Bradford voted best Energy Minister

March 5th, 2013 at 2:00 pm by David Farrar

Energy News (paywall) reports:

It’s official – is the best Minister of Energy this country has seen in 45 years.

The eponymous architect of the 1998 reforms – which famously separated networks from retailing and completed the four-way split of ECNZ – received 23 per cent of the vote in our recent poll.

We asked readers to name the `best’ energy minister going back to 1977, when the former mining and electricity departments were combined into a single ministry.

“Good lord,” Bradford said by phone from Bangladesh last week, where he is leading a World Bank project to help improve the effectiveness of the country’s parliament. “I would have thought I would have been the most infamous.”

What is interesting is when you look at in the last 20 years.

The Bradford reforms clearly worked. Power prices dropped for around three years – something that had never happened before. Then Labour’s policies started to impact and prices soared.

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15 Responses to “Bradford voted best Energy Minister”

  1. berend (1,705 comments) says:

    National has been power for, a few weeks or so? Can’t expect them to have changed ANYTHING already.

    Let’s keep blaming Labour for the electricity price increases since 2008!

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  2. iMP (2,364 comments) says:

    I knew Max when he was soldiering thru the reforms. But the poll is probably more about what people can remember about energy and energy ministers, rather than inherent worth (no dis. to Max B.). Polls are blunt things, they tend to only register respondent awareness, which is why they usually get elections wrong. Max led the most dramatic changes, so people remember that.

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  3. Ross12 (1,410 comments) says:

    DPF , I’m no Labour supporter ( far from it ) but what policies are you referring to ?

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  4. RightNow (6,986 comments) says:

    berend, since 2008 that graph shows prices have risen about 4% over 3 years. Seems pretty good to me.

    +1 National.

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  5. RightNow (6,986 comments) says:

    Although, I didn’t (and still don’t) agree with the ETS, which probably accounts for the bulk of that rise, so I have to take that back.

    -1 National.

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  6. Manolo (13,580 comments) says:

    This is spin on steroids!

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  7. ross69 (3,652 comments) says:

    It’s great to know that there have been no price increases since 2010. Indeed, 2011 and 2012 don’t seem to have existed. Awesome graph.

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  8. burt (8,238 comments) says:

    But DPF – The price hikes under Labour were good because they increased government revenue… It allowed them to use about $0.40 from every extra dollar of revenue to pay out buying votes in welfare.

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  9. Bob R (1,363 comments) says:

    ***The Bradford reforms clearly worked. Power prices dropped for around three years – something that had never happened before. Then Labour’s policies started to impact and prices soared.***

    What reforms did Labour implement? I never understood how it made sense to divide up what is essentially a natural monopoly? Could it also be that after initial drops in price as companies sought customers that gave way to relatively uncompetitive behaviour and prices increases?

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  10. hamnidaV2 (247 comments) says:

    It is great to know power is cheaper thanks to Bradford.

    I noticed my power bills reduced significantly during the 1990s.

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  11. MikeG (425 comments) says:

    Of course prices dropped when Bradford’s reforms came in – it was companies trying to attract customers based on price. This was unsustainable (as was predicted) and prices then started rising. Doesn’t the right understand how the market works?

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  12. Innocent bystander (163 comments) says:

    First reaction when I read this was to wonder if Imperator Fish or the Dimpost had started ghost writing for kiwiblog…

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  13. Manolo (13,580 comments) says:

    Satire, pure satire from DPF.
    Even the most loyal Labour lite support would not be able to suppress a chuckle after reading it.

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  14. mavxp (479 comments) says:

    A shame the Maui gas ran out – around the same time the prices went up.

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b0/Mauigasfield.svg

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  15. ChrisM (103 comments) says:

    Don’t read anything into the poll. There were only 75 votes cast total and Hekia came 5th equal with David Parker (7 votes each). It reflects more the prejudices of the voters rather than a true judgement. Though there may be something to their judgement as Trevor Mallard was way down.

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