Tension in Mangere

May 10th, 2012 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

Michael Field at Stuff reports:

Labour’s MP Su’a William Sio is facing a rebellion from a big group of his own Samoan people who plan to stand their own candidate against him.

Sio, who holds the seat with a 15,159 vote majority, recently went on ethnic radio and spoke out against fundraising efforts by Samoan groups in his electorate.

Many, mainly church groups, routinely visit to raise money from Auckland Samoans.

Sio said the fundraising was an economic burden on Samoan families in New Zealand.

His comments coincided with a fundraising bid by the people of Safotu, in Savai’i, who were in Mangere to raise money for hospital improvements.

Around $110,000 was raised for the hospital that serves 50,000 people in the powerful Gagaifomauga political district in , which has three seats in ’s parliament.

According to the Talamua news website (www.talamua.com) Sio’s comments outraged one of Gagaifomauga’s tulafale, or orators, Tuilo’a Anetele’a.

He called on all descendants of the Gagaifomauga district who were eligible voters for the Mangere seat not to support Sio anymore, and in the 2014 election.

“Rather, we will find a candidate to support and to run orator against Su’a in the upcoming general elections,” he told a large gathering in Mangere.

I have to say I don’t think Sio’s comments were unreasonable. It is good to give, but when it becomes an expectation it can prove difficult for some families in New Zealand. It is all about a balance.

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17 Responses to “Tension in Mangere”

  1. kowtow (8,475 comments) says:

    There is the patronising attitude to Pacific folk by the NZ mainstream.(John Campbell etc)

    “It’s a burden on the poor little darlings”

    Assumption,Samoans etc are poor things who can’t look after themselves and give charitably as they chose.Subtext (church bad)

    To all you lefty ,trendy cafe latte types,this is the multicultural society that you pricks are always telling us to celebrate and embrace,so get over it.

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  2. Shazzadude (529 comments) says:

    I reckon a lot of Samoans would privately agree with Sio. There is an almost forced expectation that one must give money back to their families at home-even if their family back home enjoy low or no rent, sunshine all year round (so heating isn’t a huge issue), and free food from the trees and sea.

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  3. Nostalgia-NZ (5,206 comments) says:

    Part of life DPF, and their choice.
    I attended a funeral in Mangere 2 weeks ago for one of last ‘mommas’ of her generation to die. Church full, babies gurgling and sometimes crying, the main Matai attending in a wheelchair, 3 ministers speaking so much had the dead woman reached into her culture with kindness. People crying and happy at the same time, expressing themselves. I know $100,000 was raised behind the scenes incredible as it seems.
    Good on them for loving their own people and showing it in their own way.

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  4. flipper (4,065 comments) says:

    I made my first visit to Samoa in 1970.
    The lines at the Apia Post Office waiting for their money orders to arrive from NZ were a depressing sight.
    Methods may have changed but the “what is yours is also mine” culture has not.
    Until two years ago I had a Samoan son-in-law, so I know. Apart from the “what is yours is also mine” attitude (that cost me a small fortune in requests for Samoan family funeral feast and general support) he was an amiable fellow.

    It is also interesting that impecunious pasifika families are “persuaded” to build and support million dollar church campuses (including ministries).

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  5. David Garrett (7,278 comments) says:

    Sio is a good guy, and good on him for speaking out…the churches were a force for bad in the Pacific since the palagi missionaries first arrived and told them how “sinful” they all were, and how they would go to hell if they didn’t obey the dogma….now the Ministers are all brown, but the message remains locked in the 19th century…little changed from when Victorian puritans brought it to them…

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  6. dime (9,972 comments) says:

    DG – its sad how they are constantly tapped for cash.

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  7. tvb (4,422 comments) says:

    The problems will go much deeper than this. Phillip Field had a tighter grip on the electorate. I bet the labour leadership has not one damn clue what the problems are

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  8. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    It’s a bit like seeing Bro’town as a documentary. Eventually the community will mature out of the grip of these leeching. Probably this will happen naturally and I’m not sure there’s much anyone can do to speed up the process.

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  9. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Yeah tvb, Field would have been dead against donations going to anyone except himself!

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  10. Nostalgia-NZ (5,206 comments) says:

    David Garrett

    So are the PI’s just dumb. 1000s upon 1000s of them, many with degrees getting the wool pulled over their eyes?
    I went to a Matai ceremony in recent years, a large number of new Matai and a lot of money raised, the excess of which was donated to the local schools. That was probably particularly dumb with interest rates that were being offered at the time by some NZ financial institutions since gone bust.

    I’ve seen the other end of it, young unmarried parents without the normal gifts of money to pay for the funeral or the Minister because they were unmarried when a baby was stillborn.

    There are other trends being resisted such as the requests for no fine mats at funerals on occasion.

    Sio could simply be getting the message that the culture is stronger than his political aspirations, and need to be told by an elder that there has been some misunderstanding as to what he said.

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  11. Nostalgia-NZ (5,206 comments) says:

    mm
    10.44

    Go out and save them, I’m sure they’d appreciate your efforts – them being fully unaware of what is happening.

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  12. kowtow (8,475 comments) says:

    dg

    Why not allow the dumb Islanders speak for themselves on those evil missionaries?

    Perhaps they do witnessed by packed churches at home and abroad and proudly ,unashamedly displays of Christian traditions held firmly.

    Can’t have that can we,got to have the Fields’ and the other foreigners still saying what’s good for ‘em ,but just with a post modern,libertarian,anti Christian slant,eh?

    No different to the evil missionaries are we?

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  13. immigant (950 comments) says:

    Pfffww.. Pacifikan problems.

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  14. Shazzadude (529 comments) says:

    “Sio is a good guy, and good on him for speaking out…the churches were a force for bad in the Pacific since the palagi missionaries first arrived and told them how “sinful” they all were, and how they would go to hell if they didn’t obey the dogma….now the Ministers are all brown, but the message remains locked in the 19th century…little changed from when Victorian puritans brought it to them…”

    I agree. Unfortunately the onus for change is on the backs of the ministers-however the ministers are the ones who have the strongest motivation not to change the system. It’s good to see Sio stand up and take this stand, when the easy thing to do would be to sit back and say nothing-as long as he has a Labour rosette he’s got Mangere locked up.

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  15. Nostalgia-NZ (5,206 comments) says:

    The money being raised was for a hospital not a church but don’t let small details get in the way of being patronising.

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  16. wikiriwhis business (4,002 comments) says:

    Pacific Islanders have left Liarbour in droves. At Goffs election night speech there were thousands present. No there weren’t which is usually the case for Liarbour on election nights. Liarbour has lost it’s Auckland strength base

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  17. wikiriwhis business (4,002 comments) says:

    ‘The money being raised was for a hospital not a church but don’t let small details get in the way of being patronising.’

    If terroist attacks are really thought to be high priority where aren’t more hospitals and care centres being built instead of jails ??????

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