PPTA on Investing in Educational Success

September 2nd, 2014 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

The PPTA has a blog post on some of the misinformation on the Investing in Educational Success initiative.  They state they are supportive of it because:

IES is a political initiative because it comes from the party that is in government and because it’s election year but its aims are entirely consistent with professional policy around such things as:

  • collaboration between schools

  • openness and the sharing of expertise

  • career paths –  especially for new and beginning teachers.

They deal with five myths being put out:

  1. That the proposal in the cabinet paper is the same policy that is now being negotiated – it has changed.
  2. That it will be mandatory – you can’t force people to collaborate
  3. No such role as a super principal – now called community of schools leadership role
  4. It is not performance pay – they are regular roles with an allowance
  5. There is no final agreement, just an interim agreement, which may lead to a proposal to take to members

Now the PPTA don’t say who is putting out the misinformation, but pretty easy to do a search on the Internet and find this release a few days ago from the NZEI:

The IES policy proposes the creation of four new roles, including an extra $40,000pa for “executive principals” and “expert teachers”, who would mentor and manage across a cluster of 10 schools, with the aim of lifting student achievement. “Change principals” and “lead teachers” would also be created.

So the NZEI is using role titles which they know are outdated, and no longer part of the proposal. But as they are acting in bad faith, they try to hoodwink their members and the public on what the current proposal actually is.

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13 Responses to “PPTA on Investing in Educational Success”

  1. WineOh (630 comments) says:

    Hipkins got “schooled” on National Radio on this topic, trying to blow the trumpet for the Labour policy instead but the interviewer (Katherine Ryan?) pointed out that most of the things he was being critical about were also in the Labour policy.

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  2. MT_Tinman (3,184 comments) says:

    IES, PPTA, NZEI?

    All these letters confuse me.

    I no longer know who are the good guys, who the bad.

    Could someone help by giving me a list (or directions where to find a list) of the acronyms and their owners in the education sector?

    Please.

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  3. burt (8,269 comments) says:

    MT_Tinman

    It’s pretty easy to work out who the good guys are and who the bad guys are.
    The good guys start the sentence with; The students….
    The bad guys start the sentence with; The union …

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  4. MT_Tinman (3,184 comments) says:

    burt, in my world the good guys start the sentence with “The pupils…”.

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  5. Keeping Stock (10,337 comments) says:

    @ MT_Tinman – I normally have little time for unions. But full marks to the PPTA (the secondary school teacher union) for not rejecting Investing in Educational Success, just because the policy had been advanced by National. It’s a really good example of a union being prepared to collaborate with a government which is normally its natural enemy for the benefit of both its members and the young people they teach.

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  6. greenjacket (465 comments) says:

    I saw the consultation documents the NZEI sent out to teachers for their vote on the issue, and to be quite honest, what the government was proposing seemed to make a lot of sense. The NZEI is just playing politics.

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  7. timmydevo (52 comments) says:

    Grief… it’s not the view of the PPTA – Look at the header:

    Welcome to the blog of the New Zealand Post Primary Teachers’ Association / Te Wehengarua (PPTA), …. A blog that’s not afraid to ruffle some feathers.

    Disclaimer: The opinions expressed are the personal opinions of the bloggers and commenters and may not necessarily reflect the position of PPTA .

    Again, let’s make it very clear. Primary teachers aren’t against the concepts of collaboration – they do it already. They already share information in forums like the Virtual Learning Network, Twitter, face-to-face… What they’re against is a lot of money being spent when it’s glaringly obvious that there are other issues that need to be addressed first.

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  8. RightNow (6,994 comments) says:

    Isn’t this the cue for Clever Mallard to accuse Hekia Parata of giving a staff member the bash?

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  9. Nigel Kearney (1,012 comments) says:

    I don’t blame an organisation that represents teachers for trying to advance the interests of teachers. The government’s job is to represent pupils and say no to unions where necessary.

    The problem with the NZEI is that putting money into smaller class sizes instead of higher teacher salaries is in the interests of the union because they get more members, but not in the interests of teachers who are individually worse off. They are hurting their own members for political gain.

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  10. Yogibear (366 comments) says:

    But, timmydevo, it is the official view of the PPTA as expressed by their office holders and other authorised to speak on their behalf.

    I’ve heard the view on National Radio of all places!

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  11. lilman (958 comments) says:

    Eating Brunch and saw the thread on Phil Goff,I was sick in my mouth.

    Lying little scumbag.

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  12. MT_Tinman (3,184 comments) says:

    Keeping Stock (10,178 comments) says:
    September 2nd, 2014 at 9:54 am

    …… full marks to the PPTA (the secondary school teacher union) for not rejecting Investing in Educational Success,

    I agree.

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  13. doggone7 (801 comments) says:

    MT_Tinman “…IES…All these letters confuse me…”

    They confuse me too. They are intended to. The marketing with that title for the approach is a con. The con is that every dollar spent in education is not invested for success. In fact the implication is that at the moment all the money is spent for failure.

    This particular approach is different – finally (drum roll) we are investing in educational success!

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