The Prosperity Index

November 6th, 2012 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

An interesting index called the Legatum Prosperity Index places NZ as 5th out of 142 countries. The breakdown by sub-factor is:

  • Economy 27th
  • Entrepreneurship 13th
  • Governance 2nd
  • Education 1st
  • Health 20th
  • Safety 13th
  • Personal Freedom 2nd
  • Social Capital 4th

So 5th overall is good. Norway is top and Finland 7th.

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48 Responses to “The Prosperity Index”

  1. smttc (638 comments) says:

    1st in education my arse.

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  2. fish_boy (152 comments) says:

    First in education. Why is this government so hating on the teaching profession again?

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  3. Longknives (4,051 comments) says:

    I suspect things mught take a nosedive once our shiny new ‘Constitution’ is implemented….remembering that the Treaty ‘Principles’ will outweigh any Crown law.

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  4. m@tt (535 comments) says:

    A good independent education system creates an intelligent, free thinking population. An anathema to most governments, especially our current one.
    Attacking the teachers, forcing a narrow focus on reading, writing and arithmetic, bringing in charter schools and creating large ‘economy of scale’ schools to break down lower level social interaction in education means the government can begin to exert more control over the education system.

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  5. Kleva Kiwi (267 comments) says:

    1st in education? More like 1st in brainwashing our children with left wing propaganda

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  6. loonybonkersmad (25 comments) says:

    … and this is how the education score is arrived at :

    Do children have the opportunity to learn? (% yes) 88.50%
    Are you satisfied with the quality of education? (% yes) 82.10%
    Girls to boys enrolment ratio 1.10
    Gross secondary enrolment rate 119.10%
    Gross tertiary enrolment rate 82.60%
    Net primary enrolment rate 99.30%
    Pupil to teacher ratio 14.50
    Secondary education per worker 3.10
    Tertiary education per worker 1.50

    I note that there is very little here about educational outcomes or achievement.

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  7. Griff (6,263 comments) says:

    A very similar result as to our international standing can be found in the OECD better life index
    http://www.oecdbetterlifeindex.org/#/10115111111

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  8. Longknives (4,051 comments) says:

    “1st in education? More like 1st in brainwashing our children with left wing propaganda”

    Overheard a mates young children talking the other day- “Do you believe in the Taniwha?”
    When I asked my mate about it he casually said “Oh yeah- the kid’s teacher has been warning them about the local Taniwha”..

    Got me thinking about the repercussions if that same Teacher had pulled out a bible in class…..

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  9. Kevin (1,122 comments) says:

    This is bullshit.

    Doesnt it make you suspicious that we always socre so low on social indicators but here we are being spun as somehow “up there”. the first thing to make you suspicous is the fact that scandinavian countries scored 1,2,3 – Scandinavia, the last rsort of a deperate socialist when they are loosing an argument.

    Scandinavia is having terrible problems now with crime, immigrants, alcohol, tax burden etc, from both reports and knowing people who live there. They have massive taxes but are now starting to go down the “targetted assistance” or “means tested” route just like has been so destructive here – where the people who work hard have to pay twice – once in their taxes and again in user pays.

    B-o-l-l-o-c-k-s. Home spun by some starry eyed lefty bureacrat.

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  10. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    Attacking the teachers, forcing a narrow focus on reading, writing and arithmetic,

    So we have to “force” teachers to do those things?

    The majority of teachers are horrible small people, worthy only of ridicule. They pollute the minds of vunerable children with their vile lefty hate. This needs to change.

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  11. Rightandleft (574 comments) says:

    Longknives,

    I agree that teaching about Taniwha in class is complete bullshit, but the fact is the Bible does come up in public schools quite often. There is a Bibles in Schools programme in operation around the country and many schools also allow the Gideon’s to come and hand out Bibles to entire year-groups and make presentations at assembly. My view is that neither Taniwha nor the Bible have a place in schools outside of being taught in a comparitive nature as beliefs certain cultures hold. There should be no advocacy for such myths or presentations by those looking for converts.

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  12. AndrewDickson (1 comment) says:

    I am most concerned about the Health result. With an ageing population, less funding and hospitals focussed first on costs and second on patients I can’t see it getting better.

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  13. Rightandleft (574 comments) says:

    Kea,

    It isn’t that teachers are being for forced to teach these things, it’s that standardisation could leave out other equally important subjects like those in the technology field or sciences.

    Obviously you have a very biased view of teachers so I have little hope of changing your mind. But those with a less one-sided view might consider that teachers are no different from other professions, filled with people with a range of political views. I know plenty of National voting teachers. It’s not like the lefty parties have been all that teacher-friendly when in power either.

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  14. TheContrarian (1,043 comments) says:

    Wow, RedBaiter is going to freak when he sees those euro-commies at the top of the list.

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  15. alex (298 comments) says:

    1st in education, so why is the government trying to adopt unproven and potentially damaging American education models?
    Everyone who is critical of us being awarded that place, did you do the study? Have you spent hours, or months looking at the data? No? New Zealand teachers are actually mostly pretty good.

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  16. Hamnida (905 comments) says:

    1st in education doesn’t come as any surprise to me.

    Think about your own experiences with the NZ education system – it’s hard to complain about the quality.

    We need to lift our economy through job growth. I know many people on this website don’t like full employment, but think about the positives:

    1. More people paying tax.
    2. Less people on benefits.
    3. Tighter labour supply and demand pushes wages up.
    4. Less crime.
    5. More ‘down and outers’ getting a chance in low paid jobs.
    6. Baby boomers feeling confident enough to retire, allowing new graduates into permanent positions.
    7. Etc, etc, etc

    Imagine a New Zealand with a world class public education system, near full employment, and all the outdoor activities we enjoy in this cultural and sporting paradise. It would be an even more amazing place to live.

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  17. Psycho Milt (1,988 comments) says:

    Economy 27th

    Education 1st

    Good job we’ve got a govt that thinks the economy’s doing OK but the education system really needs some work, huh?

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  18. Auberon (820 comments) says:

    As I suspected – socialist paradise. Shit economy, massive redistribution of what little there is to go round.

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  19. Hamnida (905 comments) says:

    Psycho Milt – I say we take the high moral ground. Torries will always try and run down public services by creating a false sense of crisis.

    The facts are of course different – 3rd or 4th in the OECD for Education (7th or 8th when the Education Minister adds non-OECD locations like Shanghai, Hong Kong and Singapore), and now a further survey ranking us as number 1.

    Instead of playing a blame game, I think all New Zealanders should work together and grow the economy through jobs for all.

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  20. Hamnida (905 comments) says:

    Auberon – Even I would admit there is no mandate in New Zealand for a socialist paradise. So I am suggesting we grow together through full employment.

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  21. Pete George (21,830 comments) says:

    An interesting opinion from Peter Lyons (economics teacher at Saint Peter’s College in Epsom) recently on critical thinking and education:

    Over the past few decades the vocabulary of corporatism has infiltrated our education system. Terms such as core competencies and key performance indicators litter the documentation of modern education.

    Recently, I sat in a staff meeting as we debated strategies to develop critical thinking in our students. The skill of critical thinking is embedded in our glossy curriculum documents.

    The irony is that students who are true critical thinkers are unlikely to survive our schooling system, let alone a modern corporate environment. True critical thinkers are probably sporting green mohawks and studs in their noses, navels and nads by the time they hit their mid-teens. They ask silly questions such as why should I wear this uniform?

    Critical thinkers are essential to social and economic progress.

    They challenge the status quo by constantly asking “why?” and “what if?”. But they are also a threat to those unwilling to be challenged in their beliefs. The fate of Socrates is a lesson for all.

    http://www.odt.co.nz/opinion/opinion/233287/questioning-challenge-critical-our-progress

    And a month ago Jim Flynn wrote:

    As I enter old age, I find myself moved to offer people a better education than I can provide within the structure of a university, writes University of Otago professor Jim Flynn.

    As Anton Chekhof said, “Man is what he believes.”

    The only liberated mind is a mind equipped to arrive at independent opinions and convictions.

    http://www.odt.co.nz/campus/university-otago/229041/professor-university-doesnt-teach-how-think

    We might have a world ranked education system, but we don’t want to just teach children, we need them to learn to think for themselves.

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  22. dime (8,789 comments) says:

    full employment. wouldnt it be amazing? im not sure how we get half the people on benefits to get off their asses. oh wait, they are all genuine :( :(

    you know what else would be amazing? free blow jobs. whenever ya wanted. a chick on every corner…

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  23. Hamnida (905 comments) says:

    Pete George – agree, Sir Bob Jones has some interesting articles on why he employs Arts graduates over Commerce ones.

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  24. hinamanu (2,352 comments) says:

    Where is growth in this country.

    If anyone can tell me I’d really like to know.

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  25. hinamanu (2,352 comments) says:

    The Hamilton City Council bought in Asian labour disqualifying Kiwi workers

    Burger King bought in Asian mangers because they said Kiwi’s can’t cope as managers ignoring thousands of unemployed graduates.

    When this country understands how corporations are drowning entrepreneurs we will get some insights.

    Not before

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  26. Hamnida (905 comments) says:

    hinamanu – Instead of exporting whole logs, why don’t manufacture furniture or send treated timber overseas?

    I know labour costs are cheaper overseas, but I believe a full cost/benefit analysis should be undertaken before exporting whole logs. Factor in: NZ having a reputation for producing high quality furniture to the emerging Asian middle class, tax take through jobs instead of paying benefits, more skilled workers, less crime associated with unemployment, etc.

    We don’t export raw wine grapes, instead we produce high quality wine with a strong international reputation.

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  27. Tharg (14 comments) says:

    Legatum is an strange crowd, and hardly a pack of lefiists trying to impose a socialist world order. The director, Iqbal Quadir has been recognised by the World Economic Forum for his work on mobile-phones in developing countries, and the funder and founder is reclusive billionaire Christopher Chandler. To be honest I don’t think much of the methodology on the education issue – and the question about satisfaction shows some odd results. For example, the group of high performing PISA countries – Finland, Canada, Japan and Korea have satisfaction ratings of 89%, 82%, 70% and 58% respectively, which is a huge range – while the countries that are often contrasted with them, in terms of going down a more market driven education route, the UK and USA are 86% and 65% respectively. Few easy arguments to be made by either side there then!

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  28. Grant (383 comments) says:

    Hey Hammy

    1. More people paying tax.
    2. Less people on benefits.
    3. Tighter labour supply and demand pushes wages up.
    4. Less crime.
    5. More ‘down and outers’ getting a chance in low paid jobs.
    6. Baby boomers feeling confident enough to retire, allowing new graduates into permanent positions.
    7. Etc, etc, etc

    All of the above could be achieved by the coercion that you are so fond of ? Not to mention your profound maximum wage policy?

    Yeah right

    G

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  29. Griff (6,263 comments) says:

    PG that is true
    In the corporate world and the job market they blindly value team identification when it often leads to group think not the innovation that marks a truly successful business or society.

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  30. dime (8,789 comments) says:

    “When this country understands how corporations are drowning entrepreneurs we will get some insights. ”

    umm your idea of an entrepreneur is a graduate who works at burger king?

    Factor in: NZ having a reputation for producing high quality furniture to the emerging Asian middle class, tax take through jobs instead of paying benefits, more skilled workers, less crime associated with unemployment, etc.

    NZ having a reputation for producing high quality furniture to the emerging Asian middle class – do we actually have that reputation? how big is the market? are we doing this now? why cant we export raw materials and the finished goods? if there is demand for our high end products then the jobs would still be here.

    tax take through jobs instead of paying benefits – how does that help the Dime furniture company?

    less crime associated with unemployment – i guess that means the Dime furniture company may not get robbed. but umm insurance??

    its not a private companies job to worry about these issues.

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  31. hinamanu (2,352 comments) says:

    AS I was saying

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/7911465/Rakon-to-cut-60-jobs

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  32. Hamnida (905 comments) says:

    dime – It was an example of one way of job creation. I often drive past ports and see us exporting whole logs. I think to myself, wouldn’t it be better to export high quality furniture or treated timber.

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  33. hinamanu (2,352 comments) says:

    “its not a private companies job to worry about these issues.”

    Another leg of the corporate takeover stealing vision and not producing

    “NZ having a reputation for producing high quality furniture to the emerging Asian middle class, tax take through jobs instead of paying benefits, more skilled workers, less crime associated with unemployment, etc. ”

    Excellent vision inspiring passes for drug tests and creating opportunity and diminishing domestic violence and child abuse

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  34. Pete George (21,830 comments) says:

    Hamnida – there’s a market for logs and wood chips. There’s minimal market for manufactered timber products. We can supply, but we can’t change what the rest of the world wants.

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  35. dime (8,789 comments) says:

    hamnida – some businesses probably are doing well in that sector. its just not big business. its niche business and sending logs overseas is far bigger business and a far bigger job creator, tax generator etc

    nothing wrong with taking advantage of cheap labour in china. nothing stopping a kiwi business producing the crap in china but keeping their office here, bringing profits home etc

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  36. dime (8,789 comments) says:

    “Another leg of the corporate takeover stealing vision and not producing ” – huh?

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  37. hinamanu (2,352 comments) says:

    @ Dime

    Aren’t insurance and private companies corporates?

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  38. hinamanu (2,352 comments) says:

    “Nothing wrong with taking advantage of cheap labour in china. nothing stopping a kiwi business producing the crap in china but keeping their office here, bringing profits home etc”

    Exactly the argument of Nike and Apple. Exporting jobs to the cheap Asian job market…. netting massive wealth and depriving their domestic market of huge employment opportunity while the wealthy shout at the unemployed to get a job like they grow on trees

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  39. dime (8,789 comments) says:

    “Exactly the argument of Nike and Apple.” – dam straight. we have access to education in this country. people can get off their asses and upskill.

    “netting massive wealth” – correct. for their share holders. ya know, mums, dads, retirement funds, Dime etc

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  40. hinamanu (2,352 comments) says:

    ““Exactly the argument of Nike and Apple.” – dam straight. we have access to education in this country. people can get off their asses and upskill. ”

    Absolutely. The govt of course is moving the goalposts to education and are seriously looking at the funds Polytechs attract. The Nat/Lab coalition will stratagise magnets to that income to govt coffers in the next term.

    As for mum and dad share holders benfitting from privatistion I have yet to hear the success stories and more disposable income flowing into the economy.

    I must say though, the amount of infrastructure being invested in the Hamilton economy is quite staggering. The word ‘boom’ could almost be implied.

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  41. dime (8,789 comments) says:

    “I have yet to hear the success stories and more disposable income flowing into the economy.” – Dimes portfolio is doing well :) theres a story for you!

    “Absolutely. The govt of course is moving the goalposts to education and are seriously looking at the funds Polytechs attract.” – so nothing has actually happened. anyone can still get a loan and do a course. its always “they are going to” with you conspiracy theorists.

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  42. thedavincimode (6,133 comments) says:

    1st in education?????

    I thought the whole point of our education system nowadays was to ensure that nobody came 1st in anything. We’re all winners.

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  43. hinamanu (2,352 comments) says:

    “its always “they are going to” with you conspiracy theorists.”

    well we all know what Paula Bennett did to learning opportunities betraying the very people she used to be

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  44. dime (8,789 comments) says:

    hinamanu – you mean people already living on WELFARE wont get free tertiary education as well? they will have to take a loan like the rest of us?

    if taking on a student loan stops anyone from study then thats probably for the best. cause they are either morons or wanting to study some dopey course.

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  45. Harriet (4,010 comments) says:

    ‘…There’s minimal market for manufactered timber products….’

    That’s crap Pete!

    I know of an American owned family business who build Mckitchens for Mcmansions in the US housing market and they have purchased land in several countrys including NZ around 2000.

    The reason for that was due to the fact that they wanted to secure a reliable wood supply for the next hundred years or so. They did/are planting in several countries so as their ‘long term investment’ is not ruined by pest, fire, flood, war etc.

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  46. hinamanu (2,352 comments) says:

    corporations no longer subjected to laws

    Just have to look at fuel companies. Govt s won’t touch them

    Edward Goldsmith explains the corporate takeover of governments and the global centralised planning being orchestrated by multinationals through the World Trade Organisation (WTO).

    Globalisation and Maori explores this corporate agenda through its impact upon the Maori of Aotearoa (New Zealand) and other peoples.

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  47. Fost (99 comments) says:

    RE: Log exports – The main reason is the transport – you can ship logs exposed in holds and on the deck of the logging ships – all splashed regularly with salt water and bashed around until it gets to its destination – but that does not matter to a log. Do that to actual furniture, paper or any other timber products, all you get is kindling or mush the other end.

    The reason just about all furniture you can buy, unless made locally is “flat pack” is that yacht fuel (air) is very expensive to send anywhere. My father once looked at bringing in hand carved, beautifully crafted, solid mahogany furniture from the Caribbean – local labour/material costs the equivalent of pine here in NZ, couldn’t do it – the transport cost was high (but justifiable – added about 150% to the cost) but is was the risk of damage that was far too high to make it worth doing.

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  48. OneTrack (1,979 comments) says:

    Hamnida and co are going to start a company making high quality furniture here and shipping it overseas and make a fortune. Oh wait, thats for somebody ELSE to do.

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