized-1-cartoon

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