NZ 1st in the world for social and environmental progress

August 13th, 2014 at 4:00 pm by David Farrar

The Social Progressive Imperative publishes an annual Social Progress Index.

Labour and the Greens would have you believe that NZ is appalling on social issues. Their rhetroic for years has been doom and gloom. So where was NZ placed on this index? 100th? 50th? 25th? 10th? 5th?

Nope, 1st.

The top 10 are:

  1. New Zealand
  2. Switzerland
  3. Iceland
  4. Netherlands
  5. Norway
  6. Sweden
  7. Canada
  8. Finland
  9. Denmark
  10. Australia

On some of ths sub-indices, our rankings include:

  • Water & Sanitation 1st
  • Access to Basic Knowledge 2nd
  • Access to Information and Comms 7th
  • Personal Rights 1st
  • Personal Freedom & Choice 1st
  • Tolerance and Inclusion 4th
  • Access to Advanced Education 4th
  • Opportunity 1st
  • Undernourishment 1st
  • Deaths from infectious diseases 3rd
  • Access to piped water 1st
  • Homicide rate 1st
  • Indoor air pollution (lack of deaths) 1st
  • Gender parity in education 1st
  • Press freedom 1st
  • Greenhouse gas emissions 2nd (best)
  • Private property rights 1st
  • Freedom of religion 1st
  • Corruption (lack of) 1st
  • Religious tolerance 1st
  • Community safety net 2nd
  • Tolerance for immigrants 2nd

We are far from perfect, but New Zealand overall is ranked higher than every other country. Think about that, as you consider the Green billboards of gloom and doom.

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NZ 7th in HDI

July 28th, 2014 at 3:00 pm by David Farrar

The UN’s Human Development Index is out and New Zealand is the 7th highest in the world. The top 10 are:

  1. Norway .944
  2. Australia .933
  3. Switzerland .917
  4. Netherlands .915
  5. US .914
  6. Germany .911
  7. New Zealand .910
  8. Canada .902
  9. Singapore .901
  10. Denmark .900

Damn Germans beat us by .001  :-)

The bottom country is Niger at .337 and 18th place.

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Kiwis most satisfied with freedoms

July 11th, 2014 at 2:00 pm by David Farrar

Gallup reports:

 Fewer Americans are satisfied with the freedom to choose what they do with their lives compared with seven years ago — dropping 12 percentage points from 91% in 2006 to 79% in 2013. In that same period, the percentage of Americans dissatisfied with the freedom to choose what they do with their lives more than doubled, from 9% to 21%.

The rise of big Government.

And how about other countries:

Gallup asks people in more than 120 countries each year whether they are satisfied or dissatisfied with the freedom to choose what they do with their lives. In 2006, the U.S. ranked among the highest in the world for people reporting satisfaction with their level of freedom. After seven years and a 12-point decline, the U.S. no longer makes the top quartile worldwide.

So who is top:

gallup

That’s a good table to top.

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For those claiming NZ doesn’t do enough for the environment

July 3rd, 2014 at 4:00 pm by David Farrar

Some pressure groups would have you believe NZ was near the bottom of the world when it comes to the environment and climate change. They seem to regard anything less than abolishing carbon from New Zealand as treason. But the planet and climate section of the Good Country Index has NZ as 7th best out of 125. That’s not something you’ll hear from the Greens.

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NZ 5th for contributing most good to the world

July 2nd, 2014 at 4:00 pm by David Farrar

Business Insider reports:

The Good Country Index ranks 125 nations based on how much they do for others globally in seven areas: science and technology, culture, international peace and security, world order, planet and climate, prosperity and equality, and health and well being.

The ranking was created with the merging of 35 data sets produced by organisations like the UN, WHO, and UNESCO over a period of nearly 3-years.

“What I mean by a ‘good country’ is a country that contributes to the greater good,” Simon Anholt, an independent policy advisor who made the index, told Business Insider. “We’ve given each country a balance-sheet to show at a glance whether it’s a net creditor to mankind, a burden on the planet, or something in between.”

The top 10 are:

  1. Ireland
  2. Finland
  3. Switzerland
  4. Netherlands
  5. New Zealand
  6. Sweden
  7. UK
  8. Norway
  9. Denmark
  10. Belgium

5th isn’t at all bad.

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Economist Rankings

June 13th, 2014 at 11:00 am by David Farrar

A couple of new rankings out by the Economist Intelligence Unit.

Their Business Environment Rankings (ease to do business in) has NZ in 8th place, up three from 11th last time.

And for global food security, we are ranked 13th. The US is 1 and Austria 2. We have improved 0.3 from last time.

And I can’t find a link, but the Dom Post reported we are 5th again on their Democracy Index.

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Air quality up

May 19th, 2014 at 11:00 am by David Farrar

Stats NZ and the Ministry for the Environment released a report on Friday showing air quality has improved in New Zealand. You would have thought that the so called environmental party, the Greens, would have quickly rushed out a press release welcoming this. But it seems they were too busy.

Stats NZ says:

Air quality in New Zealand continues to improve, according to a new report released today by the Ministry for the Environment and Statistics New Zealand, showing lower levels of airborne particles that are associated with health problems.

The 2014 Air domain report focuses on three national air quality indicators – PM10 particulates, (particulate matter 10 micrometres or less in diameter), health impacts from PM10, and vehicle emissions.

“The report not only covers the state of the environment but also what has contributed to the state being the way it is and how the state impacts on New Zealand and New Zealanders,” Secretary for the Environment Paul Reynolds said.

The indicators are showing the state of air quality is improving, and the measurable pressures and impacts reducing.

At a national level, annual PM10 concentrations declined between 2006 and 2012. A number of locations breached PM10health guidelines, particularly in winter due to wood and coal burners.

A range of other pollutants are covered in the report, such as carbon monoxide, lead, sulphur dioxide, and nitrogen dioxide. These mostly met short- and long-term health guidelines, though occasional breaches of guidelines occurred at some sites close to roads or major industry.

The improvement in the state of air quality is reflected by declines in the key pressures on PM10 concentrations. The number of homes using wood and coal has declined since 1996, and on-road transport emissions have declined since 2001 even though vehicle usage has increased. The key pollutants from vehicles have each decreased between 25 and 50 percent brought about by improvements in New Zealand’s vehicle fleet and cleaner fuels.

With the state of New Zealand’s air quality improving, associated health impacts from exposure to PM10 have also declined from 2006 to 2012.

Some data from the report:

  • PM10 concentration down from 16.9 in 2008 to 15.6 in 2012.
  • Our average concentration is the 7th lowest in the OECD
  • Every city measured, except Tauranga is lower in 2012 than 2008
  • Biggest drops are Lower Hutt with 26% and Dunedin with 24%. Also Penrose 18% down.

We take lean air for granted. But you only have to travel overseas to see how fortunate we are.

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NZ military most gay friendly in the world

May 18th, 2014 at 7:00 am by David Farrar

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The Economist reports:

THE armed forces and homosexuality do not make natural bedfellows. Though tales from ancient Greece vaunt the heroism of gay soldiers, modern armies are mostly squeamish on the subject. So when New Zealand’s brass let its soldiers participate in a gay-pride parade, it helped put the country first on a new index that ranks 103 of the world’s armed forces by how open they are to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people. Countries at the bottom of the list—compiled by The Hague Centre for Strategic Studies, based on 21 indicators across five categories—are mostly those where homosexuality is a crime or considered an illness. Yet surprises abound. America’s relatively low ranking at 40th is largely because it bans transgender personnel, though it has gay-friendly policies. In Israel, where military issues are ever-present, the army seems more progressive than society. Only 40% of the population accept homosexuality, whereas the armed forces completely opened up to LGBT people in 1993, almost a decade before Britain (which is tied for second).

Anyone who thinks gays or lesbians shouldn’t be soldiers should go try saying that to an Israeli combat unit!

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NZ life expectancy

May 17th, 2014 at 10:00 am by David Farrar

The Herald reports:

Children born in New Zealand in 2012 are likely to live into their 80s – almost at the top of the 194 countries covered in a recent World Health Organisation report.

The report ranks New Zealand males as having the fourth-highest life expectancy and females seventh.

The figures were for a baby born in 2012, and showed an increased life expectancy around the world, which does not surprise a local demographer. In poor countries it was because fewer children were dying before their fifth birthday and in wealthier countries it was because fewer people were dying of heart disease and strokes before their 60th birthday, the WHO said.

New Zealand men were expected to live to, on average, 80.2 years of age – the same as Singaporean, Israeli and Italian men. Women should live to 84, the same as Portuguese women.

The highest life expectancy overall is Japan at 84 years. The lowest is Sierra Leone at 46 years.

For women, the highest is Japan at 87 tears and lowest Sierra Leone at 46 years.

For men the highest is San Marino at 82 years and lowest Sierra Leone at 45 years.

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How NZ is ranking

April 7th, 2014 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

Have had a quick look through the global country rankings that have come out in the last year or two, to see how NZ is placed. Have to say pretty good overall. Here’s what I’ve got, remembering there are around 200 countries:

  • Rule of Law 6th
  • Economic Freedom 5th
  • Best to do business in 2nd
  • Least Corrupt 1st
  • Open Data 4th
  • Prosperous 5th
  • Best to be a woman 7th
  • Competitiveness 18th
  • Peaceful 3rd
  • Democratic 5th
  • Human Development 6th
  • Best for working women 1st
  • Freedom 1st
  • Open Budget 2nd
  • Best to be a mother 4th
  • Humanitarian responses 3rd
  • Smallest gender gap 5th
  • Generous 1st
  • Least failed 7th
  • Trade competitiveness 4th
  • Social progress 1st

You have to say overall New Zealand is a pretty awesome place!

You also wonder at those who claim the neo-liberal reforms have made New Zealand such an awful place that we need to over-throw them.

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NZ No 1 for social progress in the world

April 3rd, 2014 at 4:30 pm by David Farrar

The Herald reports:

A Washington-based think-tank has found that New Zealand is the most socially advanced country in the world.

The Social Progress Imperative, whose advisory board is led by Harvard economist Professor Michael Porter, has put New Zealand first out of 130 countries based on 54 indicators of social progress.

The country tops the world on indicators of personal rights and freedoms, and comes in the top four for water and sanitation, access to schooling and tertiary education, and tolerance and inclusion of minority groups.

That’s excellent. We’re not No 1 in everything but when you take all 54 indicators together, we’re at the top.

The top 10 countries are:

  1. New Zealand 88.24
  2. Switzerland 88.19
  3. Iceland 88.07
  4. Netherlands 87.37
  5. Norway 87.12
  6. Sweden 87.08
  7. Canada 86.95
  8. Finland 86.91
  9. Denmark 86.55
  10. Australia 86.10

It scores a low 28th on nutrition and basic medical care partly because of a relatively high death rate for women in childbirth, 35th for health and wellbeing partly because of high obesity and suicide rates, and 32nd for ecosystem sustainability.

So definitely still more work to do in some areas.

Think-tank director Michael Green, a London-based economist and author ofPhilanthrocapitalism: How Giving Can Save the World, said New Zealand’s placing as the world’s most socially advanced nation contrasted with its 25th place in GDP per person.

“In terms of converting economic output into quality of life, New Zealand is doing really well,” he said.

It would be good to also lift the GDP.

Social Development Minister Paula Bennett said: “This report is great news and it backs up what we all know – that we live in a fantastic country.”

Labour social development spokeswoman Sue Moroney said New Zealand’s high scored reflected “Labour’s progressive agenda” in building up public health and education over many decades.

Interesting that Paula just says it reflects well on the country while Moroney tries to have her party claim credit for it!

In terms of the three major category groupings, NZ was:

  • Opportunity 1st
  • Foundations of Wellbeing 6th
  • Basic Human Needs 18th
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NZ 4th for trade competitiveness

April 3rd, 2014 at 10:00 am by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

New Zealand is well ahead of Australia in trade competitiveness, according to a new international report.

The Geneva-based World Economic Forum’s enabling trade index for 2014 ranks New Zealand fourth out of 138 countries, up from fifth when the index was last released in 2012.

4th isn’t bad.

It assessed countries in four areas – market access, border administration, infrastructure, and the operating environment.

New Zealand performed well in most categories, getting an overall score of 5.2 out of seven.

However, it rated poorly in foreign-market access, coming in 65th at just 2.6 out of seven.

A big part of this was due to high cost or delays caused by international transportation, which the report found to be the most problematic factor for both importers and exporters.

Almost one in five respondents (18.7 per cent) picked it as the biggest problem for exporting, narrowly ahead of tariff barriers abroad (18.4 per cent).

Still a lot of work to be done, but things are looking good for exporters and importers.

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NZ 6th for rule of law

March 7th, 2014 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

The Herald reports:

New Zealand has been ranked sixth overall in a global index measuring the rule of law.

The World Justice Project’s Rule of Law Index surveyed 99 countries on eight categories including government accountability, crime, corruption, fundamental rights, access to justice and order and security.

New Zealand came sixth after Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and the Netherlands.

That’s not bad.

New Zealand also came second in the index’s open government category – beaten only by Norway – and third in the absence of corruption category.

Even better.

The country reports are here. NZ’s sub-rankings are:

  1. Open Government 2nd
  2. Absence of Corruption 3rd
  3. Constraints on Government Powers 4th
  4. Regulatory Environment 5th
  5. Fundamental Rights 7th
  6. Civil Justice 9th
  7. Order and Security 11th
  8. Criminal Justice 12th
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NZ 5th for economic freedom

January 16th, 2014 at 2:00 pm by David Farrar

The Heritage Foundation has released the 2014 economic freedom index. The top 10 are:

  1. Hong Kong 90.1 (+0.8)
  2. Singapore 78.4 (+1.4)
  3. Australia 82.0 (-0.6)
  4. Switzerland 81.6 (+0.6)
  5. New Zealand 81.2 (-0.2)
  6. Canada 80.2 (+0.8)
  7. Chile 78.7 (-0.3)
  8. Mauritius 76.5 (-0.4)
  9. Ireland 76.2 (+0.5)
  10. Denmark 76.1 (nc)

Only six countries are ranked free (above 80), 27 are mainly free (70 – 80), 56 moderately free (60 to 70), 61 mostly unfree (50 to 60) and 27 repressed (under 50).

The bottom five are:

  1. North Korea 1.0
  2. Cuba 28.7
  3. Zimbabwe 35.5
  4. Venezuela 36.3
  5. Eritrea 38.5

NZ’s rankings are below

Read more about New Zealand Economy.
See more from the 2014 Index.

The level of government spending is the only area in which we score really badly. They state:

The overall tax burden equals 31.7 percent of gross domestic income. Government spending equates to about 47.5 percent of GDP, and public debt is steady at 38 percent of GDP.

All need to drop down.

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NZ 2nd place country to do business in

December 8th, 2013 at 12:00 pm by David Farrar

The Herald reports:

New Zealand has been named the world’s second best country to do business in, behind only resurgent Ireland in the annual list compiled by Forbes’ magazine.

The survey found New Zealand had the best scores among all countries for personal freedom and investor protection, as well as lack of red tape and corruption. …

Despite being the smallest economy to make the top 10, with an annual Gross Domestic Product of US$170 billion, New Zealand was one of the fastest growing last year with GDP jumping by 2.5 per cent.

Unless we vote for tax hikes, more debt and spending, and nationalisation.

The index is based on 11 factors, and the ranking for NZ for each is:

  1. property rights – 2nd
  2. innovation – 25th
  3. taxes – 21st
  4. technology – 24th
  5. corruption – 1st
  6. personal freedom – 1st
  7. trade freedom – 10th
  8. monetary freedom – 9th
  9. red tape – 1st
  10. investor protection – 1st
  11. stock market performance – 36th

So the areas for improvement are innovation, technology and reducing the tax burden – plus improving the stock market performance.

 

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NZ remains least corrupt country

December 6th, 2013 at 3:00 pm by David Farrar

Transparency International has found the NZ public sector remains the least corrupt in the world. The top 10 countries are (100 means perfect):

  • New Zealand 91/100 (+1)
  • Denmark 91 (+1)
  • Finland 89 (-1)
  • Sweden 89(+1)
  • Norway 86 (+1)
  • Singapore 86 (-1)
  • Switzerland 85 (-1)
  • Netherlands 83 (-1)
  • Australia 81 (-4)
  • Canada 81 (-3)

At the bottom is Afghanistan, Somalia and North Korea on 8.

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No room for complacency

December 4th, 2013 at 2:00 pm by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

Kiwi students are falling behind the rest of the world in reading, maths and science, a global education report has revealed.

New Zealand’s education ranking has fallen from seventh to 18th in science, from 12th to 23rd in maths, and from seventh to 13th in reading, according to a report released by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) last night.

Just over 4000 15-year-old Kiwi students took part in the assessment, which is done every three years.

Opposition MPs say students are falling behind because teachers are too busy filling in government forms to concentrate on teaching.

But Education Minister Hekia Parata pointed the finger at issues to which the study group has been exposed, including the bedding-in of a new curriculum, under-investment in teachers, and a poor culture of behaviour in some schools.

“This Government is addressing all of these long-standing issues,” she said.

The students measured by the report were in the education system from 2001 to 2012, which meant they had never been caught by the national standards system, Parata said.

This should be a wake up call for those who resist change in the education system. Stagnation and decline is not acceptable. If you talk to secondary teachers, you’ll know that it is too late for them to do much with a student if they get to secondary school with inadequate literacy and numeracy schools.

We’ve had the bigotry of low expectations for too long, where the 15% tail are allowed to fail. Not everyone will be able to get good qualifications, but everyone must leave school with functional literacy and numeracy.

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NZ imprisonment rates

November 25th, 2013 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

Most of us have probably heard at some stage a stat that NZ has the second highest imprisonment rate in the world. Well it seems that stat is massively wrong.

Stats Chat blogs that in fact NZ has only the 8th highest in the OECD and the 74th highest in the world.

Would still be nice for them to be lower – but than comes about if we have fewer serious or repeat criminals – and the recent trend is for both the violent crime rate and the imprisonment rate to be dropping.

Not sure how the myth started of NZ having the second highest rate. Maybe it once was true – but clearly isn’t today.

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OECD scores NZ Government highly

November 16th, 2013 at 12:00 pm by David Farrar

The OECD has published ratings for its members governments. The overall data is pretty good for New Zealand. Some highlights:

  • Citizens rate government satisfaction 10% higher than OECD average
  • ICT expenditure by Govt is highest in OECD at 2%
  • Trust in Government up 2% since 2007 (down 5% for overall OECD)
  • Income inequality (Gini coefficient) reduces from 0.45 to 0.32 after tax and welfare transfers.
  • Education performance on PISA is 521 compared to OECD average of 495 despite average expenditure per student of US$70,100 compared to OECD of $83,500.
  • Govt employees make up 9.7% of labour force compared to OECD of 15.5%
  • Women are 29% of Ministers compared to 25% for OECD
  • Confidence in government is 61% (OECD 40%), Police 83% (72%), Education 71% (66%), Health care system 83% (71%) and Justice system 58% (51%)

On the not so good side:

  • Deficit at 7.5% of GDP is higher than OECD average of 3.5%. But this is 2010 data which includes earthquake. Still shows how important it is to reduce and eliminate the deficit.
  • Government senior managers paid $397,000 on average compared to $232,00 OECD average (in US$ PPP)!

 

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NZ 4th for open data

November 12th, 2013 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

The Open Data Institute has ranked NZ 4th best in the world for open data in its 2013 report. The top countries are:

  1. UK
  2. US
  3. Sweden
  4. NZ
  5. Denmark/Norway

NZ scored 82/100 for readiness, 65 for implementation and 90 for impact. The comments on NZ are:

The OGD initiative in New Zealand is part of a wider Open and Transparent Government Agenda, initially driven by the ‘Open Government Information and Data Re-use Working Group’ established in 2009, and later by the 2011 ‘Declaration on Open and Transparent Government’ approved by the Cabinet in August 2011. This declaration mandates public service departments, notably with the explicit inclusion of the New Zealand Intelligence Service, to “commit to releasing high value public data actively for re-use…in accordance with the NZGOAL Review and Release process”. NZGOAL is the New Zealand Government Open Access and Licensing Framework, based on the Creative Commons framework.

The New Zealand Government has put considerable effort into monitoring progress towards open government and open data, with Agencies asked to regularly report to Ministers on their progress, case studies collated on re-uses of open data, and an annual reporting process on adoption of the Declaration on Open and Transparent Government. New Zealand was one of the few countries in the Barometer where a significant emphasis on environmental impacts of open data could be observed, with a wide range of environmental datasets made available and seeing re-use, particularly in supporting coordination around extreme weather and geological events.

Bill English has commented:

“This is a real coup for New Zealand.  The Barometer is the first survey of global trends which ranks 77 countries on how they release their public data and the benefits those initiatives have for citizens and the economy,” says Mr English. 

“This is proof we are lifting the performance of the public sector through transparency and shared information. New Zealand was commended for its Declaration on Open and Transparent Government, its release of open data, in particular, maps, land ownership and census data and for regular reporting to Ministers.”

“The open government data work aligns with the Government’s better public service targets that New Zealand businesses have a one-stop online shop for all government support and can complete their transactions with the Government easily in a digital environment,” says Mr Tremain.

Bill deserves much credit for this. He has pushed open data from the very top, backed up with a lot of enthusiasm from many in the public service, and the wider community.

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NZ 5th most prosperous in the world

October 31st, 2013 at 3:00 pm by David Farrar

The 2013 Legatum Prosperity Index has just been published. NZ is in 5th place out of 142 countries, which is the highest rating for an Asia-Pacific country. The top 10 are:

  1. Norway
  2. Switzerland
  3. Canada
  4. Sweden
  5. New Zealand
  6. Denmark
  7. Australia
  8. Finland
  9. Netherlands
  10. Luxembourg

The bottom 10 are:

  1. Chad
  2. Central African Republic
  3. Congo
  4. Afghanistan
  5. Burundi
  6. Togo
  7. Yemen
  8. Guinea
  9. Haiti
  10. Angola

For NZ the sub-indices were:

  • Economy 17th
  • Entrepreneurship & Opportunity 15th
  • Governance 2nd
  • Education 1st
  • Health 20th
  • Safety & Security 15th
  • Personal Freedom 5th
  • Social Capital 2nd

There’s a lot worse places to live!

 

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NZ in top ten for women

October 28th, 2013 at 10:00 am by David Farrar

The Herald reports:

New Zealand is among the top 10 best places to be a woman, according to a worldwide report on gender equality.

It ranked seventh out of 136 countries in the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Index 2013, with narrow gaps between the sexes in the health, education, economic and political sectors.

New Zealand was at number one – equal with several European countries – for educational attainment, which included literacy rates and enrolment in primary, secondary and tertiary education.

In terms of educational achievement, women are not just at a par with men, but streaks ahead.

It would be interesting to see a large table of countries for men also. I don’t mean to suggest that in most areas men do not have advantages – they do. But in some areas such as education, health, life expectancy men constantly do worse and it would be interesting to see what the gaps are in different countries.

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Leading the world in …

October 24th, 2013 at 10:00 am by David Farrar

5414

You can click on the image for a larger copy. From here.

The list of top ranks for each country range from the amusing to the fascinating.

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NZ competitiveness

September 7th, 2013 at 4:00 pm by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

For the first time, New Zealand is ahead of Australia in the Global Competitive Index.

The annual report by the World Economic Forum shows New Zealand is 18th, up five places in the past year. Australia dropped one place to 21st.

New Zealand’s rise reflected a steady economic recovery and “prudent pro-growth policies”, said Oliver Hartwich, executive director of the New Zealand Initiative, which helped compile the survey data.

New Zealand was ranked among the top 10 in the world for the quality of its institutions, health and primary education, higher education, goods and labour market efficiency, and financial markets development, the report shows.

Hartwich cautioned against complacency. The country had failed to make any improvement on its innovation and business sophistication factors, ranking 27th globally, behind Puerto Rico and Qatar.

Switzerland, which was ranked second in the world for innovation and business sophistication, was named the most competitive economy in the world for a fifth year. The next most competitive countries were Finland, Japan, Germany, Sweden, the United States, the Netherlands, Israel, Taiwan and Britain.

Good to be improving. Global competitiveness is a key factor in prosperity – not increased barriers and destroying competition.

The full report is here. Our individual rankings are:

  • Institutions 2nd
  • Infrastructure 27th
  • Macroeconomic environment 43rd
  • Health and primary education 5th
  • Higher education & training 9th
  • Goods market efficiency 9th
  • Labor market efficiency 8th
  • Financial market development 4th
  • Technological readiness 24th
  • Market size 62nd
  • Business sophistication 26th
  • Innovation 26th

The most problematic factors for doing business were:

  1. Inadequate supply of infrastructure
  2. Inadequately educated workforce
  3. Insufficient capacity to innovate
  4. Inefficient government bureaucracy
  5. Access to financing
  6. Tax rates
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7th Global Peace Index

June 14th, 2013 at 7:00 am by David Farrar

The 2013 Global Peace Index finds:

  • The world has become 5% less peaceful since 2008
  • Europe is the most peaceful region, with 13 of the top 20 most peaceful countries
  • War ravaged Afghanistan returns to the bottom of the index
  • Syria’s GPI score has fallen by 70% sine 2008
  • The total economic impact of containing violence is estimated to be US$9.46 trillion in 2012
  • The top three most peaceful countries are Iceland, Denmark and New Zealand.
  • With a newly elected government and a steady recovery from the 2011 turmoil, Libya had the biggest improvement in peace score since last year.
  • The three least peaceful countries are Afghanistan, Somalia and Syria.
  • Syria’s score dropped by the largest margin, with the biggest ever score deterioration in the history of the GPI.

So if we can just get Iceland and Demark to invade each other, we’ll be number one!

The top 10 are:

  1. Iceland 1.16
  2. Denmark 1.21
  3. NZ 1.24
  4. Austria 1.25
  5. Switzerland 1.27
  6. Japan 1.29
  7. Finland 1.30
  8. Canada 1.31
  9. Sweden 1.32
  10. Belgium 1.34

Australia is 16th=, UK 44th. The summary for NZ is:

The majority of the GPI’s measures of safety and security suggest that New Zealand society is broadly harmonious; violent demonstrations are highly unlikely, while homicides and terrorist acts are very rare. The jailed population dropped, but not sufficiently to have an impact on the country’s overall GPI score; at 194 per 100,000, it remains higher than that of most OECD countries, notably Japan (55) and Switzerland (76). New Zealand’s political scene remained stable, with support for the prime minister, John Key, and the ruling centre-right National Party holding up amid confidence over the government’s handling of the economy, which grew by 2.5% in 2012. New Zealand maintained harmonious relations with its neighbours in 2012; links with Australia are underpinned by the 1983 Closer Economic Relations (CER) agreement. The two governments are negotiating a protocol on a common border, pension portability and joint investment, all of which would move the countries closer to their goal of forming a single economic market

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