Socialism in France

November 3rd, 2012 at 12:54 pm by David Farrar

The Guardian reports:

He has now broken the record as the most unpopular French president at the six-month mark of a mandate. Only 36% of French people have confidence in Hollande, according to the latest poll by TNS-Sofres for Le Figaro magazine. By comparison, the rightwing Nicolas Sarkozy had 53% approval ratings six months after his election in 2007.

Normally the first six months are a honeymoon. This is unprecedented.

By contrast, Hollande’s opinion poll nose-dive is not about personal animosity – he has kept up his image as a modest president – it’s his politics, specifically his way of doing politics, which is under attack. The Socialist leadership and government is seen as confused, accused by its opponents of amateurism and inaction. Even the leftwing daily Libération recently dubbed Hollande and his prime minister Jean-Marc Ayrault “The Apprentices”.

Coming to a theatre in NZ in 2014 possibly :-)

Hollande and Ayrault are pushing through ’s harshest budget for 30 years – and despite telling voters that nine out of 10 of them wouldn’t feel the pinch of higher taxes aimed mostly at the rich and big business, public opinion clearly does fear it will feel the pain.

The proposed taxes are a 75% top income tax rate plus increases to capital gains tax to over 50%.

Tags:

27 Responses to “Socialism in France”

  1. Redbaiter (9,080 comments) says:

    So when are we going to see John Key’s National Party speaking out against and rebutting socialism here in NZ??

    As the party’s founding principles specify?

    Oh that’s right, little bucket list PM Johnny (I made it Mum) Key is too busy being absolutely popular to articulate any real message to the voters…

    National Party founding principles 1936-

    “To promote good citizenship and self-reliance; to combat communism and socialism; to maintain freedom of contract; to encourage private enterprise; to safeguard individual rights and the privilege of ownership; to oppose interference by the State in business, and State control of industry”.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  2. krazykiwi (9,186 comments) says:

    The proposed taxes are a 75% top tax rate

    With decades of creeping Euro-socialism starting to be ‘addressed’ by rich-prick envy taxes… surely NZ could set up as a country welcoming those with capital and expertise who are being economically persecuted by their own governments.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  3. Pauleastbay (5,035 comments) says:

    When those pesky frogs try and invade Red the Prime Minister will combat it.

    The french have behaved like arseholes for hundreds of years to everybody, so anything that comes their way is deserved.

    And reading ‘the principles’ nothing seems to have changed much only the enfeebled believe they have.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  4. Pauleastbay (5,035 comments) says:

    as long as they don’t have slanty eyes Krazy they should be able to set up here no problem

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  5. Nigel Kearney (1,016 comments) says:

    My thoughts were exactly the same as krazykiwi’s. The NZ govt should be running big ads in the French and other papers inviting anyone with money to invest to come to New Zealand and enjoy our ‘low’ top tax rate of 33%. As a bonus, they will also be able to express opinions on controversial issues without having to worry about being arrested.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  6. Redbaiter (9,080 comments) says:

    Wrong.

    Most capitalists from Europe (today anyway) are crony capitalists.

    Big government worshiping frauds.

    I wouldn’t bring any of them to NZ, or in the end we’ll end up just like France.

    (Well, we will anyway, its just that we don’t need the help of the same people who hold to the same ideas that are behind the collapse over there. We’ve got too many natives who think in that destructive way as it is.)

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  7. tom hunter (4,887 comments) says:

    The title of the post should actually be Statism in France, because that’s what the place has been about for 200 years plus, long before Marx put his ideas to paper.

    As such the French people just voted for a guy who’s a bigger statist than the other guy – and now they’re complaining. To his credit Hollande did not hide any of this from the voters during the election. What we’re seeing here is not a failure of Hollande but a failure of statist ideas, of which socialism is just one type.

    There was a terrific analysis of this just the other day in the American – and specifically the Californian – context: Why Liberals Think What They Do:

    Obama himself apparently has given up on liberal ideas in lieu of Big Bird, binders, bull****ter, movie stars, and hip-hopsters, which prompts the question: does anyone believe in liberal ideology anymore — and if so, why?

    Did California’s redistributive elite really believe that they could all but shut down new gas and oil production, strangle the timber industry, idle irrigated farmland, divert water to the delta smelt, have 37 million people use a highway system designed for 15 million, allow millions of illegal aliens to enter the state without audit, extend free medical programs to 8 million of the most recent 11 million added to the population, up taxes to among the highest in the nation, and host one-third of the nation’s welfare recipients — and not have the present chaos?

    They believe it because so many of them are utterly disconnected from the reality of the consequences:

    A San Francisco professor, a Monterey lawyer, and a Sacramento bureaucrat do not know how hard it is to raise beef, grow peaches, find and pump oil and gas, and haul logs out of the forest and into Home Depot as smooth lumber, or what it takes to build a small Ace Hardware business. The skills needed to keep a 7-Eleven viable in a rough neighborhood, I confess, dwarf those of the classics professor.

    In the elite liberal mind, there is instead a sort of progressive Big Rock Candy Mountain. Gasoline comes right out of the ground through the nozzle into the car. Redwood 2x4s sprout from the ground like trees. Apples fall like hail from the sky; stainless steel refrigerator doors are mined inches from the surface. Tap water comes from some enormous cistern that traps rain water. Finished granite counter tops materialize on the show room floor. Why, then, would we need Neanderthal things like federal gas and oil leases, icky dams and canals, yucky power plants, and gross chain saws — and especially those who would dare make and use them?

    As with California, I wonder how many of those rich pricks now fleeing actually voted for Hollande. More than a few I would bet.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  8. hinamanu (2,352 comments) says:

    The only popular PM in any Eurozone nation would be Icelands who kicked out the bankers who stated this horrific mess from the beginning.

    And no one accused him of wearing a tin foil hat

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  9. hinamanu (2,352 comments) says:

    “National Party founding principles 1936-

    “To promote good citizenship and self-reliance; to combat communism and socialism; to maintain freedom of contract; to encourage private enterprise; to safeguard individual rights and the privilege of ownership; to oppose interference by the State in business, and State control of industry”.

    Awesum.

    We have gone from being subjects to citizens to now, consumers.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  10. Kea (12,841 comments) says:

    I have been to former communist countries. I have mates from communist countries. I have dated women from communist countries.

    I have never met anyone who claimed to be a communist, except for white middle class people living in a capitalist society and enjoying all the benefits that entails.

    I was discussing this with my East German mate last night. He said very few East Germans believed in communism and were party members.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  11. gazzmaniac (2,307 comments) says:

    The NZ govt should be running big ads in the French and other papers inviting anyone with money to invest to come to New Zealand and enjoy our ‘low’ top tax rate of 33%.

    A little known fact (well, not that little known) is that if you set up a trust in New Zealand with an offshore settlor and offshore beneficiaries, with no New Zealand income earning assets, then that trust is not taxed at all in New Zealand. All you need is a New Zealand resident trustee.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  12. Viking2 (11,484 comments) says:

    Coming to a theatre in NZ in 2014 possibly

    Well Cameron Bagrie from ANZ considers that France will tip over next year. A view I concur with.
    The only question is what will cause that to happen.

    That is no longer a mystery.

    Oil.
    The USA has become self sufficient in oil and gas porduction in the last year.
    What does that mean?
    Well it means lower cost of energy and therefore lower cost of production.
    It also means that the oil producers have lost their biggest consumer so they will shortly have a glut of oil. What does that do for them?
    Called cash flow. They will begin to hurt big time.
    France has much money invested and loaned from the oil states and no amount of tax is going to dig them out of that hole.

    Europe is China’s largets customer.
    Europe is going to crash and with it big chunks of the trade. China is going to be in production strife even with lower energy costs. Australia is China’s biggest customer. So guess who is going to feel the crunch in China. Less ore, less coal and so on.

    NZ will suffer from Australia and our recent emmigrants will be returning as work continues to dry up.
    China will continue to need food and timber. Arabs won’t be able to buy meat so meat prices will drop.

    Interesting senario.

    Nz will benefit from lower energy costs as well.

    Price of oil is all downhill.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  13. Manolo (13,828 comments) says:

    Coming to a theatre in NZ in 2014 possibly.

    And aided and made possible by Labour lite’s second term abysmal performance.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  14. Pauleastbay (5,035 comments) says:

    but V2

    surely you jest , my kids have been told by their teachers that we have used all the oil where has the ‘beast’ got its oil to be self sufficent….. , surely a school teacher wtih no accountibilty in his professional life would know these things with some degree of certainty.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  15. BlairM (2,341 comments) says:

    I think it’s a reminder to both politicians and their partisan supporters that most people don’t vote for politicians to endorse their world view. They vote on “the vibe”, as Dennis Denuto might say, and then they are genuinely shocked when the politician actually does all the crazy things they said they would do.

    Another reason why only net taxpayers should vote, and their number of votes should be proportionate to the tax they pay. ;-)

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  16. iMP (2,386 comments) says:

    Meanwhile in Socialist America, a very senior political analyst has called the US Election (which is on Wed NZ time).

    http://conzervative.wordpress.com/2012/11/03/washington-examiner-calls-us-election/

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  17. Yoza (1,879 comments) says:

    Viking2 (7,959) Says:
    November 3rd, 2012 at 1:55 pm: “The USA has become self sufficient in oil and gas porduction in the last year.”

    If this is the case then why is he US importing over 300 million barrels a month?

    http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/hist/LeafHandler.ashx?n=PET&s=MTTIMUS1&f=M

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  18. Viking2 (11,484 comments) says:

    Because it exports as well.

    Just like us.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  19. SPC (5,636 comments) says:

    The Economist has indicated a preference for Obama, joining Bloomberg of New York. Maybe returning to digging the hole that led to the GFC is not seen as a smart idea.

    Hollande would have been wiser to accept a limit on top tax rates to 50%. But maybe he sees that level as a normal rate and the current circumstance as exceptional – in which case he should have instead developed a one off wealth tax regime to apply on a year by year basis during any emergency.

    Why would anyone come here to earn our wages, just because of a lower top rate of tax? Those who would be better off, would come here to gain residence to set up a trust to hold their offshore investments – they would not pay any tax here (and they can do this now). How does this make us better off, apart from them buying up local property off willing sellers and spending money and paying GST?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  20. Yoza (1,879 comments) says:

    Exports = 3 million barrels approx per month ( http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_move_exp_dc_nus-z00_mbblpd_m.htm ), imports = 300 million barrels approx per month ( http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/hist/LeafHandler.ashx?n=PET&s=MTTIMUS1&f=M ).

    Hardly indicative of a nation “…self sufficient in oil and gas porduction… .”

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  21. SPC (5,636 comments) says:

    tom hunter raises the valid question – what is the GDP per capita, debt per capita and budget deficit per GDP in France compared to say the UK and the USA.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  22. Harriet (4,972 comments) says:

    “The human race divides politically into those who want people to be controlled and those who have no such desire.” — Robert Heinlein

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  23. SPC (5,636 comments) says:

    The GDP per capita is higher in France than the UK. And its budget deficit is currently much lower than in the UK – they have similar historic public debt. So which nation is struggling more?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  24. SPC (5,636 comments) says:

    Gross debt has reached 100% of GDP in the USA, this is above the rate for the EU – about 85% on average (Germany, France and the UK have this level).

    The EU nations are under pressure to reduce their deficits (Germany and France to set an example, the UK because their deficit is really large), but is the USA making much progress?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  25. Viking2 (11,484 comments) says:

    Come back in12 months and see. France will tip over. Put it in your diary.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  26. SPC (5,636 comments) says:

    No country in Europe would be at risk if they used Eurobonds to cover national debt – as those at risk would get lower debt cost under Eurobonds.

    If France is at risk, it is only via a banking crisis (and Spain is the greater risk). But Europe has already begun plans to sort out the banking threat. Germany is prepared to act in the case of banks.

    Of course German resistance to Eurobond cover of national debt would fold if their EU co-founder France was at serious risk.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  27. Key is our man (890 comments) says:

    “The proposed taxes are a 75% top income tax rate plus increases to capital gains tax to over 50%” – Get ready folks. The incoming Shearer-Norman-Peters-Harawira government will be implementing harsher taxes than these. They will tax anything that moves. NZ deserves them. Only when we hit rock bottom, we will realise the truth. So 2014-2017 – NZ learns and then moves on.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote