Execution for throwing a stone

March 18th, 2010 at 5:28 am by David Farrar

The Herald reports:

A student who was arrested for throwing a stone during pro-democracy demonstrations is to be executed, said yesterday.

Mohammad-Amin Valian, a 20-year-old Islamic studies student, was arrested on the basis of a photograph taken at a mass demonstration against the rigged presidential election last year.

He was among six convicted of moharebeh, or waging war against God.

I guess waging war against God sounds a better charge than waging war against election fraud.

Whenever the United States executes a prisoner who has been found guilty of one or more brutal murders, there are massive protests ranging from the local, to global. Even the Pope sometimes weighs in.

I hope an equal amount of energy will be spent protesting the death of this 20 year old Iranian, for throwing a stone.

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29 Responses to “Execution for throwing a stone”

  1. Chthoniid (1,966 comments) says:

    I would hope so also, but I suspect part of the reason the US gets massive protests is because, well, it’s not an entirely futile gesture & can influence policy.

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  2. Brian Smaller (3,915 comments) says:

    Compared to the way teh US is protested against by all and sundry, I suspect that the execution of an Iranian student will be a big yawn to most. Islamic countries executing people seem to get a free pass. Even when they are killing young people for being gay, let alone protesting againt the government.

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  3. MikeNZ (3,234 comments) says:

    Well I am sure that bastion of freedom and democracy the UN will call a special meeting to castigate the country and the UN Human Rights Council will stop all proceedings to issue a declaratory statement that the state has continued to abuse and trample basic Human rights and what they are doing is a state endorsed program.

    That country will of copurse be – Israel yet again.

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  4. Graeme Edgeler (3,216 comments) says:

    Whenever the United States executes a prisoner who has been found guilty of one or more brutal murders, there are massive protests ranging from the local, to global. Even the Pope sometimes weighs in.

    There were 52 executions in the United States last year. Were there really massive protests ranging from the local, to global for all of them?

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  5. Fisiani (852 comments) says:

    Didnt they have a vote about this.
    All those in Favour Raise your right hand.
    All those against raise the stump.

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  6. kowtow (6,690 comments) says:

    Any ploughshare “activists” up to a higher lawful purpose breakin at the Iranian embassy,I dont think so.

    Last month Cuban dissident Orlando Zapata Tamayo died on hunger strike in one of Castros prisons,any big noise, sorry reserved for Gitmo.

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  7. dime (8,751 comments) says:

    hmm thats strange. luc is usually the first to comment on anything in this part of the world.

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  8. LeftRightOut (622 comments) says:

    And when, Mr Farrar, will we see YOU protesting about the Palestinian kids executed for throwing stones? And they don’t even get the benefit of a trial.

    Regime change for Israel, anyone?

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  9. dime (8,751 comments) says:

    BAHAHAHA LRO, at least condemn Iran for their action before resorting to your anti-israeli bullshit.

    Thread jacker! should be demerits.

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  10. emmess (1,333 comments) says:

    LeftRightOut, do you even know what an execution is?

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  11. kowtow (6,690 comments) says:

    Palestinians execute “colaborators”,large no of onlookers with mobile phone cameras covering the “action”. Who cares? Sorry I forgot ,its OK for them to do it as its a “liberation struggle”.

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  12. MikeNZ (3,234 comments) says:

    Iran will continue to do what it likes including killing stone throwers because they have backing by others as well as the OIC in the UN.
    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2010/mar/17/irans-link-to-china-includes-nukes-missiles/

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  13. MikeNZ (3,234 comments) says:

    Iran will continue to do what she wants as long as she has support in the background even if that means a state sponsored program of rape and abuse of the young democrats. So whats one execution amongst all the killings?
    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2010/mar/17/irans-link-to-china-includes-nukes-missiles/

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  14. MikeNZ (3,234 comments) says:

    oops sorry it didn’t come up as a post so thought it hadn’t happened.

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  15. Scott (1,614 comments) says:

    Good on you for bringing this to our attention David. I think the huge protests in Iran against the incredibly hard line Muslim government should have been big news. It would have been nice to have seen Obama give a strong statement in support of the protesters as well. And now that they are starting to execute people simply for protesting, once again the government of Barack Obama is conspicuously silent.

    I would like to see the government of Iran fall. There is clearly frustration in the streets, particularly among young people, against the brutal and repressive regime. I also support the church in Iran, which is persecuted round-the-clock. God willing they will one day shake off the repression that is Islam.

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  16. RRM (8,988 comments) says:

    [DPF]: “Whenever the United States executes a prisoner who has been found guilty of one or more brutal murders, there are massive protests ranging from the local, to global. Even the Pope sometimes weighs in.”

    The Pope sees himself as the spiritual leader of the majority religious faith of which major nation?

    (a) Iran

    (b) The United States of America

    (c) I don’t know

    (d) Boo evil lefties; they all love Al-Qaeda, hate their own western culture, and want the Taleban to enslave us all in Sharia law. What? No, I stopped taking the pills months ago. I feel fine….

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  17. backster (2,000 comments) says:

    I wonder what Keith Locke will have to say about this. Will Amnesty International cease condemning nations like NZ long enough to express their displeasure. Maybe when the United Nations has finished with Minister Power they might like to conduct an enquiry into this situation.

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  18. Luc Hansen (4,573 comments) says:

    Talking about Minister of Foreign Affairs Justice Power (he of “where the US goes, we go” fame), he is reported as saying prior to his testimony to the UN, that “in spite of the recession, New Zealand’s record on human rights is (pretty good).”

    WTF?

    So now human rights are dependent on economics? I’d love to hear how that is. Since Iran’s per capita income is pretty low, about 1/3rd of ours, maybe, by Simon Powers’ standards they have got their human rights observance about right?

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  19. big bruv (12,348 comments) says:

    Why the hell is Power even in New York answering questions from the corrupt UN?

    I hear they have been asking Power questions like “why are Maori over represented in our prison population”?

    Now of course Power will give some bullshit answer when in reality he should have replied “because they commit the crimes”.

    Fuck the UN, there is no way on earth we should ever subject ourselves to scrutiny from that bunch of corrupt socialist bastards.

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  20. JiveKitty (869 comments) says:

    Majority religious faith of USA is Christian if that’s what you’re referring to. The Pope sees himself as the spiritual leader of all Catholics, not Christians. (Catholicism is a subset of Christianity.)

    This piece of news doesn’t surprise me. A corrupt government, supported by corrupt religious leaders following a religion more stone-age than most in its interpretation, decides to execute someone who opposes them using a piece of religious law.

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  21. unaha-closp (1,033 comments) says:

    The Iranians executed an orphan because she was getting molested by a 51 yo. man (she was 13). She was executed (after a trial and the exhaustion of all appeals) at age 16. The BBC made a doco about it.

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  22. JiveKitty (869 comments) says:

    Not surprised at that either. In what is a general consensus among the Hadiths, Mohammed married Aisha when she was aged 6 and consummated when she was aged 9. Male on female pedophilia and rape’s got a bit of a long history of establishment support in Islam if you look at it that way.

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  23. Kris K (3,570 comments) says:

    JiveKitty 2:55 pm,

    Majority religious faith of USA is Christian if that’s what you’re referring to. The Pope sees himself as the spiritual leader of all Catholics, not Christians. (Catholicism is a subset of Christianity.)

    And others might say that, in fact, Roman Catholicism is the world’s largest Christian cult, and is not a part of Christianity at all.

    But back to Islam:

    He was among six convicted of moharebeh, or waging war against God [Allah].

    Another thing that will get you executed is denigrading Mohammed, Allah’s prophet, or for that matter, converting out of Islam to another faith (but especially Christianity).

    But, then, this is Islam – the religion of peace and tolerance; and we welcome them here and allow them to build their mosques – how dumb are we?

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  24. JiveKitty (869 comments) says:

    Kris K: “And others might say that, in fact, Roman Catholicism is the world’s largest Christian cult, and is not a part of Christianity at all.”

    I know others might say that, but the general view is that it is a part of Christianity. I don’t see how one can divorce Catholicism from Christianity, particularly when you suggest it’s a “Christian cult”, although they do have some divergent beliefs from what is now mainstream Christianity – the emphasis on Mary, for example.

    By the distinctions made between Church, Sect and Cult, Catholicism is not a cult in the technical sense of the word as used in religious studies or even psychology and sociology, I’m pretty sure. Stark and Bainbridge did the seminal religious studies interpretation with “A Theory of Religion”, I think. In further studies, the interpretation’s been similar as far as I can recall. I’ve qualified these statements because it’s been a few years since I’ve read Stark and Bainbridge.

    “But, then, this is Islam – the religion of peace and tolerance; and we welcome them here and allow them to build their mosques – how dumb are we?”

    Thing is, I don’t have a problem welcoming them, because we can show a better way to those who could do with some knowledge of tolerance and peace, but they’d best be prepared to abide by our laws when they come and if not, they can leave. I’m fine with the building of mosques – freedom of religious affiliation and belief and all that – but if they want funding to do it, or to force others who don’t wish to accomodate their beliefs, again, they can leave. (There’s a difference between toleration and accomodation. Accomodation where it doesn’t put others out is fine: ie, if somebody wants to pray to Mecca during the day, that should be fine, provided they are not paid for that time or it is built into their pay scale). But then, I don’t think government should be funding or forcing others to accomodate for any religious beliefs, be they Christian, from Maori culture or whatever, so this is not an inconsistent view or one that picks out Islam particularly.

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  25. Kris K (3,570 comments) says:

    JiveKitty 5:24 pm

    I know others might say that, but the general view is that it is a part of Christianity. I don’t see how one can divorce Catholicism from Christianity, particularly when you suggest it’s a “Christian cult”, although they do have some divergent beliefs from what is now mainstream Christianity – the emphasis on Mary, for example.

    I understand that that’s the ‘general view’, but I guess for me anything that identifies itself as Christian, but adds to the completed works of Christ, is a (Christian) cult. You can add to your list infant baptism for salvation (versus believer’s baptism as first act of obedience), and the Pope as ‘God on earth’ and his ability to supersede scripture as perhaps just another two things that, I believe, distinguishes RC ‘doctrine’ from biblical doctrine.

    Thing is, I don’t have a problem welcoming them, because we can show a better way to those who could do with some knowledge of tolerance and peace, but they’d best be prepared to abide by our laws when they come and if not, they can leave. I’m fine with the building of mosques …

    The thing is that adherents to Islam that take the Koran and Hadith seriously place Sharia law above the laws of any host (non Islamic) nation. In Islamic nations there is no differentiation between the ‘laws of the land’ and Sharia law – they are one and the same.

    As an example, we have just, in the last few days, been discussing Islamic marriages between underage girls (under sixteen) and older men right here in New Zealand. So which laws are they holding to – NZ law or Sharia law? Clearly Sharia, where they can marry as young as 6 yo and certainly 9 yo – the age Mohammed consumated his marriage to Aisha.

    I believe this is just one example, among many, of how much respect some Muslims regards the laws of their host nation. One only needs to consider the UK where the Muslim immigrants are wanting to set up Sharia courts separate to the UK justice system. Given time, and enough immigration, we in New Zealand will likely go down this same road.
    I believe we must resist now, before it’s too late.

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  26. Pete George (21,804 comments) says:

    Kris, it’s interesting that you bring up “Catholicism is the world’s largest Christian cult, and is not a part of Christianity at all.”

    Do you think you are a Christ-type Christian, or more of a Crusader?

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  27. radar (319 comments) says:

    “Whenever the United States executes a prisoner who has been found guilty of one or more brutal murders, there are massive protests ranging from the local, to global.”

    It could have something to do with the fact – and it always seems to happen more when a Republican is in the White House – that the United States is always telling everyone it is the greatest force for good in the world. It’s leaders are always preaching morality and human rights while violating them themselves. Meanwhile, we expect the government of Iran to violate human rights so when they do it we aren’t surprised. The US is the only civilised democracy to still have capital punishment. The state of Utah still has execution by firing squad on the books. Says a lot about a place.

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  28. expat (4,048 comments) says:

    Utah – Lafayette Ronald Hubbard’s spiritual heartland.

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  29. JiveKitty (869 comments) says:

    @radar: I mainly thought it was because in the USA, public perception and opinion, despite whatever people believe about entrenched power structures, can still have an influence, maybe not as far as some would like, but it still does, and sometimes decisions are changed. Whereas the Iranian government will probably just pull out how they’re being persecuted and have the right to self-govern and express their governmental power however they want. And if one did happen to go and protest there, you’d probably suffer some severe consequences for little gain. This is in spite of claims that the Iranian government and certain apologists might make about Iran and Islam being just dandy.

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