Parliament 9 March 2016

March 9th, 2016 at 11:42 am by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. FLETCHER TABUTEAU to the Minister of Revenue: Is he satisfied with all legislation regarding tax on property sales to foreigners?
  2. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  3. Dr PARMJEET PARMAR to the Minister of Finance: What steps is the Government taking to support resilience and growth in the New Zealand economy?
  4. JACINDA ARDERN to the Minister for Small Business: Does he agree with the statement made by Hon Bill English in the House yesterday regarding Fonterra’s policy of paying small businesses up to an additional 61 days late, that “these are freely transacting people doing business. Any party to the transaction is able to choose whether the terms are suitable for them, or not”?
  5. METIRIA TUREI to the Minister of Finance: Ka tū a ia i runga i te mana o tāna tauākī mō te ahu miraka kau, “is an industry that’s going to be under pressure”?
    • Translation: Does he stand by his statement that dairy “is an industry that’s going to be under pressure”?
  6. SIMON O’CONNOR to the Minister of Health: Can he confirm that rheumatic fever rates have dropped 45 percent since 2012?
  7. CHRIS HIPKINS to the Minister of Education: Is she satisfied that students completing NCEA qualifications have the basic functional literacy and numeracy skills they will require for further study or employment?
  8. MARAMA FOX to the Minister of Health: Following the recent release of the rheumatic fever statistics, what steps is he taking to address the rate of rheumatic fever amongst whanau living in overcrowded housing conditions?
  9. SCOTT SIMPSON to the Minister for the Environment: What new details of the Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary have been announced and how will these help protect the 620,000 square kilometres of the Pacific Ocean covered by this initiative?
  10. Dr DAVID CLARK to the Minister for Economic Development: On what date did he first become aware of payroll problems at the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment and what action did he take?
  11. Dr JIAN YANG to the Minister of Science and Innovation: How is the Government using science and research to help the development of children and young people?
  12. CATHERINE DELAHUNTY to the Minister for the Environment: Has he received any advice that New Zealanders would prefer to wade rather than swim in our lakes and rivers?

National: Four questions on the economy, rheumatic fever, Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary and science and research

Labour: Four questions on PM standing by his statements, Fonterra, NCEA and MBIE payroll

Greens: Two questions on dairy and water

NZ First: One question on tax on property

Maori Party: One question on rheumatic fever

Budget Policy Statement 3.00 pm to 5.00 pm

A debate consisting of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each on the Finance and Expenditure Committee report on the 2016 Budget Policy Statement

Government Bills 5.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

New Zealand Business Number Bill – second reading continued

This bill enables certain entities to obtain, or be allocated, a New Zealand Business Number and to be registered on a New Zealand Business Number Register

  • Introduced March 2015
  • 1st reading: May 2015, passed unanimously
  • SC report: September 2015, supported with amendments by the majority, Labour dissenting

The second reading debate has 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes, so a maximum debate of two hours. There are three speeches remaining.

Māori Language (Te Reo Māori) Bill – second reading

This bill repeals the Māori Language Act 1987 and Part 4A of the Broadcasting Act 1989 to establish an independent entity, Te Mātāwai, to provide leadership on behalf of iwi and Māori regarding the health of the Māori language.

  • Introduced July 2014
  • 1st reading: July 2014, passed unanimously but Greens and NZ First against (forgot to call for a party vote)
  • SC report: February 2016, supported unanimously with amendments

The second reading debate has 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes, so a maximum debate of two hours.

Weathertight Homes Resolution Services Amendment Bill – third reading

The bill amends the Weathertight Home Resolution Services Act 2006 to remove any doubt about the validity of the criteria, deem certain claims determined as ineligible to be eligible, and to widen the definition of qualifying claimant.

  • Introduced: February 2015
  • 1st reading: March 2015, passed unanimously
  • Select Committee report: July 2015, supported unanimously with amendments
  • 2nd reading: September 2015, passed unanimously
  • Committee of the whole House: February 2016, passed unanimously with amendments

There is no time limit for the committee stage but it is estimated to be a three hour debate as the bill has two parts and preliminary provisions to debate. One part has been agreed to, so there are probably one to two hours remaining.

 

 

Parliament 8 March 2016

March 8th, 2016 at 12:03 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. BRETT HUDSON to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received about progress in improving New Zealand’s external financial position – particularly in bringing down the longstanding current account deficit?
  2. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  3. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he have confidence in all his Ministers?
  4. METIRIA TUREI to the Minister for State Owned Enterprises:Does he support Landcorp’s recent decision to significantly reduce its dairy footprint?
  5. BARBARA KURIGER to the Minister of Health: Can he confirm preliminary data from the National Patient Flow Project, which shows that 90 percent of patients referred by their GP to a hospital specialist between 1 July and 30 September 2015 were accepted for a First Specialist Assessment?
  6. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: When was he informed that the Ministry of Health request for a capital injection to fund the fit out of its new headquarters was not supported by Treasury, and “exposed a serious failure of financial management within the Ministry”?
  7. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  8. JAN LOGIE to the Prime Minister: Will he return the Minister for Women to Cabinet, to mark International Women’s Day?
  9. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he agree with the Prime Minister that “when the primary sector sneezes, the New Zealand economy catches a cold”?
  10. PAUL FOSTER-BELL to the Minister of Education: What reports has she received on NCEA level 2 results for 2015?
  11. STUART NASH to the Minister of Police: Does she have confidence in the Commissioner of Police?
  12. JAMI-LEE ROSS to the Minister of Trade: What opportunities do businesses and the wider public have to seek information on the Trans-Pacific Partnership?

National: Four questions on the current account deficit, hospitals, NCEA and TPP

Labour: Four questions on PM confidence in Ministers, Ministry of Health, primary sector and confidence in Police Commissioner

Greens: Two questions on Landcorp and International Women’s Day

NZ First: Two identical questions on PM standing by his statements

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

Appropriation (2014/15 Confirmation and Validation) Bill – second reading

This bill confirms and validates unappropriated expenses and capital expenditure incurred for the 2014/15 financial year.

  • Introduced: December 2015
  • 1st reading: March 2016

There is no debate on this second reading.

Employment Standards Legislation Bill – committee stage

This bill deals with zero hour contracts and extends paid parental leave.

  • Introduced: August 2015
  • 1st reading: September 2015, passed 107 to 14 with Greens opposed
  • SC report: February 2016, supported unanimously with amendments
  • 2nd reading: March 2016, passed 94 to 25 with Greens and NZ First opposed

There is no time limit for the committee stage but it is estimated to be a six hour debate as the bill has five parts and preliminary provisions to debate.

There are three SOPs – one each from the Minister Michael Woodhouse, Denise Roche and Clayton Mitchell.

Building (Earthquake-prone Buildings) Amendment Bill – committee stage

The bill proposes amendments to the Building Act 2004 to improve the system for managing earthquake-prone buildings.

  • Introduced: December 2013
  • 1st reading: March 2014, passed 106 to 14 with Greens opposed
  • Select Committee report: September 2015, supported unanimously with amendments
  • 2nd reading: March 2016, passed 120 to 1 with ACT opposed

There is no time limit for the committee stage but it is estimated to be a three hour debate as the bill has two parts and preliminary provisions to debate.

There is one SOP from the Minister Nick Smith.

Parliament 2 March 2016

March 2nd, 2016 at 11:58 am by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. METIRIA TUREI to the Minister for Building and Housing: Has the Minister received advice on how many children’s lives would be saved and how many child hospital admissions would be prevented by a rental housing warrant of fitness; if yes, what are those figures?
  2. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he have confidence in his Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment, given the Student Loan Scheme Annual Report 2015 forecasts student loan debt will hit $15.458 billion this year?
  3. MATT DOOCEY to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received showing the New Zealand economy is strengthening and exports are diversifying despite uncertainty in the global economic outlook?
  4. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Revenue: When was he first advised that employers owed $29.3 million in contributions to KiwiSaver accounts, and what action has he taken in response to this?
  5. FLETCHER TABUTEAU to the Associate Minister for Primary Industries: What is the Government doing to increase log processing in New Zealand to maximise wealth for the regions that produce them?
  6. MELISSA LEE to the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment: What progress is being made to train more of the skilled graduates needed by New Zealand’s growing ICT industry?
  7. JACINDA ARDERN to the Minister of Justice: Is she satisfied with all of the outcomes of her predecessor’s family law reforms?
  8. ALFRED NGARO to the Minister for Social Housing: What announcements has she made about increasing emergency housing places in Auckland?
  9. CATHERINE DELAHUNTY to the Minister for the Environment: Does he agree with his Government’s reported comments that it is unrealistic for New Zealand’s rivers to be swimmable all the time, and does he think that represents an acceptable and aspirational vision for New Zealand’s waterways?
  10. DAVID SEYMOUR to the Minister for State Owned Enterprises: What has been the return on equity for Landcorp over the past three years?
  11. MEKA WHAITIRI to the Minister for Māori Development: Does he believe the recent consultation hui on Te Ture Whenua Māori Reform has given him a mandate for land reform; if so, why?
  12. IAN McKELVIE to the Minister for Primary Industries: How will the Trans-Pacific Partnership support new and emerging primary industries?

National: Four questions on the economy, ICt industry, Aucklanfd housing and TPP

Labour: Four questions on student debt, KiwiSaver, family law reforms, and Te Ture Whenua Māori Reform

Greens: Two questions on rental properties and water

NZ First: One question on log precessing

ACT: One question on Landcorp

General Debate 3.00 pm to 4.00 pm

12 speeches of five minutes each for a maximum of one hour.

Private Bills 4.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 9.30 pm

Papawai and Kaikokirikiri Trusts Amendment Bill – first reading

This bill describes the relationship between Papawai and Kaikokirikiri Trusts Board, the Bishop of Te Upoko o Te Ika, and tangata whenua of Wairarapa and establishes a more robust nomination process of board members; provides a fairer distribution of funds for tangata whenua of Wairarapa; and facilitates the long-term development of lands. It is in the name of Wairarapa MP Alistair Scott.

  • Introduced: December 2015

Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind Act Repeal Bill

This bill will repeal the Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind Act 2002, which is now spent. It is in the name of Nicky Wagner.

  • Introduced: December 2015

Members’ Bill 9.30 pm to 10.00 pm

 

Parliament 1 March 2016

March 1st, 2016 at 11:57 am by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. KANWALJIT SINGH BAKSHI to the Minister of Finance: How does the outlook for the New Zealand economy compare with other developed countries?
  2. METIRIA TUREI to the Minister for Building and Housing: Will the Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill guarantee that no New Zealand renter will live in a cold, damp, mouldy house that makes them sick; if not, why not?
  3. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he have confidence in his Minister of Health, given the Minister’s statement regarding funding of Keytruda that Pharmac “haven’t got the money at the moment…that’s the issue”?
  4. TODD MULLER to the Minister for Social Development: What recent announcements has she made on the whole of government Gang Action Plan?
  5. EUGENIE SAGE to the Minister for the Environment: When he said last year that the Marine Reserves Act “is now outdated. It does not provide for protection in the huge Exclusive Economic Zone”, was he saying that a new Act should provide for new marine reserves in our EEZ; if so, why has his position changed?
  6. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: Does he stand by all his statements?
  7. DAVID BENNETT to the Minister of Transport: What recent progress has the Government made on the Waikato Expressway Road of National Significance?
  8. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: What was the dollar figure of net core Crown debt when he took office as Minister, and what is that dollar figure today?
  9. STUART SMITH to the Minister for the Environment: What progress is the Government making on improving management of fresh water, and particularly in addressing the problem of stock polluting rivers, lakes, and wetlands?
  10. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements; if so, why?
  11. MAUREEN PUGH to the Minister for Primary Industries: How will the Trans-Pacific Partnership support growth in our horticulture industry?
  12. Hon DAVID PARKER to the Minister for Economic Development: Does he stand by the statement reportedly made on his behalf two weeks ago that the Saudi sheep deal is Murray McCully’s and all questions should be directed at him?

National: Five questions on the economy, gangs, Waikato Expressway, water and TPP

Labour: Four questions on Pharmac, Health Minister standing by statements, Crown debt and Saudi farm

Greens: Two questions on rental properties and the EEZ

NZ First: One question on PM standing by his statements

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

Prime Minister’s Statement

There are four hours and 36 minutes remaining of the 13 hour debate. So 28 speeches to go.

Building (Earthquake-prone Buildings) Amendment Bill – second reading continued

The bill proposes amendments to the Building Act 2004 to improve the system for managing earthquake-prone buildings.

  • Introduced: December 2013
  • 1st reading: March 2014, passed 106 to 14 with Greens opposed
  • Select Committee report: September 2015, supported unanimously with amendments

The second reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours. There are three speeches remaining.

Radiation Safety Bill – third reading

The bill replaces the Radiation Protection Act 1965 to “provide an enhanced legislative framework for radiation safety that responds effectively to the range of technological, scientific, and organisational changes that have occurred over the last 5 decades” and also enables “ratification of key relevant international instruments.”

  • Introduced: December 2014
  • 1st reading: March 2015, passed unanimously
  • Select Committee report: August 2015, supported unanimously with amendments
  • 2nd reading: November 2015, passed unanimously
  • Committee of the whole House: February 2016, passed unanimously

The third reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

Parliament 18 February 2016

February 18th, 2016 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. RON MARK to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements on the flag referenda?
  2. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: Will he make good on the promises he made on radio yesterday to the Canterbury District Health Board that “if they need more money for mental health this year, they need to just tell me exactly what they need, because the Government is listening”?
  3. ANDREW BAYLY to the Minister of Finance: What recent announcements has the Government made around its programme of Social Investment?
  4. PHIL TWYFORD to the Minister for Building and Housing:When the Prime Minister said first-home buyers in Auckland might have to consider an apartment in order to get on to the property ladder, did he mean that the Government supports the increased intensification now being considered by the Independent Hearings Panel?
  5. JONO NAYLOR to the Minister for Social Development: What reports has she received on the number of children living in benefit-dependent households?
  6. KEVIN HAGUE to the Minister of Health: What is the Government’s estimate of the likely extra cost faced by Pharmac for each of the TPP’s provisions relating to transparency processes, patent term extensions for pharmaceuticals, and data protection extension for biologics?
  7. RON MARK to the Minister of Immigration: Has he had cause for concern about the effects of the current Government’s immigration policy; if so, what are the concerns?
  8. PAUL FOSTER-BELL to the Minister of Tourism: What reports has he received about the growth in number of tourist guest nights?
  9. Dr DAVID CLARK to the Minister of Trade: Did his predecessor Hon Tim Groser ask MFAT officials negotiating the TPP agreement to preserve the right for a future New Zealand Government to ban the purchase of residential land by non-resident foreign speculators?
  10. SCOTT SIMPSON to the Minister for Primary Industries: What recent reports has he received on growth in seafood exports?
  11. Hon DAVID CUNLIFFE to the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment: Does he have full confidence in the Tertiary Education Commission’s oversight of tertiary education funding?
  12. MARAMA DAVIDSON to the Minister for Climate Change Issues: When she said this week at the Pacific climate change conference that “Pacific voices are heard loud and clear at the negotiating table, and there are some things that we hold different views on”, what were the specific points of difference that she was referring to?

National: Four questions on social investment, benefit levels, tourism and seafood exports

Labour: Four questions on Canterbury DHB funding, house affordability, TPP and tertiary education

Greens: Two questions on TPP and climate change

NZ First: Two questions on flag referenda and immigration

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm

Home and Community Support (Payment for Travel Between Clients) Settlement Bill – third reading

This Bill implements a settlement between the Crown, District Health Boards, providers of home and community-based care and support services, and certain unions on behalf of home and community-based care and support employees.

  • Introduced September 2015
  • 1st reading: October 2015, passed unanimously
  • SC report: December 2015, supported with amendments without dissent
  • 2nd reading: February 2016, passed unanimously
  • Committee of the Whole: February 2016, passed unanimously

The third reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

Social Housing Reform (Transaction Mandate Bill) – third reading

This bill amends the Housing Corporation Act 1974 to provide designated Ministers with the authority to transfer Housing New Zealand Corporation properties.

  • Introduced July 2015
  • 1st reading: August 2015, passed 63 to 58 with Labour, Greens and NZ First opposed
  • SC report: December 2015, supported with amendments unanimously
  • 2nd reading: February 2016, passed 63 to 58 with Labour, Greens and NZ First opposed
  • Committee of the Whole, February 2016, passed 63 to 58 with Labour, Greens and NZ First opposed

The third reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

 

Parliament 16 February 2016

February 16th, 2016 at 1:25 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. Dr JIAN YANG to the Minister of Finance: How will Budget 2016 support further growth in jobs and wages, while maintaining the Government’s fiscal management?
  2. JAMES SHAW to the Minister of Finance: Has he read recent economic reports from ASB and Westpac and is he planning on doing anything differently as a result?
  3. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement regarding Labour’s fees-free post-school study policy that “the question will simply be that if it is completely free, will there be any control on the quality”?
  4. MAHESH BINDRA to the Minister of Corrections: Is she aware that a prisoner escaped from Middlemore Hospital in December 2015; if so, when was she made aware of the incident?
  5. JONATHAN YOUNG to the Minister of Communications: What recent announcements has she made on the progress of Ultra-Fast Broadband and Rural Broadband Initiatives?
  6. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: Does he stand by his statement last week on Canterbury District Health Board that “I was down there in November announcing the extra $13 million, and that is more than ample to cover the $4 million that Canterbury said was necessary to cover mental health demands”?
  7. NUK KORAKO to the Minister for Building and Housing: What reports has he received on the issues of rock falls, liquefaction, and building performance arising from Sunday’s earthquake in Christchurch, and what implications do these have for the ongoing rebuild work for the city?
  8. RON MARK to the Minister of Police: Is she satisfied with Police numbers in New Zealand?
  9. KELVIN DAVIS to the Minister of Corrections: Why was the Law and Order Committee not told at the Corrections Estimates hearing last year about either the 2009 or 2014 investigations into organised prison violence at Mount Eden Corrections Facility?
  10. Dr KENNEDY GRAHAM to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all of his Government’s policies?
  11. BARBARA KURIGER to the Minister for Primary Industries: What recent reports has he received on growth in beef exports to Taiwan?
  12. Hon DAVID PARKER to the Minister of Foreign Affairs: Who will own the abattoir at the Al Khalaf Agri-hub in the Saudi Arabian desert and how much taxpayer money has been spent on it since further spending was suspended in August 2015?

National: Four questions on the Budget, broadband, Christchurch earthquake and beef exports.

Labour: Four questions on tertiary fees, Canterbury DHB, Mt Eden Prison and the Saudi farm

Greens: Two questions on the economy and standing by policies

NZ First: Two questions on Police numbers and a prison escape

Debate on PM’s Statement 3 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

Of the 13 hour debate there are five hours 47 minutes remaining, or 35 speeches.

Government Bills

It is likely the Government will adjourn the PM’s Statement debate at some stage and progress some bills.

Social Housing Reform (Transaction Mandate Bill) – second reading continued

This bill amends the Housing Corporation Act 1974 to provide designated Ministers with the authority to transfer Housing New Zealand Corporation properties.

  • Introduced July 2015
  • 1st reading: August 2015, passed 63 to 58 with Labour, Greens and NZ First opposed
  • SC report: December 2015, supported with amendments unanimously

The second reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours. There are eight speeces remaining.

Home and Community Support (Payment for Travel Between Clients) Settlement Bill – committee stage

This Bill implements a settlement between the Crown, District Health Boards, providers of home and community-based care and support services, and certain unions on behalf of home and community-based care and support employees.

  • Introduced September 2015
  • 1st reading: October 2015, passed unanimously
  • SC report: December 2015, supported with amendments without dissent
  • 2nd reading: February 2016, passed unanimously

There is no time limit for the committee stage but it is estimated to be a four hour debate as the bill has three parts and preliminary provisions to debate.

 

 

Parliament 11 February 2016

February 11th, 2016 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: Does he stand by his statement that “we’ve slowed the growth of public spending” given growth in health spending has slowed from over 9 percent under Labour to just 2.6 percent over the last five years, and what impact has this had on district health boards?
  2. Dr PARMJEET PARMAR to the Minister of Finance: What is the outlook for the New Zealand economy, and how does this compare with other developed countries?
  3. MARAMA FOX to the Minister responsible for HNZC: What assurances can he give that the remediation work needed on the estimated 57,500 non-compliant houses, as identified in the2014 Trial of Rental Housing Warrant of Fitness Scheme report, will be carried out as a matter of priority?
  4. JAMI-LEE ROSS to the Minister of Transport: What announcements has the Government made recently on the East-West Connection roading project in Auckland?
  5. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: When the Prime Minister said in his Statement to Parliament this week that there is now a $17 billion shortfall from Budget 2015, leading to “slightly higher debt”, exactly how much higher net and gross debt is now forecast, and when will that debt peak?
  6. TIM MACINDOE to the Minister of Tourism: What reports has he seen about the number of tourists that visited New Zealand over the summer season?
  7. METIRIA TUREI to the Minister of Education: Does she agree with the findings of the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment Report that “the socio-economic status of students is probably the most important risk factor associated with low academic performance”?
  8. CLARE CURRAN to the Minister of Broadcasting: Is she satisfied there is no conflict of interest in recent appointments to the board of Radio New Zealand?
  9. MARK MITCHELL to the Minister for Economic Development: What recent announcements has he made about economic development in Northland?
  10. RINO TIRIKATENE to the Minister of Customs: Does she stand by all her answers to Oral Question No. 11 in the House yesterday?
  11. DENIS O’ROURKE to the Associate Minister of Transport: Is he satisfied with the rate and seriousness of accidents involving overseas drivers, in light of the work the Government is doing to target overseas drivers?
  12. STUART SMITH to the Minister for Primary Industries: What recent reports has he received on the growth in wine exports?

National: Five questions on the economy, Auckland roading, tourism, Northland and wine exports.

Labour: Four questions on health spending, government debt, Radio NZ Board, and Minister of Customs standing by her answers

Greens: One question on student achievement

NZ First: One question on overseas drivers

Maori Party: One question on Housing WOFs

Debate on PM’s Statement 3 pm to 6.00 pm

Of the 13 hour debate there are six hours 49 minutes remaining, or 41 speeches.

Government Bills

It is likely the Government will adjourn the PM’s Statement debate at some stage and progress some bills.

Home and Community Support (Payment for Travel Between Clients) Settlement Bill – first reading

This Bill implements a settlement between the Crown, District Health Boards, providers of home and community-based care and support services, and certain unions on behalf of home and community-based care and support employees.

  • Introduced September 2015
  • 1st reading: October 2015, passed unanimously
  • SC report: December 2015, supported unanimously with amendments

The first reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

 

Parliament 10 February 2016

February 10th, 2016 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. JONATHAN YOUNG to the Minister of Finance: What recent reports has he received on employment in New Zealand?
  2. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he have confidence in the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment in light of student loan debt being set to pass $15 billion this year?
  3. JAMI-LEE ROSS to the Minister of Transport: What announcements has the Government made recently setting out its commitment to the City Rail Link project in Auckland?
  4. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he have confidence in the Governor of the Reserve Bank; if so, is he confident that the Policy Targets Agreement he signed with the Governor in 2012 is being fulfilled?
  5. MARK MITCHELL to the Minister of Trade: What progress has been made to advance New Zealand’s trade links with the rest of the world?
  6. METIRIA TUREI to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement to Parliament yesterday that he’s in government to make this country a better place for New Zealanders and their families?
  7. CHRIS HIPKINS to the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment: Is he satisfied with his oversight of the tertiary education sector?
  8. ALFRED NGARO to the Minister for Building and Housing: How does the number of homes consented in the last quarter of 2008 compare with the last quarter of 2015?
  9. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Prime Minister: Does he have confidence in the Hon Steven Joyce; if so, why?
  10. MELISSA LEE to the Minister for Small Business: How will New Zealand small businesses benefit from the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement?
  11. RINO TIRIKATENE to the Minister of Customs: Does she agree with the Prime Minister’s statement that “We will confront the P problem, using the full force of the Government’s arsenal”; if so, why does an experienced Customs officer say that only one in 10 illicit drug imports is being seized at the border?
  12. RICHARD PROSSER to the Minister of Conservation: What was her reasoning behind approving the transfer and release of silver carp near Lake Taupo?

National: Five questions on employment, Auckland City Ral Link, TPPA x 2, and building consents

Labour: Four questions on student debt, inflation, tertiary education sector and P

Greens: One question on PM’s statement

NZ First: Two questions on confidence in Steven Joyce and Lake Taupo

Questions to Members

  1. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Member in charge of the Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill: Why did he draft the Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill?
  2. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Member in charge of the Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill: What problem does the Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill seek to address?
  3. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Member in charge of the Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill: What problem does the Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill seek to address?
  4. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Member in charge of the Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill: What problem does the Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill seek to address?

The MP in charge is Dr Jian Yang. Not sure why Qs 2 to 4 are identical.

Debate on PM’s Statement 3 pm to 5.45 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

Of the 13 hour debate there are nine hours 18 minutes remaining, or 56 speeches.

Maiden Speech 5.45 pm to 6.00 pm

New National List MP Maureen Push will give her maiden speech

Government Bills

It is likely the Government will adjourn the PM’s Statement debate at some stage and progress some bills.

Taxation (Annual Rates for 2015-16, Research and Development, and Remedial Matters) Bill – committee stage continued

The bill is an omnibus bill that significantly amends ten different tax acts,especially in the area of child support.

  • Introduced: February 2015
  • 1st reading: March 2015, passed unanimously
  • SC report: September 2015, supported unanimously with amendments
  • 2nd reading: October 2015, passed unanimously

There is no time limit for the committee stage but it is estimated to be a five hour debate as the bill has four parts and preliminary provisions to debate. Three parts have been agreed to, so there are probably one to two hours remaining.

The Minister has two SOPs.

Weathertight Homes Resolution Services Amendment Bill – committee stage continued

The bill amends the Weathertight Home Resolution Services Act 2006 to remove any doubt about the validity of the criteria, deem certain claims determined as ineligible to be eligible, and to widen the definition of qualifying claimant.

  • Introduced: February 2015
  • 1st reading: March 2015, passed unanimously
  • Select Committee report: July 2015, supported unanimously with amendments
  • 2nd reading: September 2015, passed unanimously

There is no time limit for the committee stage but it is estimated to be a three hour debate as the bill has two parts and preliminary provisions to debate. One part has been agreed to, so there are probably one to two hours remaining.

 

Parliament 9 February 2016

February 9th, 2016 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

The Prime Minister delivers a statement to open the year with. He, and other party leaders (with at least six MPs) get 20 minutes each and all other MPs get 10 minutes.

The debate will last 13 hours which will mean four speeches of 20 minutes and 68 speeches of 10 minutes.

If they do not break for any other business, they will complete. six and a half hours of the debate today.

 

Government once again over-using urgency

December 16th, 2015 at 6:37 am by David Farrar

In their first term the Government constantly used urgency to pass bills quickly, and in some cases to bypass select committee scrutiny.

I worked with Grant Robertson to highlight this, and since 2010 there has been far less use of urgency. This is partly due to a change to standing orders allow for extending sitting hours.

From 2011 to 2013 there were no bills that bypassed select committee and on average there were only 30 hours of urgency a year.

In 2015 the Government seems to have again taken to using urgency frequently, and to bypass select committees.

I’ll compare 2012 with 2015, as both are post-election years. Key stats are:

  • Sitting Hours 549 (2012) and 555 (2015)
  • Urgency Hours 10 and 63
  • Bills Passed 92 and 122
  • Bills bypassing select committee 0 and 10
  • Weeks with an urgency motion 1 and 5

Having ten bills bypass select committee is way too many. Some legitimately were urgent such as fixing a problem with sworn Police officers, but one in 12 bills did not go to a select committee. That is way too many.

I didn’t realise until I got this data (thanks to Trevor Mallard for getting it for me from the Parliamentary Library) how excessive the use of urgency had been in 2015.

In 2016 I’m going to watch this much more closely and highlight whenever urgency is used. It should be rare and a last resort.

One man one vote started 125 years ago

December 10th, 2015 at 2:00 pm by David Farrar

Parliament informs us:

125 years ago on 5 December 1890, the first ‘one man, one vote’ election in New Zealand was held. For the first time people could only vote once – a practice that continues to this day.

Plural voting

Since New Zealand’s very first election in 1853, men who owned or leased property of a certain value could vote in every district in which they qualified. This practice was called plural voting.

It was quite easy to do in early elections because up until 1881 elections in different districts were usually held on different days. The move to a single election day had slowed the practice, but did not stop it.

Representation Act Amendment Act 1889

From 1878 onwards many attempts were made to stop plural voting. In 1889, Governor George Grey moved an amendment to prevent people from voting in more than one district under the Representation Act Amendment Bill. It passed by 55 votes to 18.

Exceptions

The change was not total. Property owners were still allowed to enrol in every electorate in which they qualified (plural registration) even though they were only allowed to vote in one.

This meant that they could vote in by-elections in more than one district during a parliamentary term. There was also a dual vote remaining for Māori property-owners, who could vote in both Māori and European electorates if they fulfilled the property qualification.

Both of these exceptions were abolished in 1893, finally achieving a true ‘one man, one vote’ situation. Later that year this changed again when women were given the vote. This resulted in our current system of “one person, one vote”.

Would be interesting to know when other countries moved to one man one vote and then one person one vote.

Parliament 9 December 2015

December 9th, 2015 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. METIRIA TUREI to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement that “I will lead a Government that will govern for all New Zealanders”?
  2. ALASTAIR SCOTT to the Minister of Finance: What progress has the Government made on its priority of delivering better public services in 2015?
  3. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: What actions, if any, is his Government planning for New Zealanders about to celebrate Christmas who are among the growing number of unemployed, or living in unhealthy rental housing, or trying to buy their own home, or waiting for vital surgery, or needing a life-saving medicine?
  4. ANDREW BAYLY to the Minister for ACC: What recent announcements has the Government made regarding ACC levies?
  5. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: Does he stand by all his statements?
  6. IAN McKELVIE to the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment: How is the Government encouraging young people to study offshore and develop international linkages?
  7. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  8. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by his statement in Budget 2015 that unemployment is expected to fall below 5 percent in 2016, and that economic growth on average will be 2.8 percent over the next four years?
  9. Dr PARMJEET PARMAR to the Minister for Social Development: How does the Child Hardship Package help families on a benefit?
  10. CATHERINE DELAHUNTY to the Minister for the Environment: What specific action will he take to clean up waterways such as Lake Tutira whose algal blooms are so toxic that children have been banned from boating and kayaking there?
  11. STUART SMITH to the Minister for the Environment: What improvements in water quality has the Government achieved from its Fresh Start for Fresh Water budget allocations?
  12. Hon DAVID CUNLIFFE to the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment: Does he agree with the New Zealand Herald report that the “student funding scandal” is “the result of a funding crunch intersecting with a reporting and monitoring system that operates largely on trust”; if not, why not?

National: Five questions on better public services, ACC levies, offshore study, family support and water quality

Labour: Four questions on PM’s actions, Health Ministers statements, unemployment, and student funding scandals

Greens: Two questions on PM’s statements and water quality

NZ First: One question on PM standing by his statements

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 4.30 pm

Statutes Amendment Bill – first reading

This Statutes Amendment Bill consists entirely of amendments to Acts and is therefore an omnibus Bill that may be introduced by virtue of Standing Order 262(1)(f).

  • Introduced: October 2015

The first reading is a debate of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each so a maximum debate of two hours. However it is expected to be a shorter debate.

 

Subordinate Legislation Confirmation Bill – second and third readings

This bill has two closely related purposes: to confirm, or confirm and validate, subordinate legislation that will lapse at a specified time unless it is earlier confirmed, or confirmed and validated, by an Act of Parliament; and to replace with standard provisions in the Legislation Act 2012, but not alter the subordinate legislation covered by, all existing confirmation provisions.

  • Introduced: June 2015
  • 1st reading: July 2015, passed unanimously
  • SC report: November 2015, supported unanimously with amendments

The second and third readings are debates of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each so a maximum debate of two hours each. However it is expected to be a shorter debate.

Adjournment Debate 4.30 pm to 6.00 pm

A resolution to adjourn the House until Tuesday 9 February 2016

A 90 minute debate of 18 speeches of five minutes each.

 

 

 

Parliament 8 December 2015

December 8th, 2015 at 11:44 am by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. KANWALJIT SINGH BAKSHI to the Minister of Finance: What upcoming announcements will the Government deliver on the economic and fiscal outlook?
  2. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he have confidence in all his Ministers?
  3. METIRIA TUREI to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  4. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Minister for State Owned Enterprises: Does he condone the action of KiwiRail in closing bridge 143 over the North Auckland Line, thereby severing the connection between two parts of the property owned by Owen Clements?
  5. ANDREW LITTLE to the Minister of Health: Does he stand by the Prime Minister’s statement in relation to the lack of Pharmac funding for Keytruda that “we’ve got to give health more money”, given his Government has cut health funding in real terms by $1.7 billion?
  6. SIMON O’CONNOR to the Minister for Social Housing: What recent announcements has she made about community housing providers increasing social housing supply in Auckland?
  7. KELVIN DAVIS to the Minister of Corrections: Does he agree with former Minister of Corrections Judith Collins that “Serco has a strong track record in manging prisons. I’m confident that the company will bring the high standards of professionalism, safety, rehabilitation and security expected by the Government to Mt Eden”?
  8. MARAMA DAVIDSON to the Minister for Climate Change Issues: Will New Zealand join Canada, Australia, Tuvalu and the 43 other low-lying islands, and support the inclusion of a goal to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees in the Paris climate agreement; if not, why not?
  9. STUART NASH to the Minister of Police: Does he have concerns that the Police’s planned new Human Resources Management Information System has been classified by Treasury as having “major risks or issues apparent in a number of key areas”?
  10. SCOTT SIMPSON to the Minister of Education: What recent announcement has she made on driver licences in schools?
  11. POTO WILLIAMS to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement “you back the rapists” during question time on 10 November 2015?
  12. ALFRED NGARO to the Minister of Justice: What new projects has she asked the Law Commission to begin in 2016?

National: Four questions on the economy, social housing, driver licenses and Law Commission projects

Labour: Five questions on PM confidenc in Ministers, Keytruda, Serco, Police and PM’s statement on backing rapists

Greens: Two questions on PM standing by his statements and climate change

NZ First: One question on Kiwirail

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

New Zealand Public Health and Disability (Southern DHB) Elections Bill – first reading

http://www.parliament.nz/en-nz/pb/legislation/bills/00DBHOH_BILL67988_1/new-zealand-public-health-and-disability-southern-dhb

  • Introduced: December 2015

The first reading is a debate of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each so a maximum debate of two hours

Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill – first reading

http://www.parliament.nz/en-nz/pb/legislation/bills/00DBHOH_BILL67988_1/new-zealand-public-health-and-disability-southern-dhb

  • Introduced: December 2015

The first reading is a debate of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each so a maximum debate of two hours

Taxation (Residential Land Withholding Tax, GST on Online Services, and Student Loans) Bill – first reading

http://www.parliament.nz/en-nz/pb/legislation/bills/00DBHOH_BILL67988_1/new-zealand-public-health-and-disability-southern-dhb

  • Introduced: November 2015

The first reading is a debate of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each so a maximum debate of two hours

 

 

Four new members’ bills

December 4th, 2015 at 10:00 am by David Farrar

The four drawn from the ballot were:

Customs and Excise (Prohibition of Imports Made by Slave Labour) Amendment Bill

This bill by Labour MP Peeni Henare bans the import of products made by slave labour.

There may be issues around how you define that, but should definitely go to select committee.

Public Works (Prohibition of Compulsory Acquisition of Māori Land) Amendment Bill

This bill by Green MP Catherine Delahunty amend the Public Works Act 1981 to protect Māori freehold and Māori customary land from being acquired by a Minister or local authority for public works. This would mean that no Māori land can be taken without consent.

I can’t see why Maori landowners would have special legal rights not available to other landowners. I’d vote against this.

Consumer Guarantees (Removal of Unrelated Party Lender Responsibility) Amendment Bill

This bill by National MP Shane Reti amends the Consumer Guarantees Act’s definition of supplier in the Act to exclude a lender who is an unrelated party from the definition of a supplier.

Looks technical and boring but worthy.

Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Exemption for RNZRSA Clubs from Special Licencing Requirements for Anzac Day) Amendment Bill

This bill by National MP Paul Foster-Bell  amends the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 to exempt those RNZRSA clubs that hold a current general liquor licence from having to seek an additional special licence to enable them to serve liquor before 1pm on Anzac Day.

Looks excellent. Ridiculous to make RSAs pay $500 for a special licence to be able to serve on ANZAC Day.

Which bills made first reading last night

December 3rd, 2015 at 11:00 am by David Farrar
  • Affordable Healthcare Bill (Winston Peters) defeated 46 to 75. Labour and NZ First in favour. Amazing that Labour claims it is committed to surpluses and votes for a massively expensive bill.
  • Education (Restoration of Democracy to University Councils) Amendment Bill (David Cunliffe) defeated 60 to 61. Labour, Greens and NZ First in favour
  • Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill (Jian Yang) passed. Labour and Greens against
  • Electricity Transparency Bill (David Shearer) – defeated 60 to 61. Labour, Greens and NZ First in favour
  • Commerce (Supermarket Adjudicator and Code of Conduct) Amendment Bill (Mojo Mathers) – defeated 60 to 61. Labour, Greens and NZ First in favour

Members’ bills ballot, Thursday 3 December 2015

December 3rd, 2015 at 10:00 am by David Farrar

Another giant ballot today.

A ballot to select five Members’ bills for introduction will take place at noon tomorrow.

Proposed members’ bills may be viewed here. Recently lodged bills may not yet be available.

A list of bills currently entered (as of last night) in the ballot is shown below.

  Bill Title Member Name
1 Accident Compensation (Recent Migrants and Returning New Zealanders) Amendment Bill Melissa Lee
2 Age of Majority (Attainment at 18 Years) Amendment Bill Brett Hudson
3 Arbitration Amendment Bill Tim Macindoe
4 Better Public Service Target Results Independent Audit Bill Darroch Ball
5 Broadcasting (Games of National Significance) Amendment Bill Clayton Mitchell
6 Burial and Cremation (Removal of Audit Requirement for Cemetery Trusts) Amendment Bill Hon Clayton Cosgrove
7 Buy New Zealand (Procurement) Bill Barbara Stewart
8 Celebrant Eligibility Expansion Bill Chris Bishop
9 Charter Schools (Application of Official Information and Ombudsmen Acts) Bill Hon Nanaia Mahuta
10 Child Poverty Reduction and Eradication Bill Jacinda Ardern
11 Children, Young Persons, and Their Families (Parent’s and Guardian’s Responsibility) Amendment Bill Barbara Kuriger
12 Companies (Annual Report Notice Requirements) Amendment Bill Matt Doocey
13 Consumer Guarantees (Removal of Unrelated Party Lender Responsibility) Amendment Bill Dr Shane Reti
14 Copyright (Parody and Satire) Amendment Bill Gareth Hughes
15 Credit Contracts and Consumer Finance (Break Fees Disclosure) Amendment Bill Simon O’Connor
16 Credit Reforms (Responsible Lending) Bill Kris Faafoi
17 Crimes (Corporate Manslaughter) Amendment Bill Hon Damien O’Connor
18 Crimes (Covert Intimate Filming of Incapacitated Persons) Amendment Bill Tracey Martin
19 Crimes (Increased Penalty for Providing Explosive to Commit Crime) Amendment Bill Todd Muller
20 Crimes (Non-fatal Strangulation) Amendment Bill Kelvin Davis
21 Criminal Procedure (Removing Paedophile Name Suppression) Amendment Bill Pita Paraone
22 Crown Minerals (Homes and Residences Exemption) Amendment Bill Eugenie Sage
23 Crown Minerals (Protection of World Heritage Sites) Amendment Bill Hon Ruth Dyson
24 Customs and Excise (Prohibition of Imports Made by Slave Labour) Amendment Bill Peeni Henare
25 Domestic Violence—Victims’ Protection Bill Jan Logie
26 Education (Charter Schools Abolition) Amendment Bill Chris Hipkins
27 Education (Charter Schools Teacher Quality) Amendment Bill Hon Phil Goff
28 Education (Public Good not Profit from Charter Schools) Amendment Bill Dr David Clark
29 Electricity Industry (Energy Efficiency) Amendment Bill Rino Tirikatene
30 Employment Relations (Allowing Higher Earners to Contract Out of Personal Grievance Provisions) Amendment Bill Scott Simpson
31 Employment Relations (Certainty at Work) Amendment Bill Iain Lees-Galloway
32 Employment Relations (Restoring Kiwis’ Right to a Break at Work) Amendment Bill Sue Moroney
33 Employment Relations (Triangular Employment) Amendment Bill Stuart Nash
34 End of Life Choice Bill David Seymour
35 Environment Canterbury (Democracy Restoration) Amendment Bill Dr Megan Woods
36 Equal Pay Amendment Bill Marama Davidson
37 Family Proceedings (Paternity Tests and Parentage Orders) Amendment Bill Sarah Dowie
38 Housing Restructuring and Tenancy Matters (Assured Tenancies) Amendment Bill Jenny Salesa
39 Human Rights (Disability Assist Dogs Non-Discrimination) Amendment Bill Mojo Mathers
40 Immigration (Refugee Quota) Amendment Bill Denise Roche
41 Income Tax (Clean Transport FBT Exclusions) Amendment Bill Julie Anne Genter
42 Independent Prison Inspectorate Bill David Clendon
43 International Non-Aggression and Lawful Use of Force (Implementation of Amendment to Statute of Rome) Bill Dr Kennedy Graham
44 International Transparent Treaties Bill Fletcher Tabuteau
45 Kirpan Authorisation Bill Kanwaljit Singh Bakshi
46 Land Transfer (Foreign Ownership of Land Register) Amendment Bill Mahesh Bindra
47 Land Transport (Tourist Driver Rental Vehicle) Amendment Bill Denis O’Rourke
48 Land Transport (Wheel Clamping Protection) Amendment Bill Phil Twyford
49 Lawyers and Conveyancers (Protection of Community Law Centre Funding) Amendment Bill Carmel Sepuloni
50 Legislation (Climate Impact Disclosure Statement) Amendment Bill James Shaw
51 Life Jackets for Children and Young Persons Bill Alfred Ngaro
52 Litter (Increased Infringement Fee) Amendment Bill Jono Naylor
53 Local Government (Customer Focus) Amendment Bill Jacqui Dean
54 Local Government (Four Well-beings) Amendment Bill Su’a William Sio
55 Local Government (Freedom of Access) Amendment Bill Jonathan Young
56 Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill Joanne Hayes
57 Meat Industry Restructuring Bill Richard Prosser
58 Military Decorations and Distinctive Badges (Modernisation) Amendment Bill Todd Barclay
59 New Zealand Public Health and Disability (Child Health Obesity Target) Amendment Bill Hon Annette King
60 Oaths and Declarations (Members of Parliament) Amendment Bill Meka Whaitiri
61 Ombudsmen (Cost Recovery) Amendment Bill Hon David Parker
62 Our Work Our Future Bill Andrew Little
63 Private International Law (Choice of Law in Tort) Bill David Bennett
64 Public Finance (Sustainable Development Indicators) Amendment Bill Steffan Browning
65 Public Works (Prohibition of Compulsory Acquisition of Māori Land) Amendment Bill Catherine Delahunty
66 Radio New Zealand (Catch-up Funding) Amendment Bill Clare Curran
67 Radiocommunications (Enhanced Public Broadcasting Provision) Amendment Bill Adrian Rurawhe
68 Receiverships (Agricultural Debt Mediation) Amendment Bill Ron Mark
69 Residential Tenancies (Warm, Safe, and Secure Rentals) Amendment Bill Metiria Turei
70 Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Exemption for RNZRSA Clubs from Special Licencing Requirements for Anzac Day) Amendment Bill Paul Foster-Bell
71 Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Renewal of Licences) Amendment Bill Louisa Wall
72 Sentencing (Domestic Violence) Amendment Bill Poto Williams
73 Sentencing (Livestock Rustling) Amendment Bill Ian McKelvie
74 Shop Trading Hours Act Repeal (Shopping Centre Opening Hours) Amendment Bill Hon Trevor Mallard
75 Social Security (Apprenticeship Assistance for Youth) Amendment Bill Grant Robertson
76 Summary Offences (Increased Penalty for Seeking Donations by False Pretence) Amendment Bill Nuk Korako
77 Vulnerable Children (Mandatory Social Worker Registration) Amendment Bill Ria Bond
78 Waitemata Harbour Protection Bill Rt Hon Winston Peters
79 Wildlife (Threatened Species Protection) Amendment Bill Kevin Hague

The bills by party (Ministers excluded) are:

  • National – 22/34
  • Labour – 30/32
  • Greens – 14/14
  • NZ First -12/12
  • Maori – 0/1
  • ACT – 1/1
  • Total – 79/94

Parliament 2 December 2015

December 2nd, 2015 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. RON MARK to the Minister of Immigration: Is he aware of agents in India blatantly promoting student visas in New Zealand as a pathway to residence?
  2. JACQUI DEAN to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by his statement that one of the Government’s key priorities “is to deliver better public services”; if so, what steps is the Government taking to help achieve this?
  3. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he have confidence in his Minister for Economic Development, given that the economy is shrinking on a per person basis?
  4. JOANNE HAYES to the Minister for Economic Development:What is the Government doing to encourage investment, jobs and growth in regions like the West Coast?
  5. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: What recent reports has he received on access to affordable pharmaceuticals for New Zealanders?
  6. METIRIA TUREI to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement that “It makes no sense to be calling for emissions reductions on one hand, while subsidising emissions on the other”?
  7. MELISSA LEE to the Associate Minister of Education: What recent announcements have been made regarding the Government’s investment in education infrastructure?
  8. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister for Canterbury Earthquake Recovery: Does he agree with the Treasury assessment of the anchor projects in Christchurch that “it is highly likely that additional funding will be needed to finish the programme” and that “this means increasing funding would require significant compromise of other investment initiatives”?
  9. IAN McKELVIE to the Minister of Police: How is the Police using new technology to help victims of family violence in New Zealand?
  10. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Minister for the Environment: Does he stand by all his statements?
  11. STUART NASH to the Minister of Police: Does he think that a 47.6 percent resolution rate for reported sexual assault crimes is acceptable; if so, why?
  12. TODD BARCLAY to the Minister of Transport: What progress has the Government made on its commitment to replace the Kawarau Falls Bridge in Queenstown?

National: Five questions on better public services, West Coast, education infrastructure, family violence and Queenstown.

Labour: Four questions on economic development, pharmaceuticals, Christchurch and sexual assault crimes

Greens: One question on climate change

NZ First: Two questions on student visas and Environment Minister standing by his statements

General Debate 3.00 pm to 4.00 pm

The general debate is 12 speeches of up to five minutes each for a debate of an hour.

Members’ Bills 4.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

Affordable Healthcare Bill – first reading continued

The bill’s purpose is to encourage people to contribute to their own healthcare costs in a way that is consistent with supporting the public health system. It also makes health insurance a requirement for Parent Category visa applications. It proposes to require Parent Category migrants to have health insurance on arrival and to maintain it in New Zealand for 10 years; remove fringe benefit tax from health insurance; and introduce the SuperGold health insurance premium rebate.. It is in the name of NZ First MP Winston Peters.

  • Introduced: August 2015

The first reading consists of 11 speeches, with two speeches of up to 10 minutes nine other speeches (including a right of reply) have up to five minutes each each so the debate is a maximum of 65 minutes. There is one speech remaining.

Education (Restoration of Democracy to University Councils) Amendment Bill – first reading

This bill would repeal recent amendments to the Education Act 1989 removing the requirement for democratic elections and student representatives on Tertiary Institution Councils, and ensures students are represented in the governing of their tertiary institutions by democratically elected representatives. It is in the name of Labour MP David Cunliffe.

  • Introduced: October 2015

The first reading consists of 11 speeches, with two speeches of up to 10 minutes nine other speeches (including a right of reply) have up to five minutes each each so the debate is a maximum of 65 minutes.

Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill – first reading

The purpose of this bill is to protect vulnerable members of society from child sex offenders by preventing those individuals convicted of a child sex offence from changing their name. It is in the name of National MP Dr Jian Yang

  • Introduced: October 2015

The first reading consists of 11 speeches, with two speeches of up to 10 minutes nine other speeches (including a right of reply) have up to five minutes each each so the debate is a maximum of 65 minutes.

Electricity Transparency Bill – first reading

This Bill amends the Electricity Industry Act 2010 to require that every electricity bill sent to domestic consumers includes a list itemising and attaching a percentage to the different components comprising the bill. It is in the name of Labour MP David Shearer.

  • Introduced: October 2015

The first reading consists of 11 speeches, with two speeches of up to 10 minutes nine other speeches (including a right of reply) have up to five minutes each each so the debate is a maximum of 65 minutes.

Commerce (Supermarket Adjudicator and Code of Conduct) Amendment Bill – first reading

This bill amends the Commerce Act 1986 to require that a supermarket adjudicator is established, to resolve disputes between supermarkets and suppliers. It is in the name of Green MP Mojo Mathers.

  • Introduced: October 2015

The first reading consists of 11 speeches, with two speeches of up to 10 minutes nine other speeches (including a right of reply) have up to five minutes each each so the debate is a maximum of 65 minutes.

Oaths and Declarations (Endorsing the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi) Amendment Bill – first reading

The purpose of this bill is to ensure that a person taking any oath set out in statute may, in addition to the words of the oath, elect to state that they will perform their duties in accordance with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi. It is in the name of Maori Party MP Marama Fox.

  • Introduced: November 2015

The first reading consists of 11 speeches, with two speeches of up to 10 minutes nine other speeches (including a right of reply) have up to five minutes each each so the debate is a maximum of 65 minutes.

Parliament 1 December 2015

December 1st, 2015 at 11:45 am by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. MARK MITCHELL to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received showing a recent lift in business confidence supports an outlook for continuing moderate growth and a more diversified economy?
  2. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement that New Zealand “shouldn’t be a leader in climate change”, given that New Zealand was awarded the “Fossil of the Day award” following his speech on the first day of the Paris climate talks?
  3. Dr SHANE RETI to the Minister of Health: Can he confirm that as at September 2015 99.31 percent of patients waiting for elective surgery received their treatment within four months?
  4. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he agree with the Minister for Canterbury Earthquake Recovery that Treasury has an “arrogant bureaucratic attitude” to Christchurch and that the report he released yesterday is “utter tripe”; if not, why not?
  5. METIRIA TUREI to the Minister of Revenue: What has been the overall impact of tax deductions for petroleum and mining expenditures on the level of oil and gas exploration and prospecting in New Zealand since 2012/13, and how much revenue has the Government forgone as a result of these tax deductions in this period?
  6. SARAH DOWIE to the Minister of Education: What announcements has she made recently on trades academies?
  7. CHRIS HIPKINS to the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment: Is he satisfied with the oversight he and his officials have of spending on tertiary education programmes?
  8. JAMI-LEE ROSS to the Minister for Building and Housing: Can he confirm that the number of building consents issued for homes in Auckland in October 2015 was 805 as compared with 205 in October 2008, and that the yearly total is the highest in 11 years?
  9. FLETCHER TABUTEAU to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by all his statements?
  10. Hon DAMIEN O’CONNOR to the Minister for Food Safety: Is she satisfied by all the advice she has received from the Ministry of Primary Industries on food safety?
  11. DAVID BENNETT to the Minister of Customs: How will the Government’s investment in new SmartGate border processing technology make travel easier for passengers this Christmas?
  12. MOJO MATHERS to the Minister for Primary Industries: What percentage of complaints made to the Ministry for Primary Industries about animal cruelty result in prosecutions?

National: Five questions on business confidence, elective surgery, trades academies, building consents and SmartGate

Labour: Four questions on climate change, Treasury, tertiary education and food safety

Greens: Two questions mining tax deductions and animal cruelty

NZ First: One question on Finance Minister standing by his statement

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

Support for Children in Hardship Bill – committee stage continued

This Bill is an omnibus Bill introduced under Standing Order 263(a). The Bill strengthens work expectations and increases assistance for parents on a benefit and who have dependent children from 1 April 2016.

  • Introduced: May 2015
  • 1st reading: May 2015, passed 109 to 12 with NZ First opposed
  • Select Committee report: October 2015, supported by majority with amendments with minority reports from Labour, Greens and NZ First
  • 2nd reading: November 2015, passed unanimously

There is no time limit for the committee stage but it is estimated to be a four hour debate as the bill has three parts and preliminary provisions to debate. One part has been partially debated, so there are probably three to four hours remaining.

Taxation (Annual Rates for 2015-16, Research and Development, and Remedial Matters) Bill – committee stage continued

The bill is an omnibus bill that significantly amends ten different tax acts,especially in the area of child support.

  • Introduced: February 2015
  • 1st reading: March 2015, passed unanimously
  • SC report: September 2015, supported unanimously with amendments
  • 2nd reading: October 2015, passed unanimously

There is no time limit for the committee stage but it is estimated to be a five hour debate as the bill has four parts and preliminary provisions to debate. Two parts have been agreed to, so there are probably two to three hours remaining.

The Minister has two SOPs.

Radio New Zealand Amendment Bill – committee stage continued

The bill amends the Radio New Zealand Act 1995 to implement a new Radio New Zealand Charter

  • Introduced: June 2009
  • 1st reading: June 2009, passed unanimously
  • SC report: December 2009, supported without amendments with a minority report from Labour
  • 2nd reading: May 2015, passed unanimously

There is no time limit for the committee stage but it is estimated to be a one hour debate as the bill will be voted on as one question.

The Minister has one SOP.

 

Weathertight Homes Resolution Services Amendment Bill – committee stage continued

The bill amends the Weathertight Home Resolution Services Act 2006 to remove any doubt about the validity of the criteria, deem certain claims determined as ineligible to be eligible, and to widen the definition of qualifying claimant.

  • Introduced: February 2015
  • 1st reading: March 2015, passed unanimously
  • Select Committee report: July 2015, supported unanimously with amendments
  • 2nd reading: September 2015, passed unanimously

There is no time limit for the committee stage but it is estimated to be a three hour debate as the bill has two parts and preliminary provisions to debate. One part has been debated, so there are probably one to two hours remaining.

 

Parliament 19 November 2015

November 19th, 2015 at 11:51 am by David Farrar

The House is still in urgency today debating and voting on three bills through all stages.

They are:

The House will sit from 9 am to midnight with one hour breaks at 1 pm and 6 pm. Normally there is no question time under urgency, but the Government sought leave for question time to still occur.

It is likely the House will finish with the third bill this afternoon.

The questions are:

  1. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: What pressures are facing the public health workforce as a result of this Government’s decision to fund core Crown health expenditure to cover “most, but not all, inflationary pressures”?
  2. SARAH DOWIE to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by his statement that the Government is focused “on reinforcing the business confidence needed to invest, create more jobs and increase incomes”?
  3. RON MARK to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  4. EUGENIE SAGE to the Minister for the Environment: Has he given clear national direction to local authorities to help them protect coastal communities from rising sea levels; if not, why not?
  5. PAUL FOSTER-BELL to the Minister of Education: What recent announcements has she made regarding property investment in schools?
  6. CHRIS HIPKINS to the Minister of Education: Is she satisfied the Government has fulfilled its 2008 commitment to tackle truancy; if so, why is the truancy rate now higher than it has ever been?
  7. ALASTAIR SCOTT to the Deputy Prime Minister: What steps is the Government taking to allow New Zealanders to choose our future flag?
  8. DAVID SEYMOUR to the Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations: Does he stand by all his statements?
  9. KELVIN DAVIS to the Minister of Police: By what percentage has the crime resolution rate decreased overall since 2008?
  10. BRETT HUDSON to the Minister for Communications: What is the current status of the build programme for Ultra-Fast Broadband and the Rural Broadband Initiative?
  11. MARAMA DAVIDSON to the Minister for Climate Change Issues: What plans does New Zealand have to help our Pacific Island neighbours given that the Prime Minister of Tuvalu, Enele Sopoaga, has recently appealed to New Zealand to “stand with us Pacific Islands countries and increase their commitments”?
  12. KRIS FAAFOI to the Minister for Building and Housing: Is he confident that all taxpayers’ money allocated for his HomeStart roadshow is being spent appropriately?

National: Four questions on business confidence, school property, NZ Flag and broadband

Labour: Four questions on health spending, truancy, crime and Homestart Roadshow

Greens: Two questions on sea levels and climate change

NZ First: One question on PM standing by his statements

ACT: One question on Treaty Minister standing by his statements

Parliament 18 November 2015

November 18th, 2015 at 11:55 am by David Farrar

The House is in urgency today debating and voting on three bills through all stages.

They are:

The House will sit from 9 am to midnight with one hour breaks at 1 pm and 6 pm. Normally there is no question time under urgency, but the Government sought leave for question time to still occur.

Each bill if fully debated will have six hours of debates for the main reading plus committee stages which I estimate could take seven hours, so the total time could be up to 23 hours. But as some are not overly controversial, it should be shorter.

The questions are:

  1. JAMES SHAW to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by all his answers to Oral Question No. 5 yesterday?
  2. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he have confidence in all of his Ministers?
  3. JONATHAN YOUNG to the Minister of Finance: What proportion of the economy is made up by the services sector, and how can the Government boost the productivity of this sector?
  4. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by all his statements?
  5. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister for Primary Industries:Does he agree with the advice of the Prime Minister in regard to dairy prices made in November last year when the average price at the global dairy auction was US$2,561 a tonne for farmers not to get too worried, and that the price would bottom out soon and start climbing again; if so, can he advise what is the latest average price at the global dairy auction?
  6. Dr JIAN YANG to the Minister of Education: What progress has been made on the Investing in Educational Success initiative?
  7. JULIE ANNE GENTER to the Minister of Transport: Does he agree with the Secretary of the Treasury that “there could very well be some merit” in evaluating and funding rail infrastructure on the same basis as state highways and other transport infrastructure?
  8. PHIL TWYFORD to the Minister for Social Housing: Is she embarrassed that families are living in cars?
  9. JOANNE HAYES to the Minister of Conservation (Acting): What are the benefits of the Pike29 Great Walk, and the extension of the Paparoa National Park that takes effect today?
  10. Hon DAVID PARKER to the Minister for Economic Development: Does the withheld NZTE-funded report on why most of the lambs died on the taxpayer-funded farm in the Saudi desert confirm or disprove the statement by Hon Nathan Guy on 18 June 2015 that he thought the lambs could have died in a sand storm?
  11. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Deputy Prime Minister: Is he confident that the money spent on the Flag Referendum is appropriate and lawful?
  12. IAN McKELVIE to the Minister for Food Safety: What initiatives has the Government put in place to encourage the food and beverage industry to reduce the sugar content of their products?

National: Four questions on the economy, education, the Pike29 Great Walk and sugar in food

Labour: Four questions on PM having confidence in Ministers, dairy prices, families living in cars and the Saudi farm

Greens: Two questions on Minister of Finance standing by his statement and transport funding

NZ First: Two questions on Finance Minister standing by his statements and the flag referenda

Parliament 17 November 2015

November 17th, 2015 at 12:00 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. NUK KORAKO to the Minister of Finance: What steps is the Government taking to support a more diverse and resilient New Zealand economy?
  2. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by all his statements?
  3. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: What is the impact on patients and staff of not covering all inflationary pressures in health?
  4. Dr SHANE RETI to the Minister of Health: Can he confirm that elective orthopaedic surgical discharges have increased by 34 percent, from 18,240 in 2008 to 24,439 operations this year?
  5. JAMES SHAW to the Minister of Finance: What advice, if any, has he received from Treasury in the last 18 months on the importance for New Zealand businesses of certainty about long-term policy settings?
  6. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by his statement that “the Government would not be chasing around the unemployment numbers, 3 months to 3 months. We take a longer-term point of view because that is the realistic one”; if so, how many quarters in a row has unemployment risen?
  7. CHRIS BISHOP to the Minister of Revenue: What progress has been made on the Government’s investment property tax reforms announced as part of Budget 2015?
  8. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Minister of Health: Does he stand by all his statements?
  9. CHRIS HIPKINS to the Minister of Education: Does she have confidence that she is receiving quality independent advice from her officials?
  10. DENISE ROCHE to the Minister for Climate Change Issues: Did New Zealand oppose Australia’s effort to try and remove the “climate change displacement coordination facility”, which would have created a body to help people escaping the effects of climate change, from the draft text of the UN climate agreement?
  11. MELISSA LEE to the Minister for Small Business: What Government resources are available to help small businesses keep themselves safe online?
  12. JACINDA ARDERN to the Minister of Justice: On what date did she or her department instruct the Parliamentary Counsel Office to begin drafting the legislation to create a supervision regime for deported offenders that will be debated today?

National: Four questions on the economy, elective surgery, property tax reforms and cybersafety

Labour: Four questions on health funding, unemployment, education advce and Australian deportees

Greens: Two questions on Treasury advice and climate change

NZ First: Two questions on Finance and Health Ministers standing by their statements

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

Support for Children in Hardship Bill – committee stage continued

This Bill is an omnibus Bill introduced under Standing Order 263(a). The Bill strengthens work expectations and increases assistance for parents on a benefit and who have dependent children from 1 April 2016.

  • Introduced: May 2015
  • 1st reading: May 2015, passed 109 to 12 with NZ First opposed
  • Select Committee report: October 2015, supported by majority with amendments with minority reports from Labour, Greens and NZ First
  • 2nd reading: November 2015, passed unanimously

There is no time limit for the committee stage but it is estimated to be a four hour debate as the bill has three parts and preliminary provisions to debate. One part has been partially debated, so there are probably three to four hours remaining.

Weathertight Homes Resolution Services Amendment Bill – committee stage continued

The bill amends the Weathertight Home Resolution Services Act 2006 to remove any doubt about the validity of the criteria, deem certain claims determined as ineligible to be eligible, and to widen the definition of qualifying claimant.

  • Introduced: February 2015
  • 1st reading: March 2015, passed unanimously
  • Select Committee report: July 2015, supported unanimously with amendments
  • 2nd reading: September 2015, passed unanimously

There is no time limit for the committee stage but it is estimated to be a three hour debate as the bill has two parts and preliminary provisions to debate. One part has been debated, so there are probably one to two hours remaining.

 

 

New members’ bills

November 12th, 2015 at 2:00 pm by David Farrar

The four bills selected for first reading are:

Commerce (Supermarket Adjudicator and Code of Conduct) Amendment Bill – Mojo Mathers

This Bill amends the Commerce Act 1986 to require that a supermarket adjudicator is established, to resolve disputes between supermarkets and suppliers. The adjudicator will be funded by a levy of supermarkets and suppliers and will have power to involve the Commerce Commission when required.

You don’t need a government appointed regulator to solve commercial disputes between supermarkets and suppliers, let alone one funded by a compulsory levy on them. We already have the Commerce Act.

Yes Countdown was a bit of a bully with some of its suppliers, and they suffered a media backlash and have lost market share as a result, and also quite a few suppliers.  I would vote against.

Overseas Investment (Protection of New Zealand Homebuyers) Amendment Bill – Phil Twyford

Under the provisions of this Bill, non-residents will be granted permission to purchase a residential property only if they intend to live here permanently or their purchase adds to our existing housing stock.

Would also vote against this bill.  The impact on house prices of foreign buyers is relatively minor compared to land supply issues. And it may also breach CER with Australia.

Oaths and Declarations (Endorsing the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi) Amendment Bill – Marama Fox

The purpose of this bill is to ensure that a person taking any oath set out in statute may, in addition to the words of the oath, elect to state that they will perform their duties in accordance with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi. This recognises that the Treaty of Waitangi is New Zealand’s founding document and the Government is committed to fulfilling its obligations as a Treaty partner.

I’m against as the principles of the Treaty are not well defined, and people may them use such an oath to justify breaking the law by saying they are required to by their oath. Also it is not for people to act in accordance with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi – but for the Government as a whole.

Social Security (Stopping Benefit Payments for Offenders who Repeatedly Fail to Comply with Community Sentences) Amendment Bill – Mark Mitchell

This bill would give the Department of Corrections the power to issue warnings to persons who have not complied with community-based sentences, with the consequence of withholding benefit payments.

Sounds reasonable. There may be some fish-hooks in it, but worth considering at select committee.

Parliament 12 November 2015

November 12th, 2015 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by his statement made on the day Statistics New Zealand reported that 151,000 people were unemployed that “the Government did not intend to do anything specific to tackle rising unemployment”?
  2. BARBARA KURIGER to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received on the stability of New Zealand’s financial system?
  3. METIRIA TUREI to the Minister of Justice: Does she believe proposed laws dealing with deportees, including those from Christmas Island, will sufficiently uphold the rights of New Zealanders?
  4. CHRIS HIPKINS to the Minister of Education: Why has funding for the Early Intervention Service declined since 2010 when the Ministry has reported that demand for the service is rising and its ability to respond to referrals on time is declining?
  5. SIMON O’CONNOR to the Minister of Health: How will the new high-profile public awareness campaign starting today encourage people to make healthy lifestyle changes to tackle obesity?
  6. TRACEY MARTIN to the Minister of Police: Does he stand by all his statements?
  7. KELVIN DAVIS to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  8. SCOTT SIMPSON to the Associate Minister of Tourism: What contribution is tourism making to diversify the New Zealand economy?
  9. MARAMA FOX to the Minister of Health: What is he doing to ensure vital services to promote the understanding and management of asthma and respiratory conditions amongst Māori are maintained given that funding to the only Māori Asthma Society in New Zealand will be discounted at the end of 2015?
  10. ANDREW BAYLY to the Minister of Revenue: What recent announcements has he made on how the Government is making tax simpler?
  11. JACINDA ARDERN to the Minister for Social Development: Does she stand by her statement, when asked whether child poverty was too high in New Zealand, that “it is very difficult to use one measure to determine poverty and hardship”?
  12. RON MARK to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by all of his answers to Oral Question No. 1 on 11 November 2015?

National: Four questions on financial system stability,obesity, tourism and tax simplification

Labour: Four questions on unemployment, education, PM standing by his statements and child poverty

Greens: One question on Australian detainees

NZ First: Two questions on Police Minister and Finance Minister standing by their statements

Maori Party: One question on asthma

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm

International Finance Agreements Amendment Bill – third reading

The Bill amends the International Finance Agreements Act 1961 in order to enable the Government to become a member of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank.

  • Introduced September 2015
  • 1st reading: September 2015, passed 63 to 58 with Labour, Greens and NZ First opposed
  • Select Committee report: October 2015, supported unanimously with amendments
  • 2nd reading: November 2015, passed 109 to 12 with NZ First opposed
  • Committee of the whole House: November 2015, passed 109 to 12 with NZ First opposed

The third reading consists of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each for a maximum debate of two hours.

Taxation (Bright-line Test for Residential Land) Bill – third reading

This Bill introduces amendments to the Income Tax Act 2007 and the Tax Administration Act 1994 so that residential land (except a main home) sold within two years of acquisition is automatically deemed a capital gain and taxed.

  • Introduced: August 2015
  • 1st reading: September 2015, passed 63 to 58 with Labour, Greens and NZ First opposed
  • Select Committee report: October 2015, supported with amendments by the majority with minority reports from Labour, Greens and NZ First
  • 2nd reading: November 2015, passed 109 to 12 with NZ First opposed
  • Committee of the whole House: November 2015, passed 109 to 12 with NZ First opposed

The third reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

 

Members’ bills ballot 12 November 2015

November 12th, 2015 at 11:30 am by David Farrar

A Members’ bill ballot will be held at noon today. Four bills will be drawn.

Proposed members’ bills may be viewed here. Recently lodged bills may not yet be available.

The bills entered in the ballot are listed below.

Bill Title Member Name
1 Accident Compensation (Recent Migrants and Returning New Zealanders) Amendment Bill Melissa Lee
2 Age of Majority (Attainment at 18 Years) Amendment Bill Brett Hudson
3 Arbitration Amendment Bill Tim Macindoe
4 Better Public Service Target Results Independent Audit Bill Darroch Ball
5 Broadcasting (Games of National Significance) Amendment Bill Clayton Mitchell
6 Buy New Zealand (Procurement) Bill Barbara Stewart
7 Celebrant Eligibility Expansion Bill Chris Bishop
8 Charter Schools (Application of Official Information and Ombudsmen Acts) Bill Hon Nanaia Mahuta
9 Child Poverty Reduction and Eradication Bill Jacinda Ardern
10 Children, Young Persons, and Their Families (Parent’s and Guardian’s Responsibility) Amendment Bill Barbara Kuriger
11 Commerce (Supermarket Adjudicator and Code of Conduct) Amendment Bill Mojo Mathers
12 Companies (Annual Report Notice Requirements) Amendment Bill Matt Doocey
13 Consumer Guarantees (Removal of Unrelated Party Lender Responsibility) Amendment Bill Dr Shane Reti
14 Copyright (Parody and Satire) Amendment Bill Gareth Hughes
15 Credit Contracts and Consumer Finance (Break Fees Disclosure) Amendment Bill Simon O’Connor
16 Credit Reforms (Responsible Lending) Bill Kris Faafoi
17 Crimes (Corporate Manslaughter) Amendment Bill Hon Damien O’Connor
18 Crimes (Increased Penalty for Providing Explosive to Commit Crime) Amendment Bill Todd Muller
19 Crimes (Non-fatal Strangulation) Amendment Bill Kelvin Davis
20 Criminal Procedure (Removing Paedophile Name Suppression) Amendment Bill Pita Paraone
21 Crown Minerals (Homes and Residences Exemption) Amendment Bill Eugenie Sage
22 Crown Minerals (Protection of World Heritage Sites) Amendment Bill Hon Ruth Dyson
23 Customs and Excise (Prohibition of Imports Made by Slave Labour) Amendment Bill Peeni Henare
24 Domestic Violence—Victims’ Protection Bill Jan Logie
25 Education (Charter Schools Abolition) Amendment Bill Chris Hipkins
26 Education (Charter Schools Teacher Quality) Amendment Bill Hon Phil Goff
27 Education (Public Good not Profit from Charter Schools) Amendment Bill Dr David Clark
28 Electricity Industry (Energy Efficiency) Amendment Bill Rino Tirikatene
29 Employment Relations (Allowing Higher Earners to Contract Out of Personal Grievance Provisions) Amendment Bill Scott Simpson
30 Employment Relations (Certainty at Work) Amendment Bill Iain Lees-Galloway
31 Employment Relations (Restoring Kiwis’ Right to a Break at Work) Amendment Bill Sue Moroney
32 Employment Relations (Triangular Employment) Amendment Bill Stuart Nash
33 End of Life Choice Bill David Seymour
34 Environment Canterbury (Democracy Restoration) Amendment Bill Dr Megan Woods
35 Equal Pay Amendment Bill Marama Davidson
36 Family Proceedings (Paternity Orders and Parentage Tests) Amendment Bill Jacqui Dean
37 Housing Restructuring and Tenancy Matters (Assured Tenancies) Amendment Bill Jenny Salesa
38 Immigration (Refugee Quota) Amendment Bill Denise Roche
39 Income Tax (Clean Transport FBT Exclusions) Amendment Bill Julie Anne Genter
40 Independent Prison Inspectorate Bill David Clendon
41 International Non-Aggression and Lawful Use of Force (Implementation of Amendment to Statute of Rome) Bill Dr Kennedy Graham
42 International Transparent Treaties Bill Fletcher Tabuteau
43 Kirpan Authorisation Bill Kanwaljit Singh Bakshi
44 Land Transfer (Foreign Ownership of Land Register) Amendment Bill Mahesh Bindra
45 Land Transport (Tourist Driver Rental Vehicle) Amendment Bill Denis O’Rourke
46 Lawyers and Conveyancers (Protection of Community Law Centre Funding) Amendment Bill Carmel Sepuloni
47 Legislation (Climate Impact Disclosure Statement) Amendment Bill James Shaw
48 Life Jackets for Children and Young Persons Bill Alfred Ngaro
49 Litter (Increased Infringement Fee) Amendment Bill Jono Naylor
50 Local Government (Four Well-beings) Amendment Bill Su’a William Sio
51 Local Government (Freedom of Access) Amendment Bill Jonathan Young
52 Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill Joanne Hayes
53 Meat Industry Restructuring Bill Richard Prosser
54 Military Decorations and Distinctive Badges (Modernisation) Amendment Bill Todd Barclay
55 New Zealand Public Health and Disability (Child Health Obesity Target) Amendment Bill Hon Annette King
56 Oaths and Declarations (Endorsing the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi) Amendment Bill Marama Fox
57 Oaths and Declarations (Members of Parliament) Amendment Bill Meka Whaitiri
58 Ombudsmen (Cost Recovery) Amendment Bill Hon David Parker
59 Our Work Our Future Bill Andrew Little
60 Overseas Investment (Protection of New Zealand Homebuyers) Amendment Bill Phil Twyford
61 Private International Law (Choice of Law in Tort) Bill David Bennett
62 Public Finance (Sustainable Development Indicators) Amendment Bill Steffan Browning
63 Public Works (Prohibition of Compulsory Acquisition of Māori Land) Amendment Bill Catherine Delahunty
64 Radio New Zealand (Catch-up Funding) Amendment Bill Clare Curran
65 Radiocommunications (Enhanced Public Broadcasting Provision) Amendment Bill Adrian Rurawhe
66 Receiverships (Agricultural Debt Mediation) Amendment Bill Ron Mark
67 Residential Tenancies (Warm, Safe, and Secure Rentals) Amendment Bill Metiria Turei
68 Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Exemption for RNZRSA Clubs from Special Licencing Requirements for Anzac Day) Amendment Bill Paul Foster-Bell
69 Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Renewal of Licences) Amendment Bill Louisa Wall
70 Sentencing (Domestic Violence) Amendment Bill Poto Williams
71 Sentencing (Livestock Rustling) Amendment Bill Ian McKelvie
72 Shop Trading Hours Act Repeal (Shopping Centre Opening Hours) Amendment Bill Hon Trevor Mallard
73 Social Security (Apprenticeship Assistance for Youth) Amendment Bill Grant Robertson
74 Social Security (Stopping Benefit Payments for Offenders who Repeatedly Fail to Comply with Community Sentences) Amendment Bill Mark Mitchell
75 Summary Offences (Increased Penalty for Seeking Donations by False Pretence) Amendment Bill Nuk Korako
76 Vulnerable Children (Mandatory Social Worker Registration) Amendment Bill Ria Bond
77 Waitemata Harbour Protection Bill Rt Hon Winston Peters
78 Wildlife (Threatened Species Protection) Amendment Bill Kevin Hague

The bills by party (Ministers excluded) are:

  • National – 22/34
  • Labour – 29/32
  • Greens – 14/14
  • NZ First -11/12
  • Maori – 1/1
  • ACT – 1/1
  • Total – 78/94

Really good to see six extra National MPs with bills in the ballot. My campaign must be working!

UPDATE: The four bills selected are:

  • Commerce (Supermarket Adjudicator and Code of Conduct) Amendment Bill – Mojo Mathers
  • Overseas Investment (Protection of New Zealand Homebuyers) Amendment Bill – Phil Twyford
  • Oaths and Declarations (Endorsing the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi) Amendment Bill – Marama Fox
  • Social Security (Stopping Benefit Payments for Offenders who Repeatedly Fail to Comply with Community Sentences) Amendment Bill – Mark Mitchell

So National, Labour, Greens and Maori Party each had a bill selected.

Parliament 11 November 2015

November 11th, 2015 at 1:15 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. TODD BARCLAY to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by his statement that building a more productive and competitive economy that supports jobs and higher incomes is one of the Government’s priorities?
  2. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements regarding New Zealand-born Australian detainees?
  3. PAUL FOSTER-BELL to the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment: How is the Government encouraging New Zealand’s medical technology sector to grow and contribute to the economy?
  4. METIRIA TUREI to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement, “Well, you back the rapists…”?
  5. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: Are health patients getting access to publicly funded health services as prescribed by their health professionals; if not, why not?
  6. JONO NAYLOR to the Minister for Social Housing: What reports has she received about the impact methamphetamine use is having on Housing New Zealand’s ability to house people in need?
  7. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by all his statements regarding Silver Fern Farms; if so, why?
  8. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he agree with Reserve Bank Governor Graeme Wheeler that there are increased risks to financial stability arising from the dairy and housing sectors?
  9. BARBARA KURIGER to the Minister for Primary Industries: What recent reports has he received on the contribution of aquaculture to the Marlborough economy?
  10. CHRIS HIPKINS to the Minister of Education: Is she confident that her Government is fully resourcing the Ministry of Education to provide quality support for schools and students?
  11. JAMES SHAW to the Minister for Climate Change Issues: Does he stand by the Prime Minister’s statement that “New Zealand can hold its head up high when it comes to climate change”?
  12. JOANNE HAYES to the Minister for the Environment: What steps is he taking through the Resource Management Act 1991 process to support cycleways and to facilitate their design and construction as quickly and economically as possible?

National: Five questions on the economy, medical technology sector, Meth, aquaculture and cycleways

Labour: Four questions Australian detainees, health services, financial stability and the Ministry of Education

Greens: Two questions on Australian detainees and climate change

NZ First: One question on Silver Fenr Farms

General Debate 3.00 pm to 4.00 pm

The general debate is 12 speeches of up to five minutes each for a debate of an hour.

Members’ Bills 4.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

Electricity Industry (Small-Scale Renewable Distributed Generation) Amendment Bill – first reading continued

This bill is intended to break down existing barriers and provide a fair regime for small-scale renewable electricity generators to encourage greater renewable distributed generation and to help New Zealand in meeting the goal of 90% renewable electricity by 2025. It is in the name of Green MP Gareth Hughes.

  • Introduced: August 2015

The first reading consists of 11 speeches, with two speeches of up to 10 minutes nine other speeches (including a right of reply) have up to five minutes each each so the debate is a maximum of 65 minutes. There are seven speeches remaining.

Social Security (Pathway to Work) Amendment Bill – first reading

This bill removes the disincentives to engage in part-time work by lifting the threshold of how much persons can earn before their benefit is reduced by abatement rates. It is in the name of Labour MP Carmel Sepuloni.

  • Introduced: September 2015

The first reading consists of 11 speeches, with two speeches of up to 10 minutes nine other speeches (including a right of reply) have up to five minutes each each so the debate is a maximum of 65 minutes.

Climate Change (Divestment from Fossil Fuels) Bill – first reading

This bill would direct public fund managers to divest from companies directly involved in the exploration, mining, and production of fossil fuels.. It is in the name of Green MP James Shaw.

  • Introduced: September 2015

The first reading consists of 11 speeches, with two speeches of up to 10 minutes nine other speeches (including a right of reply) have up to five minutes each each so the debate is a maximum of 65 minutes. There are seven speeches remaining.

Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Amendment Bill – first reading

This bill amends the Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Act 2013, establishing a Technical Advisory Board to which matters must be referred in instances where the Minister will be required to exercise his or her discretion or prescribe an additional area of specified security interest.. It is in the name of Labour MP Clare Curran.

  • Introduced: September 2015

The first reading consists of 11 speeches, with two speeches of up to 10 minutes nine other speeches (including a right of reply) have up to five minutes each each so the debate is a maximum of 65 minutes. There are seven speeches remaining.

Affordable Healthcare Bill – first reading

The bill’s purpose is to encourage people to contribute to their own healthcare costs in a way that is consistent with supporting the public health system. It also makes health insurance a requirement for Parent Category visa applications. It proposes to require Parent Category migrants to have health insurance on arrival and to maintain it in New Zealand for 10 years; remove fringe benefit tax from health insurance; and introduce the SuperGold health insurance premium rebate.. It is in the name of NZ First MP Winston Peters.

  • Introduced: August 2015

The first reading consists of 11 speeches, with two speeches of up to 10 minutes nine other speeches (including a right of reply) have up to five minutes each each so the debate is a maximum of 65 minutes. There are seven speeches remaining.