Parliament 16 September 2015

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. DAVID BENNETT to the Minister of Finance: How is New Zealand’s labour market supporting resilience and delivering higher incomes for families?
  2. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Why did he say in July last year that “We think unemployment will be down to 4.5 percent in the very foreseeable future”, given unemployment has risen in each successive quarter, and now stands at 5.9 percent?
  3. DAVID CLENDON to the Minister of Corrections: What was the reason for issuing each of the seven performance notices to Serco, which were then withdrawn; and what was the dollar amount for each of those notices?
  4. MELISSA LEE to the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment: How is the Government helping students make more informed tertiary study decisions?
  5. FLETCHER TABUTEAU to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  6. KANWALJIT SINGH BAKSHI to the Minister for Building and Housing: Can he confirm that the 1,116 building consents issued in July in Auckland, and the 8,567 for the latest year, are the highest in 10 years, and what further steps is he talking to ensure the new build rate of houses in Auckland continues to grow?
  7. PHIL TWYFORD to the Minister for Building and Housing: How much does MBIE estimate has been saved on building materials for a standard home by the Government’s suspensions of tariffs and anti-dumping duties on building products and, since its commencement in July 2014, by how many dollars has the price of the average Auckland home increased?
  8. GARETH HUGHES to the Minister of Energy and Resources: Does he agree with the Treasury that solar electricity generation is one of the opportunities with the “most potential” to “reduce our carbon dioxide emissions in the medium-to-long-term”; if so, does he think the current rules are working to give Kiwis going solar a fair go?
  9. JACINDA ARDERN to the Minister for Social Development: If reducing child poverty is a priority for her Government, why has the number of children living in poverty, based on the Household Incomes Report, increased from 260,000 in 2013, to 305,000 in 2014?
  10. TODD MULLER to the Minister for Primary Industries: What recent reports has he received on growth in the avocado industry?
  11. RICHARD PROSSER to the Minister of Conservation: Does she have confidence in all aspects of her department’s use of compound 1080 poison?
  12. Hon DAVID CUNLIFFE to the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment: Does he stand by all his statements to the House last week in respect of tertiary education organisations?

National: Four questions on the labour market, tertisry students, building consents and avocados.

Labour: Four questions on unemployment, building tariffs, child poverty and tertiary institutes

Greens: Two questions on Mt Eden Prison and solar energy

NZ First: Two questions on PM standing by his statements and 1080

General Debate 3.00 pm to 4.00 pm

The general debate is 12 speeches of up to five minutes each for a debate of an hour.

Privileges Committee report 4.00 pm to 6.00 pm

Question of privilege regarding use of social media to report on parliamentary proceedings

Each MP can speak for up to 10 minutes on this debate. There is no time limit but it is likely the Speaker would close the debate before two hours.

Local Bill 7.30 pm to 9.30 pm

Wellington Town Belt Bill – first reading

This bill changes the legal framework for the Wellington Town Belt, with the aim of strengthening the protection of, and modernising the governance arrangements for, the Town Belt. It is in the name of Wellington Central MP Grant Robertson.

  • Introduced September 2015

The first reading consists of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each so the debate is a maximum of two hours.

Members’ Bills 9.30 pm to 10.00 pm

New Zealand Superannuation and Retirement Income (Pro Rata Entitlement) Amendment Bill – first reading

The bill amends the New Zealand Superannuation and Retirement Income Act 2001 to provide for a pro rata entitlement (PRE) to New Zealand superannuation (NZS) based on residence and presence in New Zealand between the ages of 20 and 65 years. The Bill also removes the “direct deduction” provisions of the Social Security Act 1964 which provide for the deduction of overseas pension from the New Zealand Superannuation paid to people who receive those pensions. It is in the name of NZ First MP Denis O’Rourke.

  • Introduced June 2015

The first reading consists of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each so the debate is a maximum of two hours.

Extended Sitting 9.00 am to 1.00 pm (Thursday)

Government Notices of Motion

  1. That, pursuant to sections 3(1), 3(4) and 5(1) of the Ombudsmen Act 1975, Peter Francis Boshier be appointed as an Ombudsman for a term of 5 years, with effect from 10 December 2015, and upon taking up the office of Ombudsman, he be appointed as Chief Ombudsman with effect from the date that the incumbent Chief Ombudsman vacates the position.
  2. That, pursuant to section 11(2) and clause 2 of Schedule 3 of the Public Audit Act 2001, the House recommend to the Governor-General that Greg Mark Schollum of Wellington be appointed as the Deputy Controller and Auditor-General for a term not exceeding 5 years with effect from 28 September 2015.
  3. That, pursuant to section 5 of the Independent Police Conduct Authority Act 1988 and section 32 of the Crown Entities Act 2004, this House recommends His Excellency the Governor-General reappoints Dianne Mary Macaskill and appoints Simon Murdoch, CNZM each as members of the Independent Police Conduct Authority, for terms of three years.
  4. That, pursuant to section 10 of the Contraception, Sterilisation and Abortion Act 1977, this House recommends His Excellency the Governor-General reappoints Dame Linda Holloway as Chair, reappoints Dr Tangimoana Habib as a member and appoints Ms Carolyn McIlraith as a member of the Abortion Supervisory Committee each for terms of three years.

Speeches for the first two motions are ten minutes each and for the next two, five minutes each. There is no time limit but the debates are not expected to be overly long.

Government Bills

Reserves and Other Lands Disposal Bill – third reading

The bill makes a number of changes to the status of parcels of land, land titles, and previous Reserves and Other Lands Disposal Acts.

  • Introduced: July 2008
  • 1st reading: March 2009, passed 113 to 9 with only Greens opposed
  • Select Committee report: September 2009, supported unanimously with amendments
  • 2nd reading: May 2015, passed unanimously
  • Committee of the Whole: July 2015, passed 109 to 12 with only NZ First opposed

The third reading consists of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each so the debate is a maximum of two hours.

Building (Pools) Amendment Bill – first reading

This Bill will amend the Building Act 2004 and repeal the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987 to reduce the compliance burden currently imposed on pool owners and territorial authorities in relation to residential pools while maintaining child safety.

  • Introduced September 2015

The first reading consists of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each so the debate is a maximum of two hours.

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