Privileged treatment

July 4th, 2014 at 3:00 pm by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

The Maori King’s son has succeeded in his bid to avoid drink-driving and theft convictions after his lawyer argued it was likely to bar his succession to the throne.

, 19, appeared in the Auckland District Court this afternoon charged with drink driving, two counts of burglary and one of theft.

Judge Philippa Cunningham discharged Paki without conviction on all charges but imposed a special condition that he provide the court evidence he did not have an alcohol problem or if he did, that he had addressed it with counselling. …

The burglaries and theft happened in March while he was on bail and the judge noted it had also occurred after a night of drinking.

So he was already on bail, and kept on offending.

The trio was ordered to each pay prosecution costs of $400 and were discharged without conviction.

Paki also applied for a discharge without conviction today.

His lawyer Paul Wicks QC told the court a conviction would impede his ability to accede to the throne.

Potential successors had to have an unblemished record because of the custodial responsibilities involved as King.

“The chiefs around the country are often heard to say [heirs to the throne] have to be ‘whiter than the dove’,” Wicks said.

Well he isn’t, regardless of the discharge.

I don’t care that he is the son of the Maori King. If he was the son of the English King, and got off on the same basis, I’d be equally disapproving.

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74 Responses to “Privileged treatment”

  1. big bruv (14,132 comments) says:

    LOl, just cut and paste the first half of todays General Debate into this thread and she is all on.

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  2. Jack5 (5,145 comments) says:

    Damn, I thought we could have a fair and balanced debate without the idiot big bruv (3.04).

    But here’s a link to comment by Dover Samuel and an Auckland academic who specialises in the relationship between Maori culture and traditions and NZ law

    http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/248920/samuels-criticises-ruling-on-king's-son

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  3. kowtow (8,733 comments) says:

    The authorities who are charged with appointing the king will know this character has had “issues” with the courts.

    How then does a non conviction make him a suitable candidate?

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  4. Jack5 (5,145 comments) says:

    The new Godwin’s law (or Godwin’s Rule of Nazi Analogies) –

    As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of invoking an allegation of racism approaches 1.

    The front starter for reaching this point in this thread today is big bruv, known to Dad 4 Justice as Big Blouse.

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  5. mikemikemikemike (331 comments) says:

    Tell me why this is news over and above the xx number of people who have been discharged without conviction?

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  6. Nigel Kearney (1,047 comments) says:

    Godwin’s law exists because any comparison to the Nazis is almost certainly going to be a gross exaggeration. Allegations of racism, however, will often be accurate and certainly seem justified given the behaviour of the Judge Philippa Cunningham in this case. Since she was last in the news for letting a child abuser escape conviction, mere racism may actually be a step in the right direction for her.

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  7. big bruv (14,132 comments) says:

    “Damn, I thought we could have a fair and balanced debate without the idiot big bruv”

    You mean rant and rave whilst pretending to advocate for one law for all?

    No Jack5, what you want is a thread where you can bash the hell out of Maori and pretend that they get special treatment in the eyes of the law.

    The difference is Jack5 is that I really DO want one law for all. No special treatment for Maori and no worse treatment for Maori, no special treatment for non Maori and no worse treatment for non Maori.

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  8. Redbaiter (9,503 comments) says:

    I like Dover Samuel’s “cultural hypnosis” phrase.

    An excellent description of the crippled mindset of most progs who think the place for white Europeans is at the bottom of any contemporary social/ political paradigm.

    Its the kind of thinking that keeps the unlawful communist Barack Obama President of the US when if he had been white he would have been impeached a number of times by now.

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  9. Jack5 (5,145 comments) says:

    Big Blouse at 3.28:

    So you think the Maori King’s son should have got off without a conviction? Yes or no?

    You want equal justice for all? How about for Catholics?

    I’m not a Catholic, but I’m appalled at your bigotry against Catholics in the general thread, and your blatant lie about the proportion of Catholics in ????? (unmentionable without letting the troll Big Blouse stuff up two threads by Godwin’s Law).

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  10. mikenmild (11,662 comments) says:

    ‘Its the kind of thinking that keeps the unlawful communist Barack Obama President of the US’
    Isn’t there some sort of corollary to Godwin’s Law that means that whoever introduces irrelevant birther arguments automatically loses the debate?

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  11. Weihana (4,583 comments) says:

    If he was the son of the English King…

    Haven’t been many of those for some time… Not since James II at least.

    I don’t care that he is the son of the Maori King.

    Neither does he looks like… unless of course that Yankees cap is a proud expression of his heritage. :)

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  12. Redbaiter (9,503 comments) says:

    I’m saying that a judge making such racially partisan decisions is symptomatic of the same cultural hypnosis that allows Barack Obama to get away with so many actions as President that any white President would not. Actions such as Executive Orders that the Supreme court has already struck down as illegal.

    Another contributing factor in this lack of criticism is of course that many fear the backlash of Progressives who protect their false morality with hate and venom and viciousness.

    But you don’t frighten me Milky. I will speak the truth and you can GGF.

    Maori separatists, and black communists like Obama, need to be called out for exactly what they are.

    (BTW, why are you bringing Obama’s claim that he was born in Kenya into this?)

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  13. Nukuleka (346 comments) says:

    I do wonder at times about all the petty point scoring that goes on between various bloggers here. The issue seems pretty clear to me. The basis of the Judge’s decision appears to be that a conviction would interfere with his prospects of acceding to the throne when his turn comes. That is a suspect decision in that it implies preferential treatment. The judgement is an ass and will be seen as such by most NZers irrespective of colour, creed or culture.

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  14. mikenmild (11,662 comments) says:

    LOL Reddy, take your birther nonsense to GD, eh?

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  15. flipper (4,196 comments) says:

    The test of an apolitical Crown Law Office will be whether the Crown lodges an appeal. The aggravating factor is that the offending occurred while he was on bail. Unforgiveable.

    The Judge will have had the C of A sentencing guidelines before her. I doubt if they allow for a bullshit “king” and his family. The fact that this fellow is an ordinary New Zealander, will always be so, and deserves what any other individual would receive in similar circumstances.

    Nothing more, nothing less.

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  16. burt (8,309 comments) says:

    Dirty old Dover – tell us how it’s wrong that people aren’t charged for breaking the law…. If it wasn’t so sad it would be funny.

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  17. Weihana (4,583 comments) says:

    Redbaiter,

    black communists like Obama

    Are black communists a scarier version of white communists? :)

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  18. flipper (4,196 comments) says:

    “The fact that this fellow is an ordinary New Zealander, will always be so, and deserves what any other individual would receive in similar circumstances. “

    The stupid system would not allow me to edit.
    The correct version should be:

    “The fact is that this fellow is an ordinary New Zealander, will always be so, and deserves what any other individual would receive in similar circumstances. “

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  19. projectman (227 comments) says:

    There are numerous examples of young people being discharged without conviction because of a potential impact on their careers. It used to happen regularly with law students (and maybe still does).

    The question for me is why did the judge use the rationale of a potential impact on his future as Maori king when he is the second son and therefore presumably not the first to be up for this sinecure.

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  20. Weihana (4,583 comments) says:

    The fact is that this fellow is an ordinary New Zealander

    Is this not a slight on ordinary New Zealanders?

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  21. gump (1,661 comments) says:

    Sounds like a bad case of second son syndrome.

    Prince Harry has the same affliction.

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  22. Longknives (4,858 comments) says:

    Just check out the smirk on this guy leaving the Court…

    http://m.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11287123

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  23. Unity (609 comments) says:

    Surely the fact that the crime was committed while he was out on bail should mean he would be dealt with properly and without special treatment/privilege/leniency. He had offended twice for goodness sake. It wasn’t a first offence so he obviously hadn’t learned from the first crime. Who’s to say he wouldn’t do it again if he had already offended twice?

    Anyway, isn’t the position of a Maori King just a fallacy? My understanding is that it is not accepted by most people of Maori descent. We are all supposed to be under the one monarch. You can’t be under two.

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  24. big bruv (14,132 comments) says:

    Jack5

    “So you think the Maori King’s son should have got off without a conviction? Yes or no?”

    I do realise you are a stupid person Jack so it may pay for you to read the following a few times before it sinks in.

    It is my opinion that the Maori Kings son should not have escaped conviction. However, it is also my opinion that given this young mans future he deserves to be cut the same kind of slack we repeatedly cut the sons of other prominent Kiwis, or sportsmen.

    Do I think this is right?….hell no, but at least this is one case of the law being colour blind, this is an example of one law for all.

    What you and so many others want is for this kid to be treated differently simply because he is brown, or (and in my opinion a far more sinister reason) because he is the son of the Maori King.

    Does this mean I support the Maori monarchy?…hell no.
    Does this mean I am soft on crime?….hell no.
    Does this mean that I am an apologist for the high crime rate among Maori?…hell no.
    Does this mean I am a huge fan of one law for all?…..hell YES.

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  25. Weihana (4,583 comments) says:

    Can’t recall Harry committing burglary, theft and drink driving.

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  26. thedavincimode (6,869 comments) says:

    But you don’t frighten me Milky. I will speak the truth and you can GGF.

    Thank you for having the courage to speak out. Our country needed someone to do that – a born leader – a catalyst – and it was you. Will the rest of us have the courage to rally to your flag? Only time will tell.

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  27. Scott Chris (6,176 comments) says:

    Are black communists a scarier version of white communists?

    Not to mention red communists or, God forbid, green ones. :)

    /wave

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  28. anticorruptionnz (215 comments) says:

    Its actually comforting to know that he appeared before the court go to https://www.fyi.org.nz/request/details_of_the_offer_made_by_ter#incoming-3859 this refers to a rich business man who had 22 fraud charges dropped by crown law.

    he had been a fugitive from our laws for 5 years his co offender was convicted and sentenced and he gets off Scott free.

    we are not all equal

    But if he is supporting a perceived stereotype he has certainly achieved that- lead by example

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  29. Weihana (4,583 comments) says:

    However, it is also my opinion that given this young mans future he deserves to be cut the same kind of slack we repeatedly cut the sons of other prominent Kiwis, or sportsmen.

    Surely it’s somewhat ridiculous that the conviction, or lack of, would decide whether this boy became “King”. And if the decision were to rest on that fact alone then it simply makes the whole movement ridiculous.

    We can overlook the burglary, theft and drink driving… but that piece of paper that says you have a conviction? Nah…

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  30. Colinxy (25 comments) says:

    Is there a way of easily finding out a judge’s history of court decisions? Philippa Cunningham has precedence for this: the comedian defense. If you make people laugh you can get off child molestation. It would be interesting to know how much she hugs criminals.

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  31. big bruv (14,132 comments) says:

    Weihana

    I do hope you get what I am saying here. I do not disagree with you at all, the problem is not with this young man it is with the law as it is currently enforced.

    I am sick of hearing people bleat and moan about “one law for all” without actually knowing what the fuck they are talking about. When we see a real case of people (albeit this one instance) witnessing one law for all in action they don’t like it. What they are really saying is that they don’t like the idea of a brown kid being treated the same as a white kid.

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  32. MT_Tinman (3,250 comments) says:

    Big Bruv, your argument will be correct if you can show one occasion where others have got off two separate offences simply because of who they (or their parents) are.

    I agree NZ must return to a one law for all state.

    As an aside I’m told this judge has previous form for stupid decisions. Is she a political appointment from the last government?

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  33. kowtow (8,733 comments) says:

    “Can’t recall Harry committing burglary, theft and drink driving.”

    Worse. He dressed as a Nazi for a fancy dress party.

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  34. Mike (491 comments) says:

    Imagine getting beat and and robbed by a prince! Lol

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  35. Manolo (14,030 comments) says:

    To top it off the Stone Age “prince” is about to become a father. God help NZ!

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  36. anticorruptionnz (215 comments) says:

    He of all people should be aware of the example he is setting.
    it is consequences which are a deterrent.
    it appears that for him there are no consequences

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  37. Fentex (1,015 comments) says:

    There’s nothing unusual about such treatment – there are people privileged over others in our society by our courts.

    I first learned this when a student at university with me was let off a charge of assault and theft because he was studying law and a conviction would have barred him from many options of employment as a lawyer.

    Thus I witnessed a convention intended to protect foolish youths from unreasonable consequences of ill thought acts defeat regulations designed to protect society from the predilections of criminal practitioners of law.

    In practice society was not protected from a lawyer with shaky morals, the student with demonstrable criminal ethics was protected from the consequences of breaking the law.

    Acceptable to our social elites because they see people like themselves getting considerations they would like given to themselves and thus we live with laws for those who dress, talk, look like and are related to the right people and laws for everyone else.

    This case, like many others demonstrates that there is no one law for all in NZ.

    And while that annoys me it doesn’t drive me to think there should be no discretion for judges because discretion is required for justice to be able to be fair, nuanced and compassionate. Just that discretion shouldn’t be perverted to shield those with privileges from consequences.

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  38. rightoverlabour (114 comments) says:

    The guy is a criminal. conviction or not. The bigger issue is why do we keep this joke of a concept of a Maori King? We have one head of State. Anyone else is an impostor.

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  39. Jack5 (5,145 comments) says:

    Big Blouse posted at 4.22:

    What you and so many others want is for this kid to be treated differently simply because he is brown, or (and in my opinion a far more sinister reason) because he is the son of the Maori King.

    Evidence please? Which post? When? The poster? The precise words you base this on please.

    As it stands you have merely extended posters’ arguments then attacked the extensions. That’s con stuff. Are you just having a joke with everybody?

    Why in the general thread did you answer Dover Samuels only with an ad hominem attack on him? Why did you ignore Khylee Quince’s view on the conviction being no block to the lad becoming king (I linked to the report of these in the 3.07 post above)?

    Big Blouse, you have a nerve to pose as a champion of justice after your prejudiced smear on Catholics in the general thread was exposed as a lie. I’m not a Catholic, but I found that disgusting.

    Big Blouse at 4.22:

    I am a huge fan of one law for all?…..hell YES.

    Except for Catholics, eh, Big Blouse?

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  40. Mark (1,489 comments) says:

    This decision simply makes a mockery of the judicial system in this country and should be open to direct criticism. The clear inference that this Judge has made is that we are not all equal before the law.

    Why was the clean slate legislation not used here? If this young man is convicted today but then keeps his nose clean for 7 years isn’t the conviction expunged from his record.

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  41. Griff (8,159 comments) says:

    I applaud Big bruvs stance on this issue.
    Justice should be blind .
    Being a privileged student studying law, a Maori pseudo prince, a sports star or a comedian should not matter when it comes to justice.
    The fact that the rich often manage to escape the impact of their crimes by paying high end lawyers is also a failure of our justice system.

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  42. Hair Removal Specialist (80 comments) says:

    Why is everyone hating on this wannabe gangsta. Don’t you know that it’s cool to act like a tough guy and then when you get caught act like a snivelling little weasel. Gotta laugh at the photo of him, sitting next to the truck driver, with his red NY baseball cap on. What an awesome dude, but forgot to take the sticker off his hat before he wore it.

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  43. Hair Removal Specialist (80 comments) says:

    Griff, agree that justice should be blind but I have never heard of a law student being let off just for being a law student. Most cases I have heard of are sports people complaining about overseas travel. They should just have to suck it up IMHO.

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  44. dirty harry (513 comments) says:

    So, so wrong. The peasants must revolt on this one. What happens if the dirtbag commits murder? He’s above the law because he is a ” future king” ? LMFAO.

    A sad day for justice ( or lack of ) in apartheid New Zealand.

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  45. F E Smith (3,307 comments) says:

    Weihana,

    If he was the son of the English King…

    Haven’t been many of those for some time… Not since James II at least.

    Technically that would have to be William II of Scotland and III of England, who, although Dutch, was King of England.  If you mean a King who was English then yes, James II, although he was the son of a Scottish father and a French mother…

    Mark,

    Why was the clean slate legislation not used here? If this young man is convicted today but then keeps his nose clean for 7 years isn’t the conviction expunged from his record.

    No, it isn’t.  Any convictions stay there, but the person does not have to admit to them except in some circumstances (like being back in Court).  In effect, it is simply a licence to lie about your past.

    Everybody,

    The guidance for the Court in whether to grant an application under s106 (which is a Discharge without Conviction) is in s107 of the Sentencing Act

    The court must not discharge an offender without conviction unless the court is satisfied that the direct and indirect consequences of a conviction would be out of all proportion to the gravity of the offence.

    There is a lot more in the case law, but it is a good place to start.

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  46. F E Smith (3,307 comments) says:

    The fact that the rich often manage to escape the impact of their crimes by paying high end lawyers is also a failure of our justice system.

    I have done s106 applications for poor people, too, and successfully so.  It isn’t a matter of how much money you have.

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  47. Mike (491 comments) says:

    F E Smith! Please post more

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  48. Longknives (4,858 comments) says:

    “So, so wrong. The peasants must revolt on this one. What happens if the dirtbag commits murder? He’s above the law because he is a ” future king” ?”

    Dirty Harry- He will offend again, the smirk on his face when he left Court after this pathetic slap on the wrist pretty much confirmed it.
    Am willing to put money on him getting name suppression next time he offends….He is ‘Royalty’ don’t you know??

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  49. RRM (10,001 comments) says:

    Look at the legend of Maui and see what a real hero does.

    Want something someone else has got? (fire) Steal it from them.

    Someone else going about their business doesn’t suit you? (The sun, moving too fast) Bash the shit out of him and make him do what you want by threat of violence.

    Treasure up for grabs? (The fish) Fight tooth and nail for as much of it as you can get. Fight your own brothers. Fight dirty.

    I would have thought a few convictions would look good on an aspiring Maori king’s cv?

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  50. Griff (8,159 comments) says:

    I received a s106 when I was young.
    The cost of the lawyer was far more than it would have been to just suck it up and plead guilty even though I was not.
    The charge was possession of 0.65grammes of pot Half a joint. It was unknown to me at the time that my older brother had actually hidden it in the room and forgotten about it five years prior .
    I was not referring to s106 just to the fact if you can afforded to pay a lawyer you have more chance of evading prosecution.

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  51. hj (7,062 comments) says:

    Fentex (809 comments) says:

    I remember when we used to put out milk money (4c a bottle) in a milk bottle at night. People used to walk past and steal it (as my sister and her boyfriend out necking in the car observed). A lawyers son got caught and let off for that reason.
    If you don’t have the credentials of a His Majesty they say “so long looser” and throw the book at you.

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  52. RRM (10,001 comments) says:

    I am absolutely sickened that one’s personal status as a member of the Maori racial elite puts this turd above the law.

    Burglary and drunk driving are serious crimes against honest New Zealanders.

    This is a whole new low.

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  53. F E Smith (3,307 comments) says:

    Griff,

    to get a s106 you have to plead guilty. Are you sure that you did not successfully defend the charge? Or do you mean that you should have just accepted being sentenced?

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  54. GPT1 (2,122 comments) says:

    On the face of it this should be appealed. The sentencing Judge is known for being extremely light. A 106 discharge for burg should be almost unheard of let alone a burg on bail.

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  55. Colinxy (25 comments) says:

    Law students getting off shoplifting in Dunedin made it to the news in the Otago Daily Times in the 90s. They were being let off because such convictions would have prevented them from the bar.

    I was under the impression that the public outcry had resolved the matter.

    Perhaps their judge was Philippa Cunningham? There are now two high profile cases stuck to her name now. It would no longer surprise me if she has a history of wet bus ticket across the back of the hand sentences.

    I personally think the judge (Philippa Cunningham) deserves inspection rather than the criminal she left off the hook.

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  56. Griff (8,159 comments) says:

    Sorry FES It was a long time ago.

    On recollected a little more I think I pleaded not guilty and managed to get the charge dismissed.
    More I think on the quality of character witness I had (the son of a very well respected police senior Sargent) than on my defense .
    I still think that the law treats those who can afford a good defense lawyer far more leniently than someone who can not.

    PS its good to see you back posting.

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  57. Mike (491 comments) says:

    The law is definitely bias toward the wealthy, but that is just how it is, a combination of legal realism (judges are wealthy buggers too) and the aforementioned access to better lawyers.

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  58. deadrightkev (507 comments) says:

    There is no Maori King. Yes, the truth and the facts do matter in 2014.

    Tuhetia is a truck driver Tainui figurehead representing the Kingitanga movement which was unceremoniously kicked for touch back in 1860. He has no power, no standing and even less now that we can see the quality of his prodigy coming through.

    To give Tuhetia royal respect for his position is to show support for the murderous rebellious thugs of that movement, Chiefs and tribes that incidentally National has apologised to and paid out hundreds of millions in treaty settlements. Go figure.

    It is the lazy media (including uninformed or agenda based bloggers) in this country that allow this scam to be perpetuated.

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  59. lilman (965 comments) says:

    This decision is totally wrong,in every aspect.
    It’s as bad as the decision not to jail the 3 times over the limit of the driver who killed a woman in New Plymouth.
    Forget racism,just bad justice all round.

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  60. Unity (609 comments) says:

    I thought as much, Kev. Thanks for confirming it. Tainui were a bad lot back in the day. Now they are greedy gravy trainers. It makes me want to spit tacks over the settlement we gave them. For what? They should have paid us!!

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  61. Hair Removal Specialist (80 comments) says:

    Someone at stuff pulled the comments thread. Appalling, just as I was getting stuck into the little weasel. But it is just brilliant how much publicity there has been about this. If he just copped it all on the chin like someone who took responsibility for their own actions would, there would not have been half the publicity. You little wannabe thug, you deserve this all.

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  62. IC5000 (121 comments) says:

    “projectman (198 comments) says:
    July 4th, 2014 at 3:58 pm
    There are numerous examples of young people being discharged without conviction because of a potential impact on their careers. It used to happen regularly with law students (and maybe still does).”

    Yeah, I should have milked this when I was at Otago. What a missed opportunity it would have been and no doubt posting about it on KB would have got the frothers going spastic even more than upperity maaaoris would have.

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  63. adc (595 comments) says:

    well, to his credit, he did plead guilty.

    As for “burglary”… did he break into someone’s house? I heard it was he and some mates swiped some surf-boards from a business.

    Not attempting to condone it, but diversion has been around forever, and all sorts of people get it. It’s purely down to whether the consequences of the conviction would pose a bigger punishment than befits the crime.

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  64. dad4justice (8,303 comments) says:

    No wonder society views judges on the same level as politicians and paedophiles.

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  65. adc (595 comments) says:

    Yeah I think the whole concept of diversion is dubious.

    I guess people deserve a second chance.

    But those with more to lose should be more careful.

    Society holds lawyers, policemen and royalty to a higher standard than the rest of us plebs. And rightly so.

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  66. IC5000 (121 comments) says:

    “Griff (6,531 comments) says:
    July 4th, 2014 at 6:28 pm
    Sorry FES It was a long time ago.

    On recollected a little more I think I pleaded not guilty and managed to get the charge dismissed.
    More I think on the quality of character witness I had (the son of a very well respected police senior Sargent) than on my defense .
    I still think that the law treats those who can afford a good defense lawyer far more leniently than someone who can not.”

    Basically yes. If you’re white, middles class and appear in a suit and tie you more likely to get lenient treatment than the members of the minority underclass appearing fresh from a nigh in the police holding cells.

    As for D4J remark regarding Judges let’s not forget that maori constitute more than 50% of the prison population while comprising of around 10% of the general population so by the standards of his political beliefs they’re doing a bang-up job of protecting his definition of ‘society’.

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  67. wiseowl (928 comments) says:

    Stuff now reporting that the ahole had posted racist slogans on his facebook page in December.

    The story grows.

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  68. big bruv (14,132 comments) says:

    “No wonder society views judges on the same level as politicians and paedophiles.”

    Society does not view all Judges in that way at all.

    What a stupid, and ignorant comment to make.

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  69. Hair Removal Specialist (80 comments) says:

    Wise owl, see radio live’s website. Snapshots from the wannabe gansta’s Facebook page. His attempts to be “cool” would be hilarious if that attitude wasn’t so prevalent.

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  70. tvb (4,494 comments) says:

    She should have refused this application and let the matter be argued before the High Court. Now it is the police who may appeal this decision. I hope they do. To get a 106 for 3 burglaries is taking things too far. The kid is 19 he is old enough to know better. And it seems he committed some of this while on bail that would rule out a 106 in my view. He is a spoilt rich kid who has a strong sense of entitlement to do what he likes.

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  71. Honeybadger (226 comments) says:

    The ‘royal’ lineage is not permanent, others can be chosen, google the late Maori Queen, and find the paragraph on succession, it makes it clear

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  72. freethinker (694 comments) says:

    Big Bruv
    Whilst you are right that not all Judges are viewed by society as idiots, biased or incompetent an increasing number of decisions that do not sit well with a majority opinion of the population are bringing the judiciary into disrespect and distrust and the same applies to the police and other professions – Engineers currently following the resignation of the two involved in the CTV building collapse.

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  73. Unity (609 comments) says:

    Judges need, as part of their acceptance into the Judiciary, to go and live for, say, a year in low decile areas so they can see for themselves just what they are like. They live in their ivory towers and have a privileged life with absolutely no idea of what these people are like and why. Living on a depressed housing estate would wake them up quickly.

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  74. eaglewatch (64 comments) says:

    Apparently he got let off due to the judge reaching the conclusion that the consequences of his actions (if convicted) would outweigh the crime he chose to commit.
    Can someone please explain to me how these consequences are any worse than a self employed contractor (black, white, brown or other) with a wife, four kids to feed, a huge mortgage and business loan to be paid etc, etc, etc, getting caught D.I.C. and having his entire life torn to shreds when he looses everything???
    Taking into account the fact that he was NEVER going to sit on the “mythical Maori throne” as his brother has been groomed from birth for the role, this whole scenario really does stink to high heaven… the consequences for him in terms of becoming the Maori king are simply non-existent and dont even come close to the afore mentioned scenario.
    When you factor in that he was already on bail for previous convictions (theft, burglary and god knows what else)… WTF!!!
    I have heard theories that he was discharged without conviction to keep it consistent with his co-accused being let off, has anyone thought that it may in fact be the reverse? perhaps they were let off in order to enable them to use this theory of consistency thus enabling him to get off the charges???
    If what they were saying is true regarding his co-accused and keeping in mind this theory of consequences outweighing crimes etc, what were the consequences etc in relation to his co-accused… were they also heirs to some mythical maori throne?
    Anybody who thinks this man was discharged for any other reason than him being the son of the Maori king is simply delusional and should promptly make moves towards pulling their cranium from their lower orifice.
    Dover summed it up beautifully, that judge was definitely under some sort of cultural hypnosis, perhaps that’s why she was chosen for the job at hand?
    This makes a complete mockery of this countries judicial system and Korotangi makes a complete mockery of Maoridom in general, his and the judges actions only further promote the racial hatred and separatism that the likes of Hone continually perpetuate and further alienates Maori from mainstream New Zealand.

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