Investing in Educational Success initiative moves forward

June 4th, 2014 at 2:00 pm by David Farrar

Hekia Parata announced:

Education Minister Hekia Parata has welcomed advice from sector leaders on the Government’s $359 million initiative to raise student achievement, saying it maintains momentum and strengthens the path forward.

Ms Parata has released a Working Group report that provides support and advice on the Investing in Educational Success initiative announced by the Prime Minister in January.

“Raising student achievement is one of our Government’s top priorities. This investment strongly supports that by building quality and consistency of teaching and leadership across the system,” Ms Parata says.

“Like us, parents will be very pleased we’re making such good progress on something that will make a real difference in our and classrooms.

“Unions and groups representing teachers, principals, boards of trustees, and others in the sector have worked closely with the Ministry of Education to produce a report that demonstrates very practical thinking.

“I want to acknowledge the expertise and experience Working Group members brought to the table to advance this work. I know they’re as committed as we are to raising achievement so five out of five kids succeed.”

This has been a good example of how Government can work with stakeholders. The Government announced the policy and funding, but said they’ll work with unions and others on exact details. And they have accepted some of the changes proposed by teachers and unions such as making sure teachers have both relief and inquiry time built into their week, so they can participate in the sharing of skills.

The full report is here. The key details are:

  • Communities of schools would form to encourage collaboration. Participation is voluntary.
  • There would be:
    • Community of Schools Leadership Role (for Executive Principal)
    • Community of Schools Teacher (across community) Role (for Expert Teacher)
    • Community of Schools Teacher (within school) Role (for Lead Teacher)
    • Principal Recruitment Allowance (for Change Principal Allowance).
  • Selection to the roles would be subject to meeting agreed professional standards or criteria, which are to be developed by an expert writing group
  • Release time would be provided to schools for across-community roles to fulfil their functions
  • A payment should be established to support boards of trustees of the most high need schools to broaden their recruitment pool and assist them to recruit a high quality principal. 
  • The provision of Inquiry Time would allow other teachers across a Community of Schools to access the expertise that the new roles would make available. 
  • A Teacher-led Innovation Fund (TLIF) would be established with a budget of $10 million over the coming four years. 

The has been participating, but has a general policy of disagreeing with anything National proposes, regardless of its merits. The , according to my sources, has been much more constructive, and are responsible for many of the changes proposed in the working group report. It’s a good example of the difference between constructive engagement and mindless opposition. At the end of the day the will have to decide whether they wish to campaign against thousands of their own members being able to get paid $10,000 to $50,000 a year more!

To be fair to NZEI they have been participating in the working group. They are just unable to publicly ever state that something National does could possibly be beneficial because they’re still sulking over national standards.

The PPTA response is worth quoting, and is here:

The government’s $359 million Investing in Educational Success (IES) program has been a positive example of sector collaboration, says PPTA president Angela Roberts.

Roberts welcomes today’s release of the working group report on the initiative which will see schools across the country collaborating rather than competing.

From PPTA’s point of view the consultation over IES was comprehensive, robust and genuine, Roberts said.

“We stepped up to the challenge and engaged as fully as it is possible to do.”

The sector had worked hard together to find pragmatic answers and there had been significant movement from the originally unacceptable cabinet paper, Roberts said.

“You know it’s collaboration when it’s hard work – and this was really hard work.”

“We feel cabinet has heard us,” she said.

In stark contrast to the NZEI position. If I was a primary teacher I’d be asking my union why they are constantly badmouthing a plan to allow the best teachers and principals to earn up to $50,000 a year more.

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19 Responses to “Investing in Educational Success initiative moves forward”

  1. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    But, but, the PPTA is pure evil, only interested in their members’ jobs. I know, coz I’ve read so a lot on Kiwiblog.

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  2. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Breaking education news: Trevor Mallard has accused Hekia Parata of striking a staff member.

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  3. igm (1,413 comments) says:

    If Hekia has whacked someone, it is a pity it is not mikenwimp.

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  4. ross411 (842 comments) says:

    mikenmild (9,745 comments) says:
    June 4th, 2014 at 2:03 pm
    But, but, the PPTA is pure evil, only interested in their members’ jobs. I know, coz I’ve read so a lot on Kiwiblog.

    It’s okay. You’re here on a place of moderately rational discussion, where censoring of alternate views does not happen. You don’t need to compensate for bottling up whatever you might have to say, as you have to on the pro-Labour discussion web sites. You can relax and base what you say on the evidence at hand, rather than struggling to portray things in a way that somehow someway favours you getting your way.

    Yes, I also read the news articles David links to on mainstream media sites. They do reflect badly on the PPTA, in a way that indicates a desire to prevent change, or people being held responsible for their actions. It is a big time saver not to have to find these articles myself, and I too, like you appreciate being able to come here to be made aware of these things, therefore saving time.

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  5. igm (1,413 comments) says:

    If Hekia did hit someone, it would not be a known cardiac patient, such as Mallard picks. The guy is a gutless piece of s..t and he has shown, once again, why he is a loser!

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  6. jakejakejake (134 comments) says:

    I’m sure if Hekia assaulted a staff member there was a good reason for it.

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  7. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    So bad if Mallard assaults someone but good if Parata does?

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  8. jakejakejake (134 comments) says:

    There is a huge difference between Mallard violently attacking an ethnic minority MP and Hekia giving a staff member an almost motherly tap on the head for misbehaving.

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  9. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    ‘an almost motherly tap’
    Is that what she’s calling it? I thought she denied it altogether.

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  10. RightNow (6,994 comments) says:

    Deary me mikenmallard you’re really struggling to derail the thread aren’t you. Heaven forbid you do some work during the time we pay you. Clearly there’s still plenty left to cut from the public service. Looking forward to national really taking an axe to the lazy deadwood like yourself in their third term

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  11. Keeping Stock (10,342 comments) says:

    Trevor Mallard must have got sick of looking for the elusive “American bagman” who was supposedly collecting donations to John Key in 2008. If he has evidence of an assault having taken place, you’d think that as a Member of Parliament he has an even greater duty to put up; or shut up.

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  12. Nigel Kearney (1,019 comments) says:

    Union leaders want as many members in the union as possible because it gives them more power. The way to achieve that is not higher salaries. It is to have the available budget spread very thinly, i.e. lots of teachers on low salaries with small class sizes. That’s not what teachers want but it’s obviously hard for them to organize themselves sufficiently to overcome the agenda of the people running their own union.

    It’s smart of National to be concluding this shortly before the election. The unions may hate it but a strike would be unpopular and hurt the Labour party. When Labour is in power, they can threaten strikes with impunity every election year because they know Labour cannot afford that and will have to cave in.

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  13. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Back on topic (sorry RN), looks like being a positive initiative. Shows what might be achieved if you work with the teachers’ representatives.

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  14. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    ‘That’s not what teachers want but it’s obviously hard for them to organize themselves sufficiently to overcome the agenda of the people running their own union.’
    Who do you think is running the union if it’s not the teachers themselves?

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  15. Keeping Stock (10,342 comments) says:

    @ mikenmild – it’s also an example to one teacher union of what another is able to achieve for its members when it works collaboratively, constructively and in good faith with a government it opposes on most issues. NZEI is really letting its myopia get in the way of the career path and aspirations of its members.

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  16. Rightandleft (663 comments) says:

    Nigel,

    Did you read the full article? It says the PPTA, a teachers union, was strongly supportive of this government policy and was working hard to increase its teachers pay. And that is the union which is actually run by teachers. It’s entire executive is made up of practising full time teachers who don’t get one cent for their extra service to the union. The NZEI on the other hand is mostly controlled by principals. This should be further proof that not all unions are alike, nor are they all corrupt, evil Labour Party allies. There are in fact unions that stand up for their members best interests and counter the power of the employer in a way that actually benefits all involved. A happy work force is more productive after all. So don’t tar all unions with the same brush. There are dirty unions and dirty corporations but they’re the minority.

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  17. timmydevo (53 comments) says:

    Yet to see how releasing teachers to go and advise other teachers will be able to maintain their own high standards of classroom work (in the case of an expert teacher, they have provision for up to 40% release.) There seems to be a lot of out of classroom work… is this the best place for a teacher? Shouldn’t they be IN their own classroom, making the difference there? I think you’d find that many teachers who would be deemed to be “expert” or “lead” would be truly torn in “making a difference” outside their class (and getting some extra in the paycheck) or making a difference to the students directly under their supervision.

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  18. doggone7 (808 comments) says:

    If a principal is employed by a school to do 100% of the principal’s job should a board then let them go somewhere else to be the principal helping other schools? If the job in their own school is such a sinecure should they take a cut in pay rather than get money for being a 140% principal?

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  19. Colville (2,272 comments) says:

    $50,000 is a lot of tin for a teacher, it must be 50% of salary. They will do a lot to get $50K.

    Smart politics AND well aimed spending!

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