The Beast appeals

August 9th, 2012 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

I heard on the radio the Beast of Blenheim is appealing against his supervision terms. Here’s what he wanted and what he got, from Stuff:

 The man known as the Beast of Blenheim wanted to travel around New Zealand in a campervan after being freed from prison on September 1.

Can you imagine anything less appropriate. I hope “Over our dead body” is an allowable response from .

However, the board has imposed 17 special conditions on his release, including one that will make him the first child sex offender to be tracked by a global positioning system (GPS) on parole.

He will be forced to live in a $70,000 relocated state house on Whanganui Prison property, which is yet to be moved. Resource consent for the two-bedroom house is expected to be ready in time for his release.

Whanganui was chosen because it is one of only a few towns in New Zealand where Wilson would not be close to any of his victims.

You do have to feel sorry for the locals. It is like the reverse of winning Lotto. At least he is very recognisable, so kids and women can be warned about him. Hopefully any farm animals will kick him in the nads if he tries anything with them.

“We think the decision to locate him here on prison grounds almost 10km from the perimeter of the nearest population base, it just kind of made sense.”

Best of a bad situation. I suspect he will break his conditions early on, and at least he’ll be close to the prison where he may hopefully then spend the rest of his days in.

Tags: ,

36 Responses to “The Beast appeals”

  1. Pete George (23,798 comments) says:

    I hope “Over our dead body” is an allowable response from Corrections.

    I thought you were referring to the campervan and his body for a minute.

    This is an awful situation, with an awful person. I’m generally against throw-away-the-key type sentences, but not always.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  2. krazykiwi (8,040 comments) says:

    travel[ing] around New Zealand in a campervan

    This is probably a self-preservation move. The beast with a home address conjures up sitting duck imagry.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  3. David Garrett (7,700 comments) says:

    This guy, and half a dozen others such as one Lloyd McIntosh, are why we need 1) legislation allowing continued detention of certain individuals beyond their sentence end date, and before they create new victims; and 2) an appropriate facility in which to hold them…INSIDE the wire not outside. This bastard will reoffend for sure.

    And before someone points is out: Yes, my attitude may well offend the libertarian wing of the ACT party, and I don’t give a hoot.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  4. krazykiwi (8,040 comments) says:

    Oh, and let’s make his home street address ‘666 Hades Row’

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  5. jaba (2,146 comments) says:

    it must be moments like this that make lawyers either scream in frustration that they represent a evil bastd like this or rub their hands with glee ..$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$4

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  6. alex Masterley (1,535 comments) says:

    It is more at the screaming with frustration end of the continum.
    Both, the stated intention to appeal and the fact that at some stage in the future he will be free to go about without an extended supervision order.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  7. Cobolt (95 comments) says:

    I suspect he will be much safer under these conditions. Let him wander about on his own for 10mins and see what happens.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  8. nasska (12,100 comments) says:

    Possibly worth noting that the “Dom Post” quotes a farmer who lives next door to the prison as not being really worried. If he has sufficient faith in the prison authorities it seems likely that Wanganui’s leading citizens are engaging in a bit of grandstanding.

    What matters most is if Parliament & the MoJ have learnt anything from the mess & whether they consider ‘worst possible cases’ when they are drafting the next piece of crim cuddling law encouraging finite & minimal custodial sentences.

    I understand that preventative detention would now be an option if another “beast” came up for sentencing. Would David Garrett like to confirm that the law has actually been changed?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  9. gonzo (6 comments) says:

    Over many millennia communities have collectively determined when the acts of individuals have been significant enough to exclude them from the community (and “exclude” takes many forms).

    Clearly this man has exceeded our collective limit.

    I suspect our determination in this case is life (or rather death) in jail. Sometimes the justice system doesn’t match up. And we are a pretty liberal society. He will end back up in jail. We all just hope it’s for a minor breach of conditions, and we hope that justice officials are taking all steps to catch him on one of these minor breaches.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  10. RRM (10,099 comments) says:

    Just die.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  11. David Garrett (7,700 comments) says:

    Nasska: Yes, preventive detention is now an option for a first offender. Graeme E is better placed than me to comment on PD – working as he does with thse chaps.

    I have just followed the link to the Stuff story. It beggars belief that Workman is bleating about the “lack of rehabilitative aspects” to the release plan. Man, that guy is something else…in his Christian mind – albeit one that doesn’t mind lying – EVERYONE is capable of rehabilitation, even Wilson, who is on record as saying he “couldnt give a stuff” about this victims or what conditions are placed on him.

    On planet Workman I wonder what you actually have to do to be considered beyond rehabilitation?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  12. lastmanstanding (1,310 comments) says:

    yet another case where the pinko soft cock liberals let the so called rights of one indiviudal trample all over the rights of the rest of society and the victims. With a bit of luck some of the locals will deal some real justice to him with extreme predjudice and save the long suffering tax payer more costs.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  13. Mark (425 comments) says:

    This guy should be locked up in a secure mental health facility until he is 100% cured, like they do in Texas.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  14. nasska (12,100 comments) says:

    Mark

    The lack of facilities for those who are mad as opposed to bad lies at the heart of many of the problems we face, especially revolving door prisons & lack of rehabilitation. Up until the 80’s there were places where people not suited for living in the community could be housed & treated.

    These were closed under the guise of promoting ‘community care’, a complete misnomer as the community is not in a position to do either successfully. The real reason was cost & mental health services being the Cinderella of Health, promised community assistance never materialised.

    Effectively there is now only prison or the street & neither serve the offenders nor the rest of us well.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  15. James Stephenson (2,266 comments) says:

    With a bit of luck some of the locals will deal some real justice to him with extreme predjudice

    Well it is Wanganui, so gang members won’t be immediately identifiable…

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  16. David Garrett (7,700 comments) says:

    Nasska: I quite agree with you…but your comment is misdirected in this case. Wilson is NOT mad he is very very BAD. In addition to secure treatment facilities for the criminally insane, we also need an instution – it would only need to be a small one – for guys like this.

    The former white collar prison at Ohura would be just fine – so long as a bloody big fence is built around it. The area needs a boost too.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  17. joe bloggs (126 comments) says:

    For once I agree with the Ned Flanders of the local Blogosphere, Pete George.

    I hope “Over our dead body” is an allowable response from Corrections.

    No David, the appropriate response is “over the Beast’s dead body”.

    As for Kim Workman’s bleating about the lack of rehabilitative aspects to the release plan, he’s playing the public for fools. It is only because this creep offended at a time when preventive detention didn’t apply that he isn’t still behind bars. This creep (I refuse to use his name):
    -has spent much of his early life in psychiatric institutions
    -has a fifty year history of offending,
    -continues to display significantly inappropriate sexual behaviour,
    -consistently denies all responsibility for his actions and has refused all forms of therapeutic intervention,
    -has been repeatedly assessed as a high risk recidivist
    -scores particularly highly on measures of sexual deviancy and sexual preoccupation
    -has been assessed as having a high level of psychopathic traits
    -and displays an extremely low level of concern for his victims (including his step-daughter, who he violently raped in front of his then-wife to demonstrate who was in charge of the household)

    This is not the story of a person who can be rehabilitated or who wants to be rehabilitated.
    Nor is it the story of someone who should be released from behind bars.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  18. cubit (190 comments) says:

    The decision of the High Court that was sought by Corrections gives an excellent insight into what this creep is all about. The facts stated in the case should not be allowed to get in the way of all the liberals who think he has served his time. One can’t help but sense the frustration that Corrections had with the options that were available.

    It makes good reading

    http://www.courtsofnz.govt.nz/cases/chief-executive-of-the-department-of-corrections-v-stewart-murray-wilson/at_download/fileDecision

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  19. nasska (12,100 comments) says:

    David G

    In Wilson’s case you’re spot on…preventative detention is a tailor made sentence for him & his ilk.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  20. joe bloggs (126 comments) says:

    Yes Cubit that decision is highly insightful, as are the Parole Board reports which pretty much echo Justice Lang’s comments.

    This guy spent most of his early life at Cherry Farm – due in part as I understand to severe damage of the prefrontal cortex – the sort of damage that is linked to significantly impaired decision-making, lack of empathy and problems with moral judgements – IMHO it’s impossible to rehabilitate for that; better for all concerned to lock the door and throw away the key.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  21. kowtow (8,938 comments) says:

    I got slagged off by lawyery types on the killing on bail post yesterday.

    I said soft bail was part of the left human rights campaign.

    Well this guy getting parole is all part of that human rights industry that has made life so easy for criminals at the expensive of the law abiding community and of course the victims of these brutal people.

    He should have been given consecutive sentences and this discussion wouldn’t be taking place.

    Aren’t human rights great?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  22. Jinky (190 comments) says:

    kowtow. This guy got the longest sentences ever for a person who hadn’t actually killed anyone and you’re still wanting more? he is on parole as he cannot by law be held past 1st september. Even Stephen Anderson who killed six people at Raurimu was out earlier than that. We have to do something with a man like Wilson and I think the Police, prison service and the Parole Board have done everything in their power to keep this man away from any potential victims of his predatory instincts. Human rights are great but they have to apply to everyone otherwise it;s just privilege extended to some and not others

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  23. Kea (13,559 comments) says:

    People far worse than Wilson are released into the community on a regular basis. The only reason the little dim-wits above are so shrill, is entirely due to the media beat up. It has nothing to do with the level of risk to society. Because he did not fake remorse, like many others do, certain people have tried to single him out. That is the real reason for all this fuss.

    He has served his time, it should end here.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  24. David Garrett (7,700 comments) says:

    Kea: got any kids have you? Any daughters?

    You’re an effing dickhead…and as those regulars here know, I very really stoop to ad homs…

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  25. snowy (108 comments) says:

    Jinky – Speaking of Anderson, It’s a fucking national disgrace that he was let back into the same community as his victims families, after barely over a decade in a looney bin.

    He murdered 6 people FFS.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  26. David Garrett (7,700 comments) says:

    How embarrassing…the damn thing wont let me correct the typo…”very RARELY stoop…”

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  27. kowtow (8,938 comments) says:

    He has served his time….so that makes what he did OK then?

    Got longer sentence than any one else ,wo fucken who, that makes him OK or absolves what he did?

    The people of this country are not soft on crime but our parliament and out of touch elites are.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  28. kowtow (8,938 comments) says:

    jinky

    human rights to do not extend to everybody.

    Convicted and incarcerated crims lose lots of their rights….though there are those who don’t like that and want to let them vote for example.A lot of folk don’t even like the idea of prison for felons (not due to cost but cos prison isn’t nice)

    This guy on parole has lost many rights and quite right too…. so human rights are not for everyone and nor are they automatic.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  29. Griff (8,419 comments) says:

    Bullet

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  30. big bruv (14,217 comments) says:

    Kea

    So if William Bell told us all he was really,really sorry for slaughtering all those people at the RSA would you favour letting him out?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  31. hj (7,165 comments) says:

    Joe bloggs:
    This guy spent most of his early life at Cherry Farm – due in part as I understand to severe damage of the prefrontal cortex – the sort of damage that is linked to significantly impaired decision-making, lack of empathy and problems with moral judgements
    ……..
    Kea

    He has served his time, it should end here.

    Dimwit.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  32. Kea (13,559 comments) says:

    “He has served his time….so that makes what he did OK then?”

    “Kea: got any kids have you? Any daughters?”

    These sort of comments demonstrate the level of thinking we have going on here. It is not actually “thinking” at all. It is simply an emotive knee jerk reaction, fueled by the media hype and the imaginations of the posters.

    I made no comment, and gave no indication, of what I think of the crimes he committed. The fact you have daughters, or not, does not change a thing.

    He has served his time. The enthusiasm for infinite torture, for finite crimes, probably appeals to Christians more than rational decent people.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  33. kowtow (8,938 comments) says:

    Call yourself rational kea,why bring Christians and torture to this? Rational pfft.

    Rational decent people? You’re an insulting prick.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  34. Kea (13,559 comments) says:

    Sorry to hear about your hurt feelings kowtow…..

    The reason I dragged Christians into this, is their belief in infinite torture for finite crimes. It is a fundamental part of their teachings. You may have heard of “Hell” and all that?

    Yes I am stirring, but I stand behind my comments.

    For all its worth, I feel much the same about Wilson as the other people here. I would happily put a bullet in him, but this is not an option. I struggle with the idea that we let someone out of prison, having served their time, and then continue to punish them because the media wants us to. The media are behind this, make no mistake. There are numerous people released who present a far bigger danger. Emotive reactions about “sex crimes” are not a reliable measure of risk.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  35. krazykiwi (8,040 comments) says:

    -has spent much of his early life in psychiatric institutions
    -has a fifty year history of offending,
    -continues to display significantly inappropriate sexual behaviour,
    -consistently denies all responsibility for his actions and has refused all forms of therapeutic intervention,
    -has been repeatedly assessed as a high risk recidivist
    -scores particularly highly on measures of sexual deviancy and sexual preoccupation
    -has been assessed as having a high level of psychopathic traits

    A unique CV. I can think of a political party that would look twice in their hunt for a new leader :)

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  36. cubit (190 comments) says:

    The decision of the High Court that was sought by Corrections gives an excellent insight into what this creep is all about.

    The input from the psych probably goes some way to giving a hint to what he is caspable of. Make up your ow minds as to how well he is able to live as a normal rehabilitated offender.
    It makes good reading

    http://www.courtsofnz.govt.nz/cases/chief-executive-of-the-department-of-corrections-v-stewart-murray-wilson/at_download/fileDecision

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote