Changes to ACC and sexual abuse victims

April 30th, 2014 at 7:00 am by David Farrar

The Herald reports:

will pay for every cent of rape victims’ counselling as part of a major overhaul of its sensitive claims system later this year.

The corporation is bracing for a significant increase in the number of sensitive claims in the next six years as the stigma around sexual violence is increasingly broken down in New Zealand.

In response, it was planning an expanded, more flexible service which took into account the sensitivity, length of time, and cost of treating rape-related trauma. These changes were based on the recommendations of a highly critical independent review in 2010. …

ACC strategy manager for sexual violence Emma Powell said the overhaul would give victims more time, funding and choice.

“We are no longer going to be approving 10 counselling sessions here, or 10 there, we are actually saying ‘Here’s 12 months, you and your therapists … build a programme around the person’s needs … and that’s about providing a much more holistic approach’.

“We’re throwing away the calendar and throwing away the clock and just letting people focus on getting better.” …

At present, ACC funded counselling for rape victims but only up to $80 for a one-hour session. Counsellors often charged a “top-up”, or additional fee of up to $90.

Ms Powell said the corporation was concerned that this cost was putting people off a crucial service. Claimants were taking an average of 7.8 sessions despite being entitled to 16 sessions, or more depending on their circumstances.

Under the new service, ACC would cover the full cost of the sessions. The overhaul would also allow victims to shop around for a therapist who they felt comfortable with.

These are very significant changes. The estimated cost to levy payers is an extra $45 million per year.

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64 Responses to “Changes to ACC and sexual abuse victims”

  1. Mobile Michael (434 comments) says:

    Make the bastards who raped pay back ACC.

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  2. Kea (11,878 comments) says:

    Will they be offering counselling sessions to the numerous men who have had their lives destroyed by false rape allegations ?

    Or is the victim industry funding only available to accusers ?

    How will you qualify as a “rape victim” ?

    Will it require a conviction or will it simply require an accusation ?

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  3. big bruv (13,572 comments) says:

    Simple rule, if you fund an industry designed to permanently ensure that those who suffer rape remain victims then those victims will never be allowed to recover.

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  4. big bruv (13,572 comments) says:

    Kea raises a very good point, are females who make false rape accusations ever prosecuted?

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  5. kowtow (7,978 comments) says:

    Where’s the accident?

    This is an extension of Labour gender politics.

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  6. Kea (11,878 comments) says:

    The corporation is bracing for a significant increase in the number of sensitive claims in the next six years

    Really !!! Based on what ?

    Are we expecting the number of rapes to undergo a "significant" increase ?

    What data is this prediction based on ?

    Seems to me we should be funding prevention measures – now – to prevent this rape plague. Not picking up the pieces after the rampant raping begins. I must say this all seems at odds with the crime stats and trends though.

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  7. duggledog (1,439 comments) says:

    This is not what ACC is supposed to be for, and I really really want this shit to stop. By all means introduce another insurance for rape if you like, but I pay more for ‘accident insurance’ than I do for any of my other insurances, and I am far more likely to suffer loss of income from sickness than an accident (touch wood!).

    ACC is a f***ing rort and I had hoped National would introduce competition for it by now but no, they have dragged their heels on it like many other things. So we need another more robust party to put a steel rod in the National administration come September.

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  8. gump (1,557 comments) says:

    @Kea

    “Are we expecting the number of rapes to undergo a “significant” increase ?”

    ——————————-

    There’s a good amount of evidence that rape has a low reporting rate compared with other crimes. Because – unlike other crimes – the victims of rape and sexual assault are often too ashamed to seek help or treatment. It’s particularly a problem for men as they almost never report situations where they have been the victims of sexual crime.

    It makes sense to expect that the number of claims for counselling will go up if the sessions become fully funded. That’s just simple economics.

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  9. Tauhei Notts (1,652 comments) says:

    Taking into acccount that the difference between rape and making love is two minutes; this move makes it the most expensive 120 seconds in history.

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  10. Kea (11,878 comments) says:

    gump, yes possibly. But how did you gather the data on what we – do not know – ?

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  11. wreck1080 (3,821 comments) says:

    If someone steals my car, I am injured mentally by the loss.

    Surely, that should be covered too?

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  12. peterwn (3,216 comments) says:

    So this would be effectively funded from the employees’ levy – ie those people who actually work for a living. Not sure whether the late Sir Owen Woodhouse had this in mind. It makes me wonder whether the employees’ levy should be extended to all income including welfare benefits and superannuation.

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  13. prosper (141 comments) says:

    If it’s perceived as free there is always a higher demand. Additionally the definition of rape now is a lot broader than it was 50years ago. Councillors need to be able to grow their business.

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  14. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    Pity the writer of the article didn’t speak to the practitioners who are involved in the change.

    On the whole they are appalled with SOME of the changes, which see them all having to take on responsibility for the administration of claimants files, previously done by ACC. As usual, where there is good, there is also bad.

    Sexual abuse is no accident – it is a deliberate act by a very sick person – the victim of whom lives with the results of that behaviour for the rest of their life. Because it is incorporated into ACC, apart from criminal charges, the victims cannot sue the perpetrator for the harm (usually life long) that they have caused.

    Whilst at least the government is trying to address some of the issues involved, it is my strong belief that ACC should not be handling these cases at all.

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  15. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    @ Mobile Michael (370 comments) says:
    April 30th, 2014 at 7:08 am

    As long as sexual abuse rests with ACC, apart from being criminally responsible, they (the perpetrators) are not made financially responsible for the harm they caused. As I said above, sexual abuse is not an accident – its victims are not harmed by an unforeseen careless act – the acts performed upon their person are deliberate, willful and intended to cause harm and degradation.

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  16. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    @ Tauhei Notts (1,515 comments) says:
    April 30th, 2014 at 7:43 am

    120 seconds that can ruin a persons life – and the lives of their loved ones and those that have to live with the lifelong negative affects of being raped. Most recover to a certain extent, but frequently, when they least expect it, are faced with the effects of PTSD that can raise its ugly head at any time.

    Rape might be 120 seconds for the perpetrator, but its not for the victim.

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  17. duggledog (1,439 comments) says:

    Regardless, what we are now discussing is semantics.

    ACC should be for Accidents, hence ‘Accident Compensation Corporation.

    Rape isn’t an accident it is a crime and should never have become part of ACC’s remit

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  18. Huevon (211 comments) says:

    The election of a Labour/Greens govt is going to cause,extreme mental distress and suffering. Will ACC cover us for that?

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  19. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    Regarding the issue of false claims. Yes, they do happen, but not as much as they used to when there was a nice lump sum payment involved.

    Firstly, the claim is about injury, and in order for a person to receive assistance, they must first have to show evidence of that ‘injury’, which in most cases is psychological injury. Therefore, at the time of the alleged offence and the period afterwards, up until the time the claim is made, there must be some form of ‘dysfunction’ etc. Obviously others will have noted this, and therefore in genuine cases there are witnesses to this ‘dysfunction’ (for want of a better word).

    If, for example, a person is making a false claim, they would have to provide evidence of harm that did not exist – i.e. get people to vouch for signs of PTSD. Now I’m sure there are some that would be able to do this, but realistically, how many would that be?

    Secondly, what would be the point? No longer are lump sums paid out for ‘permanent mental injury’ for sexual abuse. Yes, counselling is paid, but really? Someone would fake a claim to get counselling to discuss the effects and fix the effects of an ‘injury’ that never happened? Not to mention at the same time being able to ‘con’ a mental health professional?

    Thirdly, only a very small amount of sexual abuse victims have or are claiming loss of income. Those are in the most severe cases where the ability to work is really affected. That sort of mental health damage would be REALLY difficult to fake.

    Initially the system may have been easy picking for some clever and vengeful people, but for at least the last ten years it has not been. There is absolutely no point in making a false claim to ACC – they are not permissible as evidence in any ‘vengeful’ court case, they do not provide lump sum payments, and the hoops and psychiatric reports and so on, make it so tedious that it really would not be worth the bother – easier to rob a bank if you are that way inclined.

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  20. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    @ Huevon (113 comments) says:
    April 30th, 2014 at 8:20 am

    Lets not forget, if they do win (highly unlikely) then at least 50% of the electorate would have to want that – are you against democracy?

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  21. RRM (9,670 comments) says:

    Rape is not an accident. It is a crime.

    I am all for the state on behalf of the community providing some decent support (including moral support) to the victims of crime, especially nasty physical assault type crimes.

    But there should be a separate agency that does this; it should not be part of the same Accident Compensation system that looks after those who’ve got injured at work, and it shouldn’t be funded via people’s ACC premiums. Anyone who owns a motor vehicle or works with tools is already carrying a lot of other people’s liability, we don’t need to add more.

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  22. Paulus (2,568 comments) says:

    As there is money involved now pushed by the Consultant industry we will undoubtedly see a massive growth of rape advice, as more rapes are revealed.
    We should watch for the Salem Trial Syndrome, like the Peter Ellis case.
    More American experts will now arrive as more money becomes available.
    Whilst sympathetic to rape cases this is not what ACC is for – note it’s name Accident Compensation Corporation.
    Cannot see an accident, but can see the need for more support for genuine victims.

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  23. dime (9,690 comments) says:

    I guess we have to pay for our awesome fun culture at some stage eh pg?

    The next few years will be boom time for these Councillors.

    What happened when we made physio free?

    Whats the incentive for some of the Councillors to actually get these victims off therapy?

    This cost will blow out big time.

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  24. igm (1,413 comments) says:

    If a PI commits this heinous crime it pays to do a runner, then their PM will try and influence the case when the offender is sentenced.

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  25. Kea (11,878 comments) says:

    Rape is an assault on the person. I ask why this form of assault is separated from other assaults in the law ? People can suffer horrific life changing assaults and not have these services available to them.

    I suspect Rape is a sexist charge that relates to a time when rape was seen as a property crime with a male being the wronged party.

    I advocate the charge of Rape being dropped and it being dealt with as an assault.

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  26. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    @ dime (8,815 comments) says:
    April 30th, 2014 at 9:01 am

    Actually Dime, I think you will find the opposite will happen. The article does not mention the changes made to the contracting system with ACC. From now on providers have to take care of the administration of the claimants, which was previously done by ACC. This means they have to have all sorts of registrations, and in most cases will need to employ extra administration staff etc. The process is extremely arduous, and a large majority of previous providers have refused to take part as they believe the administration for ACC claims should remain with the corporation –

    I agree with them, I think it is a dangerous precedent to have the providers ‘administer’ such things. No doubt, like most things the processes will continue to swing backwards and forwards, until eventually someone at the top actually realises that this is a victims matter, and NOT an accident and place these terrible crimes in an area that is better equipped to deal with them.

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  27. smttc (711 comments) says:

    Those of you questioning the categorisation of rape as an accident need to bear in mind that the Courts decided not long after the ACC scheme came into being that whether an event is an accident is to be determined from the perspective of the victim. Hence rape is an accident (ie unintended event) from the perspective of the victim. The intentions of the assailant are irrelevant.

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  28. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    @ Kea (10,747 comments) says:
    April 30th, 2014 at 9:15 am

    Are you suggesting that if a male was held down and sodemised by another or a group of males, he would find that no more mentally harmful than being punched ? Really Kea???

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  29. Kea (11,878 comments) says:

    an event is an accident is to be determined from the perspective of the victim. Hence rape is an accident (ie unintended event)

    So is a hangover or a drug overdose.

    At what point does a rape accuser become a “victim” ? Upon conviction, or is this money handed out based on unproven claims ?

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  30. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    @ Kea (10,748 comments) says:
    April 30th, 2014 at 9:25 am

    What money is handed out?

    There is no longer and hasn’t been for some time, lump sum payments made to claimants.

    Money is paid to service providers, the counsellors, psychiatrists etc – but directly, unless a person is unable to work (in which case the injury, even mental injury, has to be pretty significant) there is no great sums of money paid to the victim.

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  31. Kea (11,878 comments) says:

    Judith, the greatest damage from assaults is often psychological. Regardless of the type of assault.

    Not sure why you used homosexual sex in your example. Are you suggesting there is a prevelance of lesbian rape ?

    But to play YOUR game: Are you suggesting a male having sex with a woman is as bad as being beaten to a pulp ?

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  32. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    @ smttc (639 comments) says:
    April 30th, 2014 at 9:20 am

    Good point, and thought provoking. I still think that ACC should not be handling sensitive claims, due to their major bungling of these in the past – but do accept your explanation of ‘accident’ in these circumstances.

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  33. Kea (11,878 comments) says:

    What money is handed out?

    Judith, did you read the post ?

    The opening sentence: “ACC will pay for every cent of rape victims’ counselling ” …”more time, funding” …”$80 for a one-hour session. Counsellors often charged a “top-up”, or additional fee of up to $90.
    “…”ACC would cover the full cost of the sessions”

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  34. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    @ Kea (10,749 comments) says:
    April 30th, 2014 at 9:29 am

    There are all sorts of sexual assaults Kea, and whether you want to hear it or not, there are a large number of sexual assaults that occur on males as well.

    Of course physical assaults leave some forms of psychological damage, but this discussion is not about those, it is about the sensitive claims department of ACC which deals with sexual assault.

    The other types of assault are dealt with by a different area of ACC – they are NOT ignored.

    Sex and sexual acts have certain boundaries within ordinary society. Because of the types of society we live in, there are taboos etc regarding sex, which when broken cause a great deal of harm, especially psychologically.

    Rape, whether it be male/male, female/male, female/female, or group/single victim, is traumatic because of the loss of dignity, and power over the most intimate parts of the human body and the connotations we, as a society place on intimate acts.

    I have dealt with men who have remained silent about being raped as a child or adolescent because of the connotations involved in a male/male rape. Scared of being accused of being homosexual and so on, they have remained silent, and consequently developed some pretty awful behaviours from the frustrations involved. In most cases people witnessed a change in their behaviour at the time of the assault, but failed to investigate etc. Those men mostly failed to meet their full potential in life because of what happened to them, and because they felt if they had spoken out, they would meet with the same sort of attitude we often see – that their attack was no different to any other, and that they were somehow to blame.

    Like it or not, sexual assault is different, because of societal values, and therefore is more psychologically harmful.

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  35. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    @ Kea (10,750 comments) says:
    April 30th, 2014 at 9:32 am

    Yes, but its not paid out to the victim. According to you in many of the posts you have made in the past, the victim is often ‘fakeing’ it. My argument is, what would be the point?

    Why would a person want to fake something if there is no benefit to them? They don’t receive money themselves, so they would be faking it, to be able to attend counselling sessions (which are paid for directly to the counsellor by ACC) in order to address the ‘injuries’ from a sexual assault that didn’t occur and therefore would have to fake the psychological harm – WHY would someone do that? Especially given that being an ACC claimant is not evidence in any related criminal investigations etc?

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  36. Kea (11,878 comments) says:

    Judith, yes I know all that. My ex wife was raped for years as a kid. She never complained to the Police. She never took the lump sum payout available, though others he raped did. Latter, when we were married for some years, she went through a bad time and did get funding for counselling.

    I have spoken with many women who have been raped and never reported it. They had no reason to lie to me. I know it happens.

    But this does not make the hysterical claims of feminists true and nor does it make false accusations less of a crime or less of a problem.

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  37. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    @ Kea (10,752 comments) says:
    April 30th, 2014 at 9:45 am

    Totally agree with this Kea. Many rapes do not get reported, especially homosexual rapes involving men, because of the connotations and shame involved. I don’t know the figures, but I would go so far as to suggest that the majority of rapes never get reported and people deal with them in their own way.

    However, as you as pointed out, a victim of rape or sexual assault, never knows when that act may present issues in their lives.

    Yes, you are right that some strong feminists groups take the whole argument too far, and hence do not do any favours for true victims of rape, which can be both male and female – in fact they do more harm, because actual victims are scared to speak out, for fear of being accused of being ‘anti men’.

    The whole sexual assault thing has not been dealt with effectively in my opinion in this country – I’m not sure what the answer is, but it certainly needs addressing in a different way.

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  38. dime (9,690 comments) says:

    Judith – cant be assed reading your posts :)

    bullet point it for me and i may cast my eye over it.

    i imagine is just says something about how much you hate john key and winston is the answer :)

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  39. nasska (10,917 comments) says:

    Judith

    Questions:

    1) Does counselling actually work? IOW does it restore the victim’s confidence & feelings of self worth or (as I suspect) provide a gravy train for overeducated meatheads who put out the shingle describing themselves as counsellors?

    2) Isn’t it likely that many of the above “professionals” will consider ACC’s largesse & keep counselling rape victims well past the point where the sessions are of benefit in order to maximise their income?

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  40. Jack5 (4,921 comments) says:

    ACC was a good idea, but the lefties and liberals are killing it by extending its coverage way beyond the original field of accidents. It’s also vulnerable now to the right, with PR campaigns in the MSM manipulating the corporation by allegations of privacy breaches, wrong decisions, and by other niggling. I’m thinking especially of folk who are claiming in the hundreds of thousands of dollars.

    Before ACC the country was on the road to death by over-infestation by lawyers, and settlements of claims over road accidents etc were backing up for years.

    Rape is not an accident. If the State should help victims, this should be through a separate organisation. With a gutless, gullible MSM, we need some way of blocking politicians of the middle and left pressing for extension of ACC cover, plus a way of stopping PR organised campaigns to manipulate the corporation.

    Otherwise, close it and live in a legal cobweb over infested with greedy spiders.

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  41. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    @ nasska (9,628 comments) says:
    April 30th, 2014 at 9:58 am

    Good morning Nasska, and a lovely morning it is too.

    To answer your questions – short reply, 1. Sometimes 2. Yes

    The long answer –
    Counselling only ever works if the ‘victim’ is open to change. That is, that they will benefit from ‘change’. For some, being the victim provides benefits – constant sympathy, people prepared to tip-toe around them, excusing poor behaviour and performance, just because they are victims. Being a victim can have its benefits (I’m going to get shot for that statement).

    However for some, the effects are devastating. I know of one woman who for years suffered PTSD that manifested as agoraphobia. She was unable to leave her home without suffering from debilitating anxiety attacks that actually saw her vomit etc, when in public. Hence she was unable to work – counselling enabled her to address her fears, learn coping mechanisms that stopped the attacks, and eventually enable her to be more sociable (although not as much as ‘normal’) but enabled her to return to the workforce. Without that help, she would still be stuck at home.

    Yes, in the past it has been a gravy train, although to be honest, a gravy train that many got off pretty quickly. ACC are notorious for not paying – sometimes taking over 12 months to pay accounts for treatment provided. They are also terrible at paper work and so on.

    Yes, again it is beneficial to have a client that hangs around for a long time – however, ACC does not give unlimited sessions. Sessions are awarded only in blocks of usually 6 – 9 sessions. If the client is not seen to improve in that time – then those sessions are not extended. If a client fails to improve at all, then ACC sends them for psychiatric assessment (a psychiatrist independent of the counsellor) to assess whether the person actually has a mental illness and therefore is not covered by ACC. Just check the courts for the numbers of people ACC have dumped (sensitive claims) and who are suing them for this action.

    Do the professionals keep clients past their effective point? Depends on the ‘professional’ – if they want to continue to be on contract to ACC then they will play the game the ACC way or be dumped. Which works both ways – some effective professionals have been dumped – as well as the bad ones.

    But the question could also go this way Nasska – is it not right that the more sensitive claims clients their are and the longer they hang around – the longer the ACC case managers keep their jobs and the more are employed, the more complicated the sensitive ACC claims are, the less people bother to question them, and the more people get employed – the gravy train has many carriages. ;-)

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  42. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    @ dime (8,819 comments) says:
    April 30th, 2014 at 9:58 am

    – Nought to do with John Key, on this particular issue he is trying, but I fear no one has the answer at this stage as its an historical mess –

    – and Winston is only the answer to Winston – never voted for him in my life.

    - and I don’t mind if Dime doesn’t read my posts – I’m sure his day will be just as delightful, with or without them! :-)

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  43. nasska (10,917 comments) says:

    Thanks Judith. I’ve never had much faith in yap as a cure for much but I guess, as you instanced, it occasionally has its uses.

    I still feel that counselling as a solution to anything is done to death…..a very expensive death.

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  44. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    @ nasska (9,629 comments) says:
    April 30th, 2014 at 10:22 am

    In my opinion counselling only works if the person wants it and is willing to make it work.

    As I have told people I have dealt with in the past – “you have a choice, you can be a victim or a survivor” (a bit of a cliche I know).

    - You can sit here are tell me how your life is ruined for months or years on end, or you can sit here and say ” I’ll be fucked if I’m going to give that prick the power to destroy my life – fuck ‘him’ – I’m going to be strong, powerful and prove that dirt like him don’t matter – I will not give him the attention he wants by giving him another minute of my life – I survived to live as a human being – he will always be just an animal”. In which case you get on with your life, all the better for being strong enough to overcome this.

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  45. Zapper (968 comments) says:

    Unfortunately, people in my family with mental health issues have made false accusations with the specific purpose of receiving ACC payouts. ACC should not fund this. These accusations have caused and are causing endless amounts of pain for all involved – there should be no incentive to accuse people.

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  46. Jack5 (4,921 comments) says:

    Do we really need so much counselling everywhere?

    The world got along well without counsellors for millennia, and indeed until fairly recently.

    With regard to rape, perhaps the women of Berlin showed another way to cope. Hundreds of thousands raped by the Red Army, and the victims said so little about it, that it was almost soon forgotten by those outside Germany. They showed immense character and courage in getting on with life and saying stuff all about their ordeal.

    Would they have been better off it had been possible to supply them with tens of thousands of counsellors?

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  47. wikiriwhis business (3,883 comments) says:

    “With regard to rape, perhaps the women of Berlin showed another way to cope. Hundreds of thousands raped by the Red Army, and the victims said so little about it, that it was almost soon forgotten by those outside Germany. They showed immense character and courage in getting on with life and saying stuff all about their ordeal.”

    Pffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff

    current context. We are not in WW2.

    I mean pleaseeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

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  48. wikiriwhis business (3,883 comments) says:

    “- and I don’t mind if Dime doesn’t read my posts – I’m sure his day will be just as delightful, with or without them!”

    Dime is the only self proclaimed and honest fascist on this site.

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  49. wikiriwhis business (3,883 comments) says:

    “ACC are notorious for not paying – sometimes taking over 12 months to pay accounts for treatment provided. They are also terrible at paper work and so on. ”

    They need to have half their billions stripped and given to Chch or the wider community.

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  50. Jack5 (4,921 comments) says:

    Wikiwiri, war is where the whole counselling business began – how to deal with shell shock as it first was called.

    Since then counselling has mushroomed. Every little disaster, the call goes out: fly in counsellors. When a police spokesman has bugger all he can say to reporters after a big mishap, he can say victims are being counselled, and folk can say to themselves, that’s okay then.

    Talk, talk, fucking talk!

    Don’t I recall an Edinburgh study that showed counselling sometimes worsened effects of trauma? Didn’t the Israeli military (are you reading Kea!!!) find that getting guys back into action quickly was better for shock trauma than taking them out and counselling them.

    Who did more for morale and mental effectiveness after the Christchurch earthquakes (sorry that was two years ago now, Wikiwirihis Business)? Sam’s student volunteers or counsellors? Sam’s student army, of course, by far.

    Wikirihis business: counselling is now a major industry. They even have a counsel council.

    We should rename NZ the land of the long trite yap.

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  51. wikiriwhis business (3,883 comments) says:

    “Make the bastards who raped pay back ACC.”

    Give ACC nothing. Pay the victims. Directly, fully with no administration costs awarded to govt depts.

    If rapists knew they would be paying their victims the crime would plummet

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  52. wikiriwhis business (3,883 comments) says:

    “Since then counselling has mushroomed. Every little disaster, the call goes out: fly in counsellors.”

    ever tried to get counselling after overseas trauma. Doesn’t happen. NZ embassies don’t want to know you.

    The family of the NZer killed in Sth America have probably found this out now.

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  53. Pete George (23,359 comments) says:

    Today Government have announced Budget 2014: Sexual violence services get funding boost

    Social Development Minister Paula Bennett and Associate Health Minister Jo Goodhew have today announced $10.4 million in new operating funding to support sexual violence services over the next two years.

    “This funding boost in Budget 2014 will provide immediate stability for the specialist services providing vital support for New Zealanders and their families impacted by sexual violence,” Mrs Bennett says.

    “It is a basic right that people should feel safe and secure and free of fear, which is too often taken away from people through sexual violence.”

    “The sector requires extra resourcing, especially around the availability of 24/7 crisis call-out and emergency counselling services.”

    The extra funding will include support for:

    – Frontline crisis-response services.

    – Community-based treatment services.

    – Services for male survivors.

    – People accessing medical and forensic services.

    “We’re committed to providing the right support for those working with both victims and perpetrators of sexual violence, so that when someone comes to them for help they can provide it,” Mrs Goodhew says.

    “This funding, appropriated to Vote Health, provides a shot in the arm to address current funding issues.”

    “This is alongside work the Government is doing with the sector on a cross-agency, long-term strategy to make sure sexual violence services are high quality, well-run and sustainable,” Mrs Bennett says.

    This includes the development of a nation-wide prevention package, and a committed focus on improving sector development, funding and governance.

    “It’s important the sector has financial certainty now, in order to have the security and time to best consider what the long-term approach will contain.”

    http://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/budget-2014-sexual-violence-services-get-funding-boost

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  54. Kea (11,878 comments) says:

    Jack5, counselling is too often used as a vehicle to shape peoples minds and socially engineer society from a radical feminst perspective. I think it often does more harm than good, though some reportedly benefit from it, I consider them a minority.

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  55. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    @ Zapper (849 comments) says:
    April 30th, 2014 at 11:21 am

    ACC have not given payouts (lump sum payments) to victims of sexual abuse for many years. They pay for treatment and they pay for loss of wages if the mental damage is so great that they are deemed unable to work (and the test for that is very very high), so I am not quite sure how your family have received money, if they are recent cases.

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  56. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    @ Jack5 (4,257 comments) says:
    April 30th, 2014 at 11:29 am

    he world got along well without counsellors for millennia, and indeed until fairly recently.

    Did it though?

    In past societies religious belief and traditions acted as a means to seek solace and talk about such things, sort of a type of counselling (see the meaning and origins of ‘to counsel’) – today, in secular society, where individualism is embraced and family’s are insular, there is not the opportunity to talk over your problems/issues with other people. However, having said that, more free time and less physical activity makes it easier for people to spend time thinking about the issues they have.

    Other aspects of past societies also limited people suffering – in some cases rape was an expected and approved part of society if conducted under the right circumstances (Lord to serf and so on). When it is not deemed a ‘filthy’ act by all in society then the after affects are not as severe for some.

    It is very difficult to compare historical situations of abuse to current – you have to look at the moral base of any given society within the context of that time -

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  57. Kea (11,878 comments) says:

    In past societies religious belief and traditions acted as a means to seek solace and talk about such things – today, in secular society, where individualism is embraced and family’s are insular, there is not the opportunity to talk over your problems/issues with other people.

    Except for the little boys violently and systematically raped by Clergy all over the world. Not sure the Church encouraged the victims to “talk about such things ” though Judith !

    Popcorn ;)

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  58. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    Jack5 (4,257 comments) says:
    April 30th, 2014 at 11:40 am
    Wikiwiri, war is where the whole counselling business began …

    No it wasn’t. Counsellors in various forms have existed throughout human existence. People often sought certain members of society to talk over their problems with – some in ancient society even charged for their ability to ‘counsel’ others in the wise ways of the world.

    Terribly sorry Jack, but you are wrong on this one – whilst I agree that the term/job role has become more visual – it has always existed in various forms from religious to secular societies, and indeed all types of human society.

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  59. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    @ Kea (10,761 comments) says:
    April 30th, 2014 at 12:54 pm

    No, they certainly didn’t encourage talk – except for our new Pope who seems to be a new breed of religious leader, and one I admire (even though I am not religious).

    I think many of the problems we have such as sexual abuse are made worse by the fact that families do not have ‘heads’ or elders/wise people to talk to and seek counsel from. People are forced to go to strangers for advice, being unable to share their problems with those that in the past were viewed as the wise ones.

    Just another symptom of a society on a one-way voyage – in my opinion.

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  60. Jack5 (4,921 comments) says:

    Judith posted at 12.55:

    Counsellors in various forms have existed throughout human existence.

    Counselling perhaps in the friends or family providing comfort or advice, but not counsellors in the present form. Where do you read in the Bible or ancient stories of counsellters being shipped in to console victims? At Troy? Jerusalem? Rome?

    Today’s counselling industry is a con on a scale matched only by the PR industry.

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  61. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    @ Jack5 (4,258 comments) says:
    April 30th, 2014 at 2:10 pm

    Yes, in fact you read quite a bit in historical accounts of the village ‘wise man’ (sometimes the clergy) who listened to the troubles of the people, and accepted ‘goods’ for his/her time. Some females, were accused of being witches because they offered ‘unwise counsel’ to troubled persons, who were often treated with ‘cures’ currently practiced by registered counsellors, such as ‘tapping’, alternative herbal treatments e.g. St John’s wort for depression and anxiety. Almost every village had a person of sorts that was available to others, and respected as the person with whom to share ‘your troubles’ too help ease worries and stress.

    That we should need counsellors today is a sad indication of the type of society we live in. No one should have to seek assistance from a total stranger or an organisation in order to be helped – but they do – and increasingly so because friends and family and the community no longer provide what they once did.

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  62. Steve (North Shore) (4,525 comments) says:

    Slightly off topic, but it has been 5 years now since my injury which ACC refused to cover the second surgery. Four reviews turned down but I am still here.
    There are so many claims that should have been approved (18000?) and now the waiting list for action is decreasing for me
    See you in Court soon

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  63. Judith (8,467 comments) says:

    @ Steve (North Shore) (4,343 comments) says:
    April 30th, 2014 at 6:48 pm

    Go get em Steve! After all, its a service you’ve already paid for with your ACC levies – sadly they seem to work on the principle that if you are persistent enough to survive several reviews, then you are serious about needing assistance.

    Thank goodness the ACC employees don’t actually conduct the operations, or they’d abandon the patient half way through and no one would survive.

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  64. simonway (375 comments) says:

    What does the increase matter to you, DPF? Based on what you said about ACC funding for families of suicide victims, I would expect you’d be opposed to funding for this sort of thing at all. Your words:

    But we must change ACC from being a universal funder of everything bad that happens to someone, to what it was set up for.

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