The new party rules are saving Shearer

July 16th, 2013 at 2:00 pm by David Farrar

listener shearer

 

This clipping is from The Listener.

Jane Clifton makes the valuable point that Cunliffe could win the party-wide vote but can’t get a majority in caucus to trigger it. Either of Robertson or Little could probably gain a majority in caucus to trigger a leadership ballot – but probably can’t win the party-wide vote. Hence you have the irony of the new rules put in place by the activists specifically to challenge Shearer, are in fact keeping him in the job.

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17 Responses to “The new party rules are saving Shearer”

  1. bhudson (4,740 comments) says:

    So either Robertson or Little could do a deal with Cunliffe to be deputy leader.

    Duncan Garner claims that Robertson is as eager for the leadership as everyone seems to think he is, but wants to wait until after they lose the election to take it.

    Which is an interesting possibility for the members and unions to consider – is Robertson sacrificing another election just so that he can get his hands on the leadership?

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  2. labrator (1,850 comments) says:

    is Robertson sacrificing another election just so that he can get his hands on the leadership?

    Makes perfect sense. Why take on the most popular prime minister in recent memory when he’s almost guaranteed not to take hit at a 4th term. Especially when the rest of the National party is void of anybody with charisma. The next Labour party leader is a shoe-in for Prime Minister.

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  3. Pete George (23,682 comments) says:

    Robertson let slip today in the Youth Palriament that he isn’t ready yet, he introduced himself as Deputy Prime Minister.

    Labour have a leadership vacuum, and the dust bag is stuffed with rubbish.

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  4. s.russell (1,646 comments) says:

    Hilarious! And Clifton is probably correct in her analysis.

    As for Robertson doing a deal, why would he? Being someone else’s deputy is no gain for him. And aiding and abetting a coup would make him look like an overly ambitious backstabber. His chances are probably best if he waits, builds his profile and reputation, then poses as the ABC champion when Shearer goes, earning the backing of the Shearer supporters in the process (having been loyal).

    As for sabotaging Labour, there is no need, Labour is doing quite well sabotaging itself, meaning Robertson can keep his hands clean, and wait.

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  5. beautox (422 comments) says:

    Law of unintended consequences comes biting them on the bum. And yet they still think they can run a country. Snort.

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  6. Manolo (14,044 comments) says:

    Captain Mumblefuck should be saved until the day of the election. Not a minute after it.

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  7. hmmokrightitis (1,595 comments) says:

    Manolo, totally agree. I REALLY want to see Captain Mumblefuck up against Key in leaders debates. I suspect it will be short, brutal and washing the blood out of the carpet at TVNZ will take weeks…

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  8. big bruv (14,141 comments) says:

    Gee, I wonder how Jane Clifton knows the inner workings of the Labour caucus?

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  9. BeaB (2,144 comments) says:

    I am sorry but with all the goodwill in the world there is no way you can put up a gay, podgy Wellington career politician against John Key. Or Judith Collins. Or Stephen Joyce etc etc etc.

    Lots of leadership potential in National. Tired has-beens in Labour.

    And please don’t deny us seeing twitching, weary, stumbling and mumbling Shearer up against confident, polished John Key.

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  10. Black with a Vengeance (1,865 comments) says:

    Send the cuzzies round to that suckhole Fa’afois place and make him an offer he can’t refuse!

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  11. bhudson (4,740 comments) says:

    As for Robertson doing a deal, why would he?

    Because there is only one thing worse for him than an ‘against the odds’ win by Shearer in cahoots with a coalition of the desperate – that is a successful bid by Cunliffe, with the support of the unions and members, where Robertson has been contesting. That simply reverses positions, with him on the outer and his aspirations seriously undermined.

    In the broader field of politicians, I think only someone like a former student union president who hasn’t gown beyond those dizzying heights wouldn’t be able to grasp that.

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  12. thor42 (971 comments) says:

    The election next year is crucial.
    If the Nats can get in again, that’ll give them to the end of 2017, and by then the economy should be truly rocketing along. Benefit numbers should be waaaay down by then too.

    I think there are several potential leaders in National if Key steps down.
    Collins would be great, IMO. Bennett would be too, and Stephen Joyce as well. All that a new Nat leader has to do is to confirm that they’ll stay on the same economic course. It’d be good if Key stayed, but I don’t think it’s a disaster if he doesn’t.

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  13. Bogusnews (477 comments) says:

    Interesting.

    It must be tricky. John Key, in true executive style is already putting out feelers to let the public know he is looking to step down sometime in his next term.

    So Robertson may not want to go against Key, but once key has stepped down and a replacement appointed, there may well be a honey moon period for our next Nat prime minister which could make things just as difficult.

    Unfortunately for Labour, they are suffering from a political condition called “Clarkitus.” For years, the female coterie voted people into power not on ability, but on if they were sure votes for their strange agendas which has led to a dearth of talent in their ranks.

    Chicken and roost come to mind.

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  14. greenjacket (482 comments) says:

    A serious question:
    Why does the Labour caucus hate Cunliffe so much? The biggest faction in the current caucus is ABC – Anyone But Cunliffe. Why?

    His colleagues hate Cunliffe so much, they’d rather be in opposition than have him as their leader. In Australia the Labor caucus absolutely loathed Kevin Rudd, yet even they were prepared to vote for him as leader in order to have the possibility of winning an election. So what on earth did Cunliffe do to his Labour caucus colleagues to earn such enmity?

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  15. Mark (1,489 comments) says:

    It will be interesting to see whether the voting public is ready to have an openly gay prime minister. Society has moved on a long way with gay marriage, gay adoption and openly gay MP’s more commonplace in the house. Ironically gay adoption and gay marraige put in place under a National government. It is possibly just another progression however it is going to be a brave call by Labour to put Robertson in charge.

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  16. Mark (1,489 comments) says:

    BeaB (1,666) Says:
    July 16th, 2013 at 3:45 pm
    I am sorry but with all the goodwill in the world there is no way you can put up a gay, podgy Wellington career politician against John Key. Or Judith Collins. Or Stephen Joyce etc etc etc.

    So Grant Robertson is more podgy than Judith Collins? mmm might have to think about that.

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  17. Mark (1,489 comments) says:

    thor42 (480) Says:
    July 16th, 2013 at 8:16 pm
    The election next year is crucial.
    If the Nats can get in again, that’ll give them to the end of 2017, and by then the economy should be truly rocketing along. Benefit numbers should be waaaay down by then too.

    I think there are several potential leaders in National if Key steps down.
    Collins would be great, IMO. Bennett would be too, and Stephen Joyce as well. All that a new Nat leader has to do is to confirm that they’ll stay on the same economic course. It’d be good if Key stayed, but I don’t think it’s a disaster if he doesn’t.

    Dont agree that Collins would be a good option for National. No matter how well they do can only garner very slim majorities and the choice of the next leader is going to be critical if they have any chance of remaining in charge. Key’s personal popularity is a large part of why National hold the treasury reins and Collins simply does not have it. She appeals to the right wing hard line of the party but they are not the people who decide who governs, it is the fence sitters and muddlers in the middle of the political spectrum and Key has hit the right chords with that group. Bennett would even cause Jim Bolger think about voting Labour, you simply have to be taking the piss. Joyce is the obvious option and whether he can garner the support will depend on whether he can fix Hekia’s shambles with novopay. If he can fix that he could just have the inside running as the voting public will at least see him as a problem solver.

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