This should not be allowed in the regulated period

July 24th, 2014 at 12:00 pm by David Farrar

Hone-At-The-Trough-630x472

Photo from Whale.

This billboard would be fine before the regulated period, but the rules are much tighter during the regulated period and I would be very surprised if this falls within the rules.

UPDATE: It seems that despite the crest, it was not funded from the parliamentary budget. Mana have agreed to remove the crest as that normally signifies it has been paid for by Parliament.

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Armstrong on McCully

July 11th, 2014 at 10:00 am by David Farrar

John Armstrong writes:

Murray McCully will not be resigning from the Cabinet over his ministry’s inept handling of the alleged sex attack involving a staff member at the Malaysian High Commission.

He is under no constitutional obligation to do so. He is under no substantial political pressure (as yet) to do so. He has done nothing that is politically shady or morally dubious which would give his opponents the grounds for demanding that he does so.

Even if the foreign minister did offer his resignation, it is most unlikely that John Key would accept it. In short, it is going to take much more than the victim in the alleged attack calling on him to step down for that to actually happen.

Interesting that the politician who has said the most insensitive things about the case is Hone Harawira for saying it is all a fuss about bugger all. Yet no one is calling on him to resign – just Murray McCully, who is actually the MP who ended up getting Malaysia to agree to extradite the alleged attacker.

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Two new magazine covers

June 28th, 2014 at 12:00 pm by David Farrar

kimdc2

kimdc1

 

Circulating by e-mail.

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Former Mana candidate also standing against Harawira

June 16th, 2014 at 7:00 am by David Farrar

Pete George blogs that Clinton Dearlove is standing in Te Tai Tokerau as an independent against Hone Harawira. Dearlove was Mana’s candidate in 2011 in te Tai Tonga.

I can’t recall if we’ve ever had a candidate from one election then stand against their own leader the following election. It suggests not all is well in Mana.

This should help Davis, as Dearlove will take votes off Harawira, if anyone.

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Winston denies paying Hone’s fine

June 3rd, 2014 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

The Herald reports:

Current and former MPs and “ordinary people” banded together to pay the $632 fine Hone Harawira received last year for defying police at a 2012 Auckland housing protest.

But while one of his Mana Party contenders claims Winston Peters was among the donors, Mr Harawira will not name them, even though it appears he is required to do so under parliamentary rules. …

But last week at a public meeting of Housing NZ tenants in Grey Lynn, the sole nominee for Mana Party candidate for Tamaki Makaurau, Kereama Pene, said: “Our Mana leader was dragged out of his car in GI.

He got done for it. Do you know who paid his $500 fine?”

Someone called out “Kim Dotcom!”.

But Mr Pene said: “No, it was worse than that, much worse than that, it was Winston Peters.”

I have to say that it seems unlikely.

However, the fine, including costs, is large enough to require disclosure under the rules for Parliament’s Register of Pecuniary Interests because it was paid by someone other than Mr Harawira.

The rules also require the identity of those paying off MPs’ debts to be declared.

Mr Harawira last night refused to comment on what he said was a “petty” matter.

Following the petty rules is only for white MOFOs!

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68 days off

January 29th, 2014 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

Prime Minister John Key has accused Mana party leader Hone Harawira of “taking the mickey” over his absences from Parliament.

MPs will have their attendance recorded – and made public – from today. Parliament has adopted a roll call to show how many MPs, who earn at least $147,800 a year, turn up for debates, select committees and other business.

And this morning Key pointed the finger at the Mana leader, saying he was often not present. However, he could not provide further details.

“Hone Harawria is an obvious one,” he told reporters.

“You go and look at the number of days he was here in the 2011-12-13 period – not very many.”

The record for this Parliament (from 2011 to present) shows Harawira had approval for 68 days leave.

ACT’s John Banks had 29 and United Future Peter Dunne had 13 days leave approved. Independent MP Brendan Horan had permission for 21 days off since he was expelled from NZ First in 2012.

Exactly what proportion of sitting days Harawira has missed was unclear, but this year there were 84 sitting days scheduled.

That’s a key thing. We’re talking 68 days away, out of only around 84 scheduled days a year. Now this is over two years, but still suggests an absentee rate of 40% or so.

The PM and the Foreign and Trade Ministers will generally not be in the House much because their jobs require them to travel a lot.

I’ve blogged before on how rarely Harawira has spoken in the House, and also how he has asked almost no written questions.

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Trevett on MPs and summer

December 26th, 2013 at 11:33 am by David Farrar

Claire Trevett writes:

After a year of travels, both domestic and international, Mana leader Hone Harawira also decided to follow in the footsteps of his ancestors, the great explorers, and set up an expedition of his own: the goal being to find out where his office in Parliament actually is.

Heh.

Labour MP Shane Jones will finally give up his favourite pastime of riling up those in his own party by shredding the internal organs of the Green Party and singing paeans to mining, casinos and big business. He will instead be elected as leader of the political party that is his true turangawaewae: Act.

Shane would be an excellent Leader of ACT!

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Hone and Parliament

December 16th, 2013 at 2:35 pm by David Farrar

The Herald reports:

Prime Minister John Key has accused Mana leader Hone Harawira of taking a taxpayer-funded junket to South Africa after it appeared Mr Harawira did not attend Nelson Mandela’s funeral.

Harawira also refused to clarify if the taxpayer paid for his wife’s travel also:

Mana Party leader Hone Harawira won’t say whether his wife travelled to South Africa on the taxpayer dollar.

Mr Harawira has returned from a taxpayer-funded trip to farewell the late former South African president Nelson Mandela.

He told media at Auckland Airport this morning that it was a moving trip, which included performing a haka to Mr Mandela’s friends and family.

But he refused to say who paid for his wife’s trip.

“Come in with this kind of bullshit line about taxpayer funding when Hone Harawira goes, but nobody says boo about it when John Key goes.

“I’ll give you an answer when I hear his answer.”

Well that is easy. John Key changed the rules in 2009 so Minister’s no longer have their spouses travel with them at the taxpayers expense.  Rodney Hide was demolished for using his parliamentary funding to have his partner travel with him. Will Hone be held to the same standard.

UPDATE: Harawira has now said his wife was funded by private donors, not the taxpayer.

“This is a guy who has barely turned up to Parliament in 2013… He has spent a hell of a lot of 2013 doing anything other than actually taking his place in Parliament.

Hone has asked a total of three written questions in 2013. yes, just three. A disgrace. Three out of almost 17,000 asked by opposition MPs.

His contributions in the debating chamber have been almost non-existent.  In the last year his contributions have been:

  • Six oral questions (these are allocated so no issue there)
  • Spoke on the Budget debate, the financial review debate, the PM’s statement, two general debates, one urgent debate, one obituary, one local bill and one Treaty settlement. On average that is one speech ever six weeks!

So Hone Harawira has spoken on two bills in 2013. In the past year 145 bills passed into law, 57 had a first reading and 67 a second reading meaning 269 bills that he could have spoken on.

Hone Harawira has no interest or ability to be a parliamentarian. He is a very effective activist and protester. But he is a failure as a Member of Parliament.

 

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Can Labour win back Te Tai Tokerau?

November 12th, 2013 at 10:00 am by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

Mana leader Hone Harawira is under pressure to hold his Tai Tai Tokerau seat with a new poll showing him running a close second to a yet-to-be-selected Labour candidate.

The Te Karere-Digipoll asked voters when they choose their local MP which party would the candidate likely come from.

Labour had the edge with 32 per cent over Mana with 28 per cent.

A Maori party candidate would get 14 per cent, the survey found.

Harawira held the seat in 2011 with a 1165 majority over Labour’s Kelvin Davis.

Labour have said they want to win all seven Maori seats. Flavell looks very safe in Waiariki. I thought Harawira would be streaks ahead in Te Tai Tokerau, but it seems not.

There was strong backing for Harawira’s performance as the local MP with 14 per cent rating it “fantastic”, 39 per cent above average and 31 per cent average.

Only 12 per cent rated it either below average or poor. 

That suggests the locals like him as their local MP. The question is will they vote to keep him.

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What Hone was fighting against

July 27th, 2013 at 9:48 am by David Farrar

Paula Bennett FB

 

This is what Hone broke the law to fight against. That terrible Government providing houses to low income families in Northland.

Hat Tip: Keeping Stock

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Numbers or Results?

May 29th, 2013 at 3:00 pm by David Farrar

As readers may have seen, Hone Harawira spat on the floor in response to National’s food in schools announcement. His criticism was that not enough money is being spent on it.

This is something you often see from the left. They measure how much you care by how much taxpayers money you are willing to spend on something.

Hone’s bill was proposing food in schools in decile 1 and 2 schools only. The Govt has actually announced it for deciles 3 and 4 also – yet Hone spits on the floor at it, merely because taxpayers are not spending enough money on it.

The same fixation with numbers we see with Danyl at the Dim-Post. He declares the reason MPI made an error with China export certificates is because they have fewer staff.

We went through all this back in the 1990s. Turns out a lot of those back-office public servants – who National loves to sack by the thousand on the grounds that they don’t actually do anything, approximately one hundred and fifty of whom were let go during the MPI merger – do genuinely do some things, like check export certificates.

Danyl is convinced that the quality of the public service is determined by its size. If you care about the public service, you hire more staff. This is a core faith on the left.

I’d be interested in a shred of proof that the mistake made by MPI was anything to do with fewer staff. A belief that more staff means no errors, is like believing in God – can’t prove or disprove.

Regular surveys by the State Services Commission have shown that satisfaction with public services is increasing – despite fewer staff.

And no one has ever said that staff made redundant don’t actually do anything. That’s an insult to them. You don’t make staff redundant because they do nothing. You sack them, if they do nothing. Staff get made redundant because employers have to live within their means, and can sometimes operate in different ways with fewer staff. Sometimes fewer staff will mean a reduction in quality, but not always. Judging quality on number of staff is bonkers.

I worked for an NGO that made around half the staff redundant. We thought it would be a disaster, and fought against it. in fact we discovered that some staff roles actually ended up creating un-necessary work for other staff, and in some ways things worked better with fewer staff.

The belief that you show how much you care by spending more money or hiring more staff, is fatally flawed. What is important is outcomes, not inputs.

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Hone missing in action

April 25th, 2013 at 3:00 pm by David Farrar

Claire Trevett at NZ Herald reports:

Mana Party leader has been absent for 49 of the 120 sitting days since the 2011 election.

That’s appalling. That means he has missed 16 entire weeks of the House.

Mana leader Hone Harawira described himself as going “to battle for those without a voice in Parliament” at his party’s conference this month but he has been a rare sight in Parliament this year.

In the nine weeks that Parliament has been in session, the MP has given just two speeches and asked one oral question to a minister.

Mr Harawira has spoken only on the Prime Minister’s statement after the opening of Parliament in January and on a debate into financial reviews of Government departments. Major legislation on which the Mana Party has taken a strong stand but Mr Harawira did not speak included the final stage of the welfare reforms.

Mr Harawira was also away on the day in which Treaty settlement bills were debated and for the passing of the same-sex marriage law, although earlier in the day, he had hosted a “Big Breakfast” for schoolchildren in Otara to publicise his member’s bill for a free meal for low-decile schools.

His absence has been noted. Other MPs on the Maori Affairs select committee said he has only occasionally attended of late.

Mr Harawira has also been entitled to ask four primary questions and about 20 follow-up questions in Question Time but has taken only one slot.

Most Opposition MPs would crawl over broken glass for an opportunity to ask a question in question time, but Hone can’t even be bothered turning up!

Speaker David Carter said a formal attendance record for MPs was no longer kept, but Mr Harawira had been given 49 days of leave since the 2011 election, during which Parliament has sat for about 120 days. Party leaders have more responsibilities than other MPs, but most, including Prime Minister John Key and Labour leader David Shearer, attend on two of the three sitting days.

Party leaders do have to balance parliamentary and party responsibilities. but as MPs they are paid by the taxpayer to be in Parliament, making speeches, asking questions, doing the hard grunt on select committees to improve laws. It seems Hone is mainly using taxpayer resources to build up his party machine.

A spokesman for Mr Harawira said he was in Hawaii for a United Nations event this week. When contacted, Mr Harawira hung up.

Says it all.

Mr Harawira has criticised the Maori Party for its support agreement with National, but Mr Flavell said Mr Harawira had not been in Parliament to challenge the Government, or to put forward alternative ideas.

Despite the cutback in travel to Wellington, Mr Harawira’s travel expenses for the first three months of the year were still higher than any other non-ministerial MP, including Mr Shearer.

We are funding the Mana Party.

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Nothing to do with Hone

February 19th, 2013 at 4:00 pm by David Farrar

David Fisher at NZ Herald reports:

Three sons of anti-violence campaigner Hinewhare Harawira – and nephews of MP Hone Harawira – are facing charges over an assault on a 12-year-old boy. …

The three sons facing charges of injuring with intent to injure in relation to the August 24 incident are Mau Toa Harawira, 30, Enesi Zane Brooks Taito, 25, and Tohora Harawira, 22.

Assaulting a child is loathsome. However I think the reference to Hone Harawira and headline of “Harawira sons charged” is inappropriate.

These three people are all adults. One of them is 30. Their uncle is not responsible for what they do. Even their mother is not responsible.

The parliamentary office of Hone Harawira, leader of the Mana Party and MP for Te Tai Tokerau, declined to comment.

He shouldn’t have been asked to comment. Would any other MP be asked to comment on what an adult nephew does?

Don’t take this to mean any support for the three men who have been charged. Three adult men beating up a 12 year old is awful, and if guilty they should be punished. But I don’t believe in guilt by association.

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It was always about leadership

January 24th, 2013 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

Kate Chapman at Stuff reports:

Mr Harawira said he had been approached by Maori Party members around the country who were keen for him to take over.

“Clearly they’re in dire straits right now, their membership has just dropped through the floor.”

Mr Harawira quit the Maori Party ahead of the 2011 election following perpetual infighting.

There would be ground rules to the proposed merger – Mr Harawira wants be the leader and the Maori Party would have to end its relationship with National.

At the time Hone left the Maori Party, I said it was more about the fact he wanted to be the Leader, than anything else. I think this confirms it.

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The MP who thinks he is above the law

October 13th, 2012 at 11:00 am by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

Mr Harawira said: “I parked my car in front of a truck and shone my light up high on the woman on the roof. I stayed in my car. They broke into my car and smashed at least one window and arrested me.”

That is Hone’s version. The Police:

Officers had managed to clear all the vehicles to allow the passage of the truck and trailer unit, except for one vehicle which was driven and occupied by Mr Harawira.

“Repeated attempts were made to converse with Mr Harawira who refused to acknowledge police directions and remained locked in his vehicle.

“The house removal driver advised he could not remove his truck and trailer without the removal of Mr Harawira’s vehicle. After exhaustive attempts to converse with Mr Harawira, including written requests placed on his windscreen, the decision was made to enter the vehicle and this was done with the use of an automotive glass entry devise borrowed from the tow company, shortly after midnight.”

So Hone thinks he is above the law.

Meanwhile, Housing NZ yesterday hit out at protesters, saying its tenants were feeling pressured to take part in protest action.

“Since the project was announced, we have been receiving regular calls from affected tenants to say they are feeling pressured to participate in protest action, which has been largely organised and run by people who are not impacted by the redevelopment,” the general manager of asset development, Sean Bignell, said.

The professional protesters such as Hone are bullying the actual local residents. They should stand up to the bullies.

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The pre-ballot

September 20th, 2012 at 12:37 pm by David Farrar

Chris Hipkins blogs:

 Today at midday there’ll be a ballot for members’ bills, with two places available on the Order Paper. A preliminary ballot will be held to determine which of the following bills will be entered in the main ballot:

20. Education (Breakfast and Lunch Programmes in Schools) Amendment Bill – Hone Harawira
22. Education (Food in Schools) Amendment Bill – David Shearer

In my view, the Clerk’s decision to conduct a preliminary ballot to determine which of these two bills, which have similar aims, goes into the ballot is the wrong one. While the goals of the two bills are similar, the means of achieving them a very different. The test needs to be whether the bills are substantially the same in their ‘content’, not whether they are the same in the outcome they seek to achieve.

For example, if two bills were put up around the transportation of goods from Wellington to Auckland, and one sought to do so via rail and one via road, if we used ‘outcome’ as the criteria for determining whether they were the same, only one bill would go in the ballot, yet clearly the bills are very different in their content. We’ll be relitigating this for sure, but for today at least, only one of these bills will make it into the ballot.

You can see the full list of bills in today’s ballot after the break. I’ll post the results just after midday.

Update: Hone Harawira’s Bill made it into the ballot and the following were drawn:

Conservation Natural Heritage Protection Bill – Jacqui Dean
Electricity (Renewable Preference) Amendment Bill – Charles Chauvel

Heh, no wonder Labour are annoyed. Imagine if Hone got his bill drawn on what they are trying to make their signature issue.

I wanted to look at both bills, to see if I agree with Hipkins that the bill are different enough to let them both go through. My gut reaction is you trust the Office of the Clerk who have no political motives, but they are not infallible.

But Shearer’s bill is not on the parliamentary website. I don’t know why. Maybe it was only finished this morning. Hone’s bill is here. Hopefully Shearer’s bill will go online at some stage, so we can judge for ourselves.

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Why is Labour silent on the N word?

September 7th, 2012 at 7:58 am by David Farrar

Hone Harawira has said he will never support a National-led Government, so if he gets the chance will support or even be a Minister in a Labour-led Government. David Shearer has not ruled him out.

So has Labour got anything to say on whether they find it acceptable for Harawira to call other Maori MPs, “house niggers”?

You see their silence is rather inconsistent. In 2005 David Benson Pope alleged Rodney Hide said “dopey niggers” in the House. He was wrong, as what Rodney said was “Don’t be negative”. But Benson-Pope said he was so offended he was going to file a Privileges Complaint. He also refused to apologise for his mistake, until Clark made him do so.

So will any Maori MP from Labour have the guts to stand up to Hone and say how offensive his words were? I won’t hold my breath waiting.

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Hone calls other Maori MPs “house niggers”

September 6th, 2012 at 8:10 am by David Farrar

Hat Tip: Whale Oil

I think one can understand why Hone didn’t last in the Maori Party, if that is his view of other MPs.

Any other MP who referred to Maori MPs as “niggers” would be resigning in disgrace.

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Harawira v McClay

August 19th, 2012 at 9:54 am by David Farrar

Neil Reid at SST reports:

A war of words has erupted over National MP Todd McClay’s proposed gang patch ban, with Mana Party leader Hone Harawira labelling him a “foolish dickhead” promoting a “deeply racist” bill.

Harawira has threatened to wear a gang patch into Parliament if the bill becomes law, a move McClay says casts doubts on Harawira’s suitability to be an MP.

“The guy is such an idiot,” Harawira said. “I’m not going to stand by and watch a blonde, blue-eyed redneck kick around poor people who, out of desperation, bond together because they see nothing in the blonde, blue-eyed society to give them a sense of hope for their own or their children’s futures.”

I don’t know what Todd McClay’s hair colour or eye colour has to do with anything. And I also don’t think wanting to ban gang patches inside government buildings is a redneck move. I think it is an anti-gang move.

Harawira said he understood why some people from lower socio-economic backgrounds joined gangs, adding that 90 per cent of those targeted by the bill would be Maori, making it a “deeply racist piece of legislation”.

Does that mean the DPB is racist?

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Hone on same sex marriage

June 25th, 2012 at 12:00 pm by David Farrar

An interesting interview on Radio Rhema with Hone Harawira on the same sex marriage issue. I think the only broadcast interview he has done on the issue.

A couple of quotes:

My politics might be radical, morally I am very conservative. …

I value the marriage my father and my mother had. I value that marriage that I have with my wife. I don’t know necessarily that you just changes rules because somebody says change rules. …

One thing I am proud of in being in politics is I’ve never voted for something I didn’t personally believe in.

Quite a fascinating interview. Few MPs would self-describe themselves as “morally very conservative”, especially the leader of a radical nationalist left party.

Also an insight into Hone that he has never voted for something he doesn’t personally believe in. I think this helps us understand why he was never going to last in the Maori Party, or in fact in any party he did not lead. The reality of politics is that MPs often have to vote for something they are not always personally convinced of. If this wasn’t the case, then every single issue and vote would be a conscience vote, and no Government could ever actually lay out a policy platform. Even Keith Holyoake once said he only agreed with about 80% of what his Government did.

Politics involves compromises, and Hone’s inability to ever compromise will always make him less effective than he could be.

As for the actual issue of same sex marriage, Hone has said he is happy to talk to Mana about it but I note his statement about never voting for something he does not believe in. I wouldn’t want to bet money on him changing his position.

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Hone and Mana on gay marriage

June 21st, 2012 at 7:00 am by David Farrar

Morgan Godfery blogs:

 Hone Harawira is known for a lot of things, but not many people realise he is a social and moral conservative. He is against, for example, drug liberalisation and gay marriage and in an interview with Bryce Edwards Hone claimed to be against a society of “choice”. This, I think, reveals an authoritarian attitude not uncommon in Maori males of Hone’s generation. …

Anywho, as I said Hone Harawira is opposed to gay marriage, or marriage equality as it’s positively framed. This position has been opposed universally within the Mana Party. Leading members have asked Hone to justify his position, but he is yet to face the membership with a justification. This is unacceptable from the party leader and he will be rightly savaged for it. 

This issue will be interesting to see play out.

Hone is a Maori nationalist politician who is left economically. Most of his party though are hard core leftists, who detest social conservatism. This naturally creates tensions.

The other friction is that Hone is not a “Explain yourself” type politician. he is more in the Jim Anderton mode of my way or the highway. I still believe his departure from the Maori Party was more about ambition – he could not secure the leadership. So he may be reluctant to moderate his views, no matter how much his supporters want him to.

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The coalition of the left

February 21st, 2012 at 3:00 pm by David Farrar

Claire Trevett reports at NZ Herald:

Labour leader David Shearer has begun wooing potential coalition partners – including dinner with NZ First leader Winston Peters and calling an end to the Cold Shoulder War with Mana leader Hone Harawira.

Mr Shearer confirmed he had eaten dinner with Mr Peters last Wednesday at Wellington’s Trade Kitchen restaurant. He said it was an impromptu dinner after they appeared together on a TV3 show.

“It was just a getting together and having a bit of chat, as you’d expect.”

The pair were spotted and it was reported by blogger Cameron Slater on his Whaleoil blog. Yesterday, Mr Shearer would not divulge what they discussed.

“That’s a private conversation, not a public conversation. We didn’t invite the world’s media and put a microphone in a tea pot.”

Mr Shearer also takes a more generous view towards Mana leader Hone Harawira than his predecessor Phil Goff did. Mr Goff had ruled out working with Mr Harawira in a coalition, saying he did not believe he could be trusted.

However, Mr Shearer said although he had not specifically discussed it with Mr Harawira he had talked to him at events and it was “perfectly amicable”.

This is sensible stuff for Shearer. He is unlikely to be able to form a Government in the future without Peters and Harawira. A Labour-led Government is likely to be a Labour-Greens-NZ First-Mana Government. Of course Peters and Harawira have polar opposite views on certain issues, but that won’t stop them accepting Ministerial positions.

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Harawira praises Key

February 6th, 2012 at 10:20 am by David Farrar

Well, this is surprising. The Herald reports:

Mr Harawira said he “hated to say it” but he admired Mr Key for choosing to be the “bigger man”.

“In my view he is to be respected, that in the face of opposition – some of it quite strident – he chooses to come back year after year.”

Key’s response is the right one, in my opinion also. The PM should be at Waitangi on Waitangi Day.

However I have been of the view for some time that we should have a New Zealand Day, as well as a Waitangi Day.

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OU Vote Chat

October 27th, 2011 at 7:00 am by David Farrar

I didn’t realise that the interviews with different politicians as part of the OU Vote Chat 2011 were on You Tube. You can view the channel here.

The most viewed one so far is Part I with Hone Harawira. I’ve listened to many of them. Bryce has a good interviewing style, where he lets the pollies talk, but also comes back to stuff they gloss over.

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Maori MPs on Shane Jones

October 5th, 2011 at 4:00 pm by David Farrar

This transcript is from Marae Investigates after they reveal that 47% of Maori said Shane Jones should replace Phil Goff as Labour Leader, with only 31% disagreeing:

Shane Taurima: Shane Jones, do you like that question?

Shane Jones: I’m reminded of what they used to say about J.T and Winston so every time you talk about leadership ambitions you can rest assured there’s a chain saw behind you cutting you as you speak, so I’ll just Taihoa.

Not exactly the normal “I am loyal to our leader and he is doing a good job” line.

Shane T: OK Tariana Turia, outgoing MP Miti Ririnui said this week that Phil Goff couldn’t relate to Maori and our polls have shown that and Labour needed a new leader.

Tariana: First of all I think they need a remarkable leader that can bind them together in their caucus because that is not happening so they need to consider that.  Whether it should be before the election or preparing for the next election and going for the long Term I think that would be their best bet, 7 weeks out from an election not a good idea to replace the leader, it’s happened in the past with them, they had Palmer, then Moore, then Helen in a short space of time. It’s not a good time for them to be imploding so they do need a remarkable leader (Shane – is that Shane Jones?) I think Shane Jones would make a remarkable leader, he’s intelligent, he’s got all the ability that a Labour caucus would need, he’d do far better if he was in a maori Party (Shane – is that an open invitation … much laughter all round)

Shane J

Thank you Tari but I’m in my waka and it’s called Te Roopu Labour.

High praise for Jones from Tariana.

Shane T: Hone, could you work in a Labour Party led by Shane Jones?

Hone: First of all in respect of Shane, I think he’s the most capable politician there in both Maori and in English, sadly I don’t think that they will want to make him the leader because I know a lot of the gays don’t like him, the women are pissed off with him because of the incident that he got involved with not so long ago and also because I suspect that Labour is still inherently racist and don’t particularly want to have a maori as a leader, however when the day comes, in about 2097, I’d be more than happy to work alongside him. 

And high praise from Hone also.

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