Fibre on poles

May 5th, 2014 at 4:00 pm by David Farrar

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A reader e-mails:

Here are some photos of the double telephone poles in Oamaru. I notice now that the fiber does not seem to be strung from pole to pole, but rather is undergrounded and goes back up each pole where it is terminated in some sort of junction box – see photos for details.

It seems the copper wires will be brought over to the new fiber pole and the old copper strung pole will be removed at some stage. This seems to have happened to some other double poles that until recently were like this down another nearby road. I am guessing the reason for replacing the old telephone poles is that they are quite old anyway. You can see they are gum tree trunks and no one has used gum tree telephone poles since the 1970s I think.

So now each street has a set of poles for electricity, copper and . Wouldn’t it be nice if they could all share? Good to see the roll-out happening though.

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14 Responses to “Fibre on poles”

  1. gump (1,662 comments) says:

    @dpf

    “Wouldn’t it be nice if they could all share?”

    —————————–

    The poles are private property that are owned and managed by competing companies.

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  2. Rex Widerstrom (5,354 comments) says:

    What, no fibre to the home?! That seems incredibly shortsighted… a bit like the Liberal Party’s watered-down National Broadband scheme in Australia. About the only thing the ALP did right was commit to FTTH but now only a handful of residences have it or are ever likely to (mine included, thankfully).

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  3. Adolf Fiinkensein (2,922 comments) says:

    Rex, the fifty billion dollar bloody white elephant will be obsolete before it’s finished.

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  4. MikeG (425 comments) says:

    It’s the sign of the brighter future that we were promised

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  5. GreenParrot (2 comments) says:

    It looks like the old pole is being replaced with a new one; can’t see what your problem is! The old one will be taken away after all the lines are transferred to the new one.

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  6. RRM (10,026 comments) says:

    A sure sign of how stupid the so-called “professionals” are.

    Me & my mates could have designed a much better system in 5 minutes down at the Empire Hotel.

    :-)

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  7. James Stephenson (2,228 comments) says:

    It is fibre to the home, Rex. If you currently get your copper connection overhead, that’s how the fibre will get to your home too.

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  8. RF (1,454 comments) says:

    What a bloody Dads Army approach. Second hand goods.

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  9. billr (21 comments) says:

    what makes you think that’s a fibre connection? take a photo in a few days time and lets see where the old lines go. it looks like a common pole/dp replacement to me.

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  10. peterwn (3,309 comments) says:

    It is surprising such old NZPO outside plant has survived. Earlier on a cable network would have served a relatively small number of 25 pair cable boxes to which the overhead lines were connected. Then there was 15 pair boxes serving 12 sections or so, then they were infilled with more boxes so in most cases no telephone lines ran along the road. This was called ‘UDOS’ underground distribution overhead service. Even in UK where virtually all urban power distribution is underground, UDOS telephone reticulation is common with one pole serving 8 or so houses.

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  11. anonymouse (722 comments) says:

    +1 on greenparrot’s post, tose existing wooden pole look like they are seriously “end of life” so they will shift the cross arm the power network uses to the new pole, and remove the old one,
    The photo submittor should just have a bit of patience before claiming that the end of the world is coming and dogs and cats are looking amorously at each other

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  12. cha (4,081 comments) says:

    That ain’t no pole mounted fibre termination.

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  13. PaulP (156 comments) says:

    Power lines on both sides of the street too, what an eyesore

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  14. pejhay (29 comments) says:

    Not exactly sure what the pictured (old) pole is doing…

    Lower left wire does not seem to connect to anything, upper one passes through.

    The old pole is clearly end of life, and maybe the photographer would prefer it through his roof in the next gale…

    Doubt this is a fibre run out, but maybe a cable one. In Wellington, where services were already aerial, the cable was added to the existing poles, where underground, it went underground. This was primarily terrain related, but also, they’d avoid hard ground/rock if going underground.

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