Parliament 23 September 2015

September 23rd, 2015 at 12:00 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. BARBARA KURIGER to the Minister of Finance: What steps is the Government taking to better position the economy to manage future uncertainty?
  2. JAMES SHAW to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement that his Government has achieved “a lift in the average wage of more than $10,000 dollars a year”?
  3. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Why did he say that pandas are “a subject dear to my heart” and taxpayer money would be made available to get pandas for Wellington Zoo?
  4. NUK KORAKO to the Minister for Canterbury Earthquake Recovery: What is the estimated value of public sector construction completed and underway in Christchurch?
  5. FLETCHER TABUTEAU to the Minister of Defence: Does he stand by all his statements?
  6. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by his statement in relation to capital contributions to the NZ Super Fund that “saving by borrowing is like building up your savings with your credit card, it just doesn’t make sense”; if so, what has been the average return per annum since the NZ Super Fund was created?
  7. Dr KENNEDY GRAHAM to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his Government’s policies?
  8. JACINDA ARDERN to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his response yesterday, when asked whether his Chief of Staff was trying to stop him talking about the flag during speeches, that “Far from that being correct, I think record numbers of people are turning up”?
  9. Dr SHANE RETI to the Minister of Education: What recent announcement has she made to improve teachers’ learning and development so that it lifts student achievement?
  10. POTO WILLIAMS to the Minister for the Community and Voluntary Sector: Does she believe that community housing providers with programmes that include home ownership should be able to be defined as charities based on the definition of charitable purpose within the Charities Act 2005?
  11. MATT DOOCEY to the Minister of Transport: What progress has the Government made on delivering the Urban Cycleways Programme in Canterbury?
  12. MAHESH BINDRA to the Minister of Corrections: Does he stand by all his statements?

National: Four questions on the economy, Christchurch construction, student achievement, and urban cycleways

Labour: Four questions on pandas, NZ Super Fund, NZ Flag and community housing

Greens: Two questions on average wage and PM standing by his policies

NZ First: Two questions on Defence and Corrections Minister standing by their statements

General Debate 3.00 pm to 4.00 pm

The general debate consists of 12 speeches of up to five minutes each for a maximum debate of one hour.

Government Bills 4.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

Accident Compensation (Financial Responsibility and Transparency) Amendment Bill – third reading

Parliament 22 September 2015

September 22nd, 2015 at 11:53 am by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements after almost seven years as Prime Minister?
  2. RON MARK to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  3. JOANNE HAYES to the Minister of Finance: What progress is the Government making towards its target of returning to fiscal surplus this year and in achieving its other fiscal priorities?
  4. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements after almost seven years as Prime Minister?
  5. JAMES SHAW to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements after almost seven years as Prime Minister?
  6. JACQUI DEAN to the Minister of Local Government: What progress has been made by the Government’s Rules Reduction Taskforce to get rid of “loopy” rules?
  7. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements after almost seven years as Prime Minister?
  8. SCOTT SIMPSON to the Minister of Health: Can he confirm this Government has expanded the number of children who are benefiting from free GP visits and prescriptions from 400,000 children to over 750,000?
  9. Dr KENNEDY GRAHAM to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements after almost seven years as Prime Minister?
  10. JONO NAYLOR to the Minister for Social Development: What progress has the Government made on implementing the Children’s Action Plan?
  11. JACINDA ARDERN to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements after almost seven years as Prime Minister?
  12. STUART SMITH to the Minister for Primary Industries: How is the Government supporting sustainability in aquaculture?

National: Five questions on the surplus, rules reduction taskforce, free GP visits, Children’s Action Plan and aquaculature

Labour: Four questions on whether the PM stands by all his statements

Greens: Two questions on whether the PM stands by all his statements

NZ First: One question on whether the PM stands by all his statements

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

Accident Compensation (Financial Responsibility and Transparency) Amendment Bill – committee stage

Passports Amendment Bill (No 2) – committee stage

“The Passports Amendment Bill (No 2) modernises the Passports Act 1992 by extending the maximum validity period of the New Zealand passport from 5 years to 10 years for persons who are at least 16 years old and by taking into account certain changes in technology.

  • Introduced June 2015
  • 1st reading: June 2015, passed unanimously
  • SC report: August 2015, supported with amendments unanimously
  • 2nd reading: September 2015, passed unanimously

There is no time limit for the committee stage but it is estimated to be up to a three hour debate as the bill has two parts and preliminary provisions to debate.

Tariff (Free Trade Agreement between New Zealand and the Republic of Korea) Amendment Bill – second reading

This Bill amends New Zealand law as part of the implementation of the Free Trade Agreement between New Zealand and the Republic of Korea.

  • Introduced: June 2015
  • 1st reading: June 2015, passed 95 to 26 with Greens and NZ First opposed
  • SC report: July 2015, supported unanimously without amendments
  • 2nd reading: September 2015, passed 95 to 24 with Greens and NZ First opposed

There is no time limit for the committee stage but it is estimated to be relatively brief.

 

New member’s bills

September 18th, 2015 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

The three bills drawn from the ballot yesterday are:

Social Security (Pathway to Work) Amendment Bill – Labour MP Carmel Sepuloni

This Bill lifts the threshold of how much persons can earn before their benefit is reduced by abatement rates. The thresholds
are currently $80 per week for those on Jobseeker Support and $100 per week for Sole Parent Payment and Supported Living Payment and this increases them to $150 per week.

It is not necessarily a bad thing to have a higher threshold before abatement starts, but what would be useful to know is the cost to the taxpayer if this bill is accepted.

Climate Change (Divestment from Fossil Fuels) Bill – Green MP Dr Russel Norman

This bill will would ban public fund managers (such as ACC, NZ Super Fund, Govt Super Fund) from investing in companies directly involved in the mining and production of fossil fuels.

It is a ridiculous bill.

Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Amendment Bill – Labour MP Clare Curran

This Bill amends the Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Act 2013 and establishes a Technical Advisory Board to which matters must be referred in instances where the Minister will be required to exercise his or her discretion or prescribe an additional area of specified security interest.

I think this bill is worth supporting, at least at first reading. The TAB would provide expert advice to the Minister on network security, and they can analyse and make recommendations around intended directives.

Members’ bills ballot 17 September 2015

September 17th, 2015 at 10:27 am by David Farrar

A Members’ bill ballot will be held at noon today. Three bills will be drawn.

The bills entered in the ballot are listed below.

  Bill Title Member Name
1 Accident Compensation (Recent Migrants and Returning New Zealanders) Amendment Bill Melissa Lee
2 Age of Majority (Attainment at 18 Years) Amendment Bill Brett Hudson
3 Better Public Service Target Results Independent Audit Bill Darroch Ball
4 Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill Dr Jian Yang
5 Broadcasting (Games of National Significance) Amendment Bill Barbara Stewart
6 Buy New Zealand (Procurement) Bill Fletcher Tabuteau
7 Charter Schools (Application of Official Information and Ombudsmen Acts) Bill Hon Nanaia Mahuta
8 Child Poverty Reduction and Eradication Bill Jacinda Ardern
9 Children, Young Persons, and Their Families (Parent’s and Guardian’s Responsibility) Amendment Bill Barbara Kuriger
10 Climate Change (Divestment from Fossil Fuels) Bill Dr Russel Norman
11 Commerce (Supermarket Adjudicator and Code of Conduct) Amendment Bill Mojo Mathers
12 Copyright (Parody and Satire) Amendment Bill Gareth Hughes
13 Credit Contracts and Consumer Finance (Break Fees Disclosure) Amendment Bill Simon O’Connor
14 Credit Reforms (Responsible Lending) Bill Kris Faafoi
15 Crimes (Corporate Manslaughter) Amendment Bill Hon Damien O’Connor
16 Crimes (Non-fatal Strangulation) Amendment Bill Kelvin Davis
17 Criminal Procedure (Removing Paedophile Name Suppression) Amendment Bill Pita Paraone
18 Crown Minerals (Protection of World Heritage Sites) Amendment Bill Hon Ruth Dyson
19 Customs and Excise (Prohibition of Imports Made by Slave Labour) Amendment Bill Peeni Henare
20 Domestic Violence—Victims’ Protection Bill Jan Logie
21 Education (Charter Schools Abolition) Amendment Bill Chris Hipkins
22 Education (Charter Schools Teacher Quality) Amendment Bill Hon Phil Goff
23 Education (Public Good not Profit from Charter Schools) Amendment Bill Dr David Clark
24 Education (Restoration of Democracy to University Councils) Amendment Bill Hon David Cunliffe
25 Electricity Industry (Energy Efficiency) Amendment Bill Rino Tirikatene
26 Electricity Transparency Bill David Shearer
27 Employment Relations (Allowing Higher Earners to Contract Out of Personal Grievance Provisions) Amendment Bill Scott Simpson
28 Employment Relations (Certainty at Work) Amendment Bill Iain Lees-Galloway
29 Employment Relations (Restoring Kiwis’ Right to a Break at Work) Amendment Bill Jenny Salesa
30 Employment Relations (Triangular Employment) Amendment Bill Stuart Nash
31 Environment Canterbury (Democracy Restoration) Amendment Bill Dr Megan Woods
32 Family Proceedings (Paternity Orders and Parentage Tests) Amendment Bill Jacqui Dean
33 Healthy Homes Guarantee Bill (No 2) Andrew Little
34 Immigration (Refugee Quota) Amendment Bill Denise Roche
35 Independent Prison Inspectorate Bill David Clendon
36 International Non-Aggression and Lawful Use of Force (Implementation of Amendment to Statute of Rome) Bill Dr Kennedy Graham
37 Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary Establishment Bill Eugenie Sage
38 Kirpan Authorisation Bill Kanwaljit Singh Bakshi
39 Kiwi Jobs Bill Sue Moroney
40 Land Transfer (Foreign Ownership of Land Register) Amendment Bill Mahesh Bindra
41 Land Transport (Tourist Driver Rental Vehicle) Amendment Bill Denis O’Rourke
42 Land Transport (Vulnerable Road Users) Amendment Bill Julie Anne Genter
43 Legislation (Climate Impact Disclosure Statement) Amendment Bill James Shaw
44 Life Jackets for Children and Young Persons Bill Alfred Ngaro
45 Local Government (Four Well-beings) Amendment Bill Su’a William Sio
46 Local Government (Freedom of Access) Amendment Bill Paul Foster-Bell
47 Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill Joanne Hayes
48 Meat Industry Restructuring Bill Richard Prosser
49 New Zealand Public Health and Disability (Child Health Obesity Target) Amendment Bill Hon Annette King
50 Oaths and Declarations (Endorsing the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi) Amendment Bill Marama Fox
51 Oaths and Declarations (Members of Parliament) Amendment Bill Meka Whaitiri
52 Overseas Investment (Protection of New Zealand Homebuyers) Amendment Bill Phil Twyford
53 Private International Law (Choice of Law in Tort) Bill David Bennett
54 Prostitution Reform (Regulate Street Prostitution) Amendment Bill Tracey Martin
55 Public Finance (Sustainable Development Indicators) Amendment Bill Steffan Browning
56 Public Works (Prohibition of Compulsory Acquisition of Māori Land) Amendment Bill Catherine Delahunty
57 Radiocommunications (Enhanced Public Broadcasting Provision) Amendment Bill Adrian Rurawhe
58 Receiverships (Agricultural Debt Mediation) Amendment Bill Ron Mark
59 Residential Tenancies (Warm, Safe, and Secure Rentals) Amendment Bill Metiria Turei
60 Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Renewal of Licences) Amendment Bill Louisa Wall
61 Sentencing (Domestic Violence) Amendment Bill Poto Williams
62 Sentencing (Livestock Rustling) Amendment Bill Ian McKelvie
63 Shop Trading Hours Act Repeal (Shopping Centre Opening Hours) Amendment Bill Hon Trevor Mallard
64 Social Security (Apprenticeship Assistance for Youth) Amendment Bill Grant Robertson
65 Social Security (Pathway to Work) Amendment Bill Carmel Sepuloni
66 Social Security (Stopping Benefit Payments for Offenders who Repeatedly Fail to Comply with Community Sentences) Amendment Bill Mark Mitchell
67 Summary Offences (Drink or Drugs Affecting Behaviour) Amendment Bill Clayton Mitchell
68 Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Amendment Bill Clare Curran
69 Vulnerable Children (Mandatory Social Worker Registration) Amendment Bill Ria Bond
70 Waitemata Harbour Protection Bill Rt Hon Winston Peters
71 Wildlife (Threatened Species Protection) Amendment Bill Kevin Hague

The bills by party (Ministers excluded) are:

  • National – 14/34
  • Labour – 30/32
  • Greens – 14/14
  • NZ First -12/12
  • Maori – 1/1
  • ACT – 0/1
  • Total – 71/94

If the other 20 National MPs got a bill in the ballot (or could get agreement of the hierarchy for their bills) then the chances of a non hostile bill being drawn would increase from 14/71 to 34/91 or from 20% to 37%.

Satire rule to go

September 17th, 2015 at 5:49 am by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

Parliament looks set to ditch a controversial and unused provision against using television footage from the debating chamber for satire or to ridicule or denigrate them.

The “anti satire” rule came about during the previous Labour government and was apparently aimed at preventing people from using Parliament TV footage for you-tube videos mocking MPs and Parliament.

The rule has never been used and the Clerk of the House and Parliamentary Press Gallery said in submissions to the Privileges Committee that it risked making Parliament “seem out of touch and weary of criticism”.

The Privileges Committee agreed though expressed reservations about people using Parliament TV footage to present a “false or misleading account of parliamentary proceedings”. 

Glad to see the Privileges Committee agree the ban on satirical use should go. Was also good to see the Clerk of the House advocating for its removal.

The committee’s report followed an inquiry into the use of social media as a growing number of MPs use twitter, live streaming and Facebook to communicate with voters. 

Recent examples including criticism of Parliament’s Speaker sparked the inquiry, which looked at whether there should be rules slapped on social media that made it a contempt to make certain comments or use video or photographic footage in some instances. Speaker David Carter had asked them to consider the matter.

But the committee backed away from new rules governing what MPs posted on social media when the House was sitting, saying any comments made by MPs on social media, including comments made from the debating Chamber, were not part of parliamentary proceedings.

However, it also warned that MPs were not protected by Parliamentary privilege, so should be aware that anything they said on social media was potentially actionable in court.

Also that MPs could be found in contempt under existing rules for what they say about other MPs.

 

Parliament 16 September 2015

September 16th, 2015 at 11:58 am by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. DAVID BENNETT to the Minister of Finance: How is New Zealand’s labour market supporting resilience and delivering higher incomes for families?
  2. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Why did he say in July last year that “We think unemployment will be down to 4.5 percent in the very foreseeable future”, given unemployment has risen in each successive quarter, and now stands at 5.9 percent?
  3. DAVID CLENDON to the Minister of Corrections: What was the reason for issuing each of the seven performance notices to Serco, which were then withdrawn; and what was the dollar amount for each of those notices?
  4. MELISSA LEE to the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment: How is the Government helping students make more informed tertiary study decisions?
  5. FLETCHER TABUTEAU to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  6. KANWALJIT SINGH BAKSHI to the Minister for Building and Housing: Can he confirm that the 1,116 building consents issued in July in Auckland, and the 8,567 for the latest year, are the highest in 10 years, and what further steps is he talking to ensure the new build rate of houses in Auckland continues to grow?
  7. PHIL TWYFORD to the Minister for Building and Housing: How much does MBIE estimate has been saved on building materials for a standard home by the Government’s suspensions of tariffs and anti-dumping duties on building products and, since its commencement in July 2014, by how many dollars has the price of the average Auckland home increased?
  8. GARETH HUGHES to the Minister of Energy and Resources: Does he agree with the Treasury that solar electricity generation is one of the opportunities with the “most potential” to “reduce our carbon dioxide emissions in the medium-to-long-term”; if so, does he think the current rules are working to give Kiwis going solar a fair go?
  9. JACINDA ARDERN to the Minister for Social Development: If reducing child poverty is a priority for her Government, why has the number of children living in poverty, based on the Household Incomes Report, increased from 260,000 in 2013, to 305,000 in 2014?
  10. TODD MULLER to the Minister for Primary Industries: What recent reports has he received on growth in the avocado industry?
  11. RICHARD PROSSER to the Minister of Conservation: Does she have confidence in all aspects of her department’s use of compound 1080 poison?
  12. Hon DAVID CUNLIFFE to the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment: Does he stand by all his statements to the House last week in respect of tertiary education organisations?

National: Four questions on the labour market, tertisry students, building consents and avocados.

Labour: Four questions on unemployment, building tariffs, child poverty and tertiary institutes

Greens: Two questions on Mt Eden Prison and solar energy

NZ First: Two questions on PM standing by his statements and 1080

General Debate 3.00 pm to 4.00 pm

The general debate is 12 speeches of up to five minutes each for a debate of an hour.

Privileges Committee report 4.00 pm to 6.00 pm

Question of privilege regarding use of social media to report on parliamentary proceedings

Each MP can speak for up to 10 minutes on this debate. There is no time limit but it is likely the Speaker would close the debate before two hours.

Local Bill 7.30 pm to 9.30 pm

Wellington Town Belt Bill – first reading

This bill changes the legal framework for the Wellington Town Belt, with the aim of strengthening the protection of, and modernising the governance arrangements for, the Town Belt. It is in the name of Wellington Central MP Grant Robertson.

  • Introduced September 2015

The first reading consists of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each so the debate is a maximum of two hours.

Members’ Bills 9.30 pm to 10.00 pm

New Zealand Superannuation and Retirement Income (Pro Rata Entitlement) Amendment Bill – first reading

The bill amends the New Zealand Superannuation and Retirement Income Act 2001 to provide for a pro rata entitlement (PRE) to New Zealand superannuation (NZS) based on residence and presence in New Zealand between the ages of 20 and 65 years. The Bill also removes the “direct deduction” provisions of the Social Security Act 1964 which provide for the deduction of overseas pension from the New Zealand Superannuation paid to people who receive those pensions. It is in the name of NZ First MP Denis O’Rourke.

  • Introduced June 2015

The first reading consists of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each so the debate is a maximum of two hours.

Extended Sitting 9.00 am to 1.00 pm (Thursday)

Government Notices of Motion

  1. That, pursuant to sections 3(1), 3(4) and 5(1) of the Ombudsmen Act 1975, Peter Francis Boshier be appointed as an Ombudsman for a term of 5 years, with effect from 10 December 2015, and upon taking up the office of Ombudsman, he be appointed as Chief Ombudsman with effect from the date that the incumbent Chief Ombudsman vacates the position.
  2. That, pursuant to section 11(2) and clause 2 of Schedule 3 of the Public Audit Act 2001, the House recommend to the Governor-General that Greg Mark Schollum of Wellington be appointed as the Deputy Controller and Auditor-General for a term not exceeding 5 years with effect from 28 September 2015.
  3. That, pursuant to section 5 of the Independent Police Conduct Authority Act 1988 and section 32 of the Crown Entities Act 2004, this House recommends His Excellency the Governor-General reappoints Dianne Mary Macaskill and appoints Simon Murdoch, CNZM each as members of the Independent Police Conduct Authority, for terms of three years.
  4. That, pursuant to section 10 of the Contraception, Sterilisation and Abortion Act 1977, this House recommends His Excellency the Governor-General reappoints Dame Linda Holloway as Chair, reappoints Dr Tangimoana Habib as a member and appoints Ms Carolyn McIlraith as a member of the Abortion Supervisory Committee each for terms of three years.

Speeches for the first two motions are ten minutes each and for the next two, five minutes each. There is no time limit but the debates are not expected to be overly long.

Government Bills

Reserves and Other Lands Disposal Bill – third reading

The bill makes a number of changes to the status of parcels of land, land titles, and previous Reserves and Other Lands Disposal Acts.

  • Introduced: July 2008
  • 1st reading: March 2009, passed 113 to 9 with only Greens opposed
  • Select Committee report: September 2009, supported unanimously with amendments
  • 2nd reading: May 2015, passed unanimously
  • Committee of the Whole: July 2015, passed 109 to 12 with only NZ First opposed

The third reading consists of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each so the debate is a maximum of two hours.

Building (Pools) Amendment Bill – first reading

This Bill will amend the Building Act 2004 and repeal the Fencing of Swimming Pools Act 1987 to reduce the compliance burden currently imposed on pool owners and territorial authorities in relation to residential pools while maintaining child safety.

  • Introduced September 2015

The first reading consists of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each so the debate is a maximum of two hours.

Parliament 15 September 2015

September 15th, 2015 at 11:45 am by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: What did he mean by his statement, “we want Housing New Zealand to be doing the best job it can”?
  2. Dr PARMJEET PARMAR to the Minister of Finance: How is the Government’s programme of economic reform supporting the resilience of the New Zealand economy?
  3. FLETCHER TABUTEAU to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  4. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he agree with the forecast of the Reserve Bank that unemployment will rise to 6.1 percent by March next year; if so what new action, if any, will he take to avoid this happening?
  5. JAMI-LEE ROSS to the Minister for Economic Development:How is the Government helping New Zealand businesses to grow their exports?
  6. JAMES SHAW to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement made yesterday on the flag referendum that “I’ve been very strongly of the view I think it’s in New Zealand’s interests to change, and I, you know, I hope the political parties can see past the petty politics of that”?
  7. RON MARK to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  8. Dr DAVID CLARK to the Minister for Economic Development: What concerns, if any, does he have about the state of the South Island economy, given the ANZ Regional Trends report shows that it shrank by 0.8 percent in the June quarter?
  9. STUART SMITH to the Minister for Social Development: What is the Government doing to support sole parents off benefits and into study?
  10. DAVID CLENDON to the Minister of Corrections: How many Specific Deductions were issued to SERCO, and then withdrawn, since SERCO took over management of Mt Eden Corrections Facility; and what is the amount of each of those withdrawals?
  11. Dr MEGAN WOODS to the Minister responsible for the Earthquake Commission: Can he confirm that, based on the MBIE survey findings, EQC expects to remediate one-third of homes with “jack and pack” repairs in Canterbury; if so, what will the costs to EQC be?
  12. SIMON O’CONNOR to the Acting Minister of Energy and Resources: What recent reports has he received on smart electricity grid development in New Zealand?

National: Four questions on the economy, exports, welfare reform and electricity

Labour: Four questions on Housing NZ, unemployment, South Island economy and EQC

Greens: Two questions on flag referendum and Mt Eden Prison

NZ First: Two idential questions on PM standing by his statements

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

International Finance Agreements Amendment Bill – first reading

The Bill amends the International Finance Agreements Act 1961 in order to enable the Government to become a member of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank.

  • Introduced September 2015

The first reading consists of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each for a maximum debate of two hours.

Māori Purposes Bill – first reading

This Bill is an omnibus Bill that amends the Maori Purposes Act 1991, which governs the Wi Pere Trust and the Maori Trust Boards (Transitional Provisions) Order 2012.

  • Introduced July 2015

The first reading consists of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each for a maximum debate of two hours.

Child Protection (Child Sex Offender Register) Bill – first reading

The bill establishes a Child Sex Offender Register that aims to reduce sexual reoffending against child victims, and the risk posed by serious child sex offenders by providing government agencies with the information needed to monitor child sex offenders in the community and providing up-to-date information that assists the Police to more rapidly resolve cases of child sex offending.

  • Introduced August 2015

The first reading consists of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each for a maximum debate of two hours.

 

 

Parliament 10 September 2015

September 10th, 2015 at 12:01 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. ANDREW BAYLY to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received on the New Zealand economy?
  2. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: Why did he say on 29 July that core Crown health expenditure covers “most, but not all, inflationary pressures”, and why does he deny this shortfall is having an impact on patients?
  3. Dr SHANE RETI to the Minister of Health: Can he confirm that 36,076 colonoscopies were performed in the last financial year, a 12 percent increase on the year before?
  4. CLAYTON MITCHELL to the Minister for Workplace Relations and Safety: Does he stand by all his statements?
  5. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by all his statements?
  6. TODD MULLER to the Minister for Primary Industries: What recent reports has he received on growth in kiwifruit exports?
  7. JACINDA ARDERN to the Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage: Was she, as Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage consulted during the flag design process, and is she satisfied with the outcome as one of the responsible Ministers?
  8. JOANNE HAYES to the Minister for Women: What reports has she received relating to the benefits of employing women in trades and construction for the Canterbury rebuild?
  9. JULIE ANNE GENTER to the Minister of Finance: Does he have confidence in the Reserve Bank in light of today’s Official Cash Rate cut which has now reversed 75 points of the 100-point hike it made in 2014?
  10. Hon DAVID CUNLIFFE to the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment: What is the name of the tertiary education institution he referred to in his answer to Oral Question No 9 yesterday that had its focused review “elevated to a full review”, and what is the nature of the allegations that his officials are now investigating?
  11. RIA BOND to the Minister of Communications: Does she stand by all her statements?
  12. KEVIN HAGUE to the Minister of Conservation: Does she stand by her statement, “We are doing everything we can to protect the Maui’s dolphin”?

National: Four questions on the economy, colonscopies, kiwfruit exports and female employment in Canterbury

Labour: Four questions on health spending, Minister of Finance standing by his statements, NZ Flag and tertiary education

Greens: Two questions on the Reserve Bank and Maui’s Dolphin

NZ First: Two questions on Labour and Commons Ministers standing by their statements

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm

Taxation (Land Information and Offshore Persons Information) Bill – third reading

This bill amends the Land Transfer Act 1952 and other acts to gather better information for tax compliance from dealings in land. It promotes the enforcement of tax obligations of offshore persons generally and is intended to give Inland Revenue greater assurance about the identity of the offshore person.

  • Introduced June 2015
  • 1st reading: June 2015, passed 63 to 53 with Labour, Greens and NZ First opposed
  • SC report: August 2015, supported with amendments by majority with a minority report from Labour
  • 2nd reading: August 2015, passed 109 to 12, NZ First opposed
  • Committee of the whole House: September 2015

The third reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

Passports Amendment Bill (No 2) – second reading continued

“The Passports Amendment Bill (No 2) modernises the Passports Act 1992 by extending the maximum validity period of the New Zealand passport from 5 years to 10 years for persons who are at least 16 years old and by taking into account certain changes in technology.

  • Introduced June 2015
  • 1st reading: June 2015, passed unanimously
  • SC report: August 2015, supported with amendments unanimously

The second reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours. There are three speeches remaining.

Tariff (Free Trade Agreement between New Zealand and the Republic of Korea) Amendment Bill – second reading

This Bill amends New Zealand law as part of the implementation of the Free Trade Agreement between New Zealand and the Republic of Korea.

  • Introduced: June 2015
  • 1st reading: June 2015, passed 95 to 26 with Greens and NZ First opposed
  • SC report: July 2015, supported unanimously without amendments

The second reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

 

Parliament 9 September 2015

September 9th, 2015 at 12:00 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. JAMES SHAW to the Minister for Climate Change Issues: Are New Zealand officials working to soften the climate change declaration to be adopted at the Pacific Islands Forum?
  2. ALFRED NGARO to the Minister of Finance: How are household balance sheets supporting resilience in the New Zealand economy?
  3. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he agree with the Prime Minister’s statement that a rising exchange rate “is a sign of confidence in New Zealand”?
  4. SCOTT SIMPSON to the Minister of Health: Can he confirm that 98 percent of general practices across New Zealand are offering free visits for under-13-year-olds, covering 770,000 eligible children or 99 percent of all under-13s?
  5. FLETCHER TABUTEAU to the Minister for Economic Development: Does he stand by all his statements?
  6. PHIL TWYFORD to the Minister responsible for HNZC: Why has the Government extracted more than half a billion dollars in dividends from Housing NZ when there are over 3,000 people on the waiting list, children dying in cold, damp homes, and a shortage of houses?
  7. TIM MACINDOE to the Minister of Transport: What update can he provide on progress with construction on the Government‘s Waikato Expressway Road of National Significance?
  8. DENISE ROCHE to the Minister of Immigration: Does he agree with the manager of the Mangere Refugee Resettlement Centre, who said “We’ll make it work” when asked if they can accommodate the extra Syrian arrivals?
  9. Hon DAVID CUNLIFFE to the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment: How much funding have tertiary institutes been forced to repay to the Tertiary Education Commission in the past year as a result of overfunding, and does he still have confidence that the Tertiary Education Commission’s regular monitoring procedures are working?
  10. BRETT HUDSON to the Minister of Communications: What recent announcements has she made on expanding Ultra-Fast Broadband to New Zealanders?
  11. MARAMA FOX to the Minister for Social Development: What is she doing to investigate any concerns raised by families who are being denied access to their children in care because of Child, Youth and Family processes?
  12. Hon DAMIEN O’CONNOR to the Minister for Primary Industries: Does he think it’s in the best interest of primary industries for a controlling interest to be potentially taken by foreign investors in New Zealand’s largest meat processing company, Silver Fern Farms?

National: Four questions on the economy, under 13 GP visits, Waikato Expressway, and ultra-fast broadband

Labour: Four questions on the exchange rate, Housing NZ, the Tertiary Education Commission and Silver Fern Farms

Greens: Two questions on climate change and refugees

NZ First: One question on Economic Development Minister Minister standing by his statement

Maori: One question on CYF

General Debate 3.00 pm to 4.00 pm

The general debate consist of 12 speeches of up to five minutes each for a maximum debate of one hour.

Government Bills 4.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

Passports Amendment Bill (No 2) – second reading continued

“The Passports Amendment Bill (No 2) modernises the Passports Act 1992 by extending the maximum validity period of the New Zealand passport from 5 years to 10 years for persons who are at least 16 years old and by taking into account certain changes in technology.

  • Introduced June 2015
  • 1st reading: June 2015, passed unanimously
  • SC report: August 2015, supported with amendments unanimously

The second reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

Taxation (Transformation: First Phase Simplification and Other Measures) Bill – first reading

The bill amends several statutes relating to taxation in order to facilitate easier communication with Inland Revenue, simplify tax rules and provide for the sharing of information.

  • Introduced: June 2015

The first reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

Environmental Reporting Bill – third reading

 The bill provides for independent environmental reports in the areas of air, climate and atmosphere, freshwater, marine and land.
  • Introduced February 2014
  • 1st reading: March 2014, passed 78 to 41 with Labour and NZ First opposed
  • Select Committee report: March 2015, supported with amendments by the majority, minority views by Labour and Greens
  • 2nd reading: May 2015, passed 61 to 60 with Labour, Greens, NZ First and Maori Party opposed
  • Committee of the whole House: June 2015, passed 63 to 58 with Labour, Greens and NZ First opposed

The third reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

Parliament 8 September 2015

September 8th, 2015 at 11:38 am by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Why did he say “Plan A is a good plan” given the state of regional economies?
  2. JAMES SHAW to the Minister of Immigration: Does he stand by his statement to this House in June of this year that “The Government still has an open mind on that quota number”?
  3. PAUL FOSTER-BELL to the Minister of Finance: What recent reports has he received highlighting the resilience of the New Zealand economy?
  4. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: Does he stand by his statement on 29 July that core Crown health expenditure covers “most, but not all, inflationary pressures”; and what impact has this shortfall had on patients?
  5. Dr JIAN YANG to the Minister of Science and Innovation: What new investment is the Government making in “high quality” research?
  6. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Minister for Economic Development: Does he stand by all his statements?
  7. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: When did Treasury first advise him that economic conditions were starting to mirror the downside scenario in his 2015 Budget?
  8. JACQUI DEAN to the Minister of Health: Can he confirm that over half a million patients received a First Specialist Assessment in the last financial year, an increase of 26 percent on the number performed in 2008/09?
  9. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Minister for Māori Development: Does he stand by all his statements?
  10. PHIL TWYFORD to the Minister for Building and Housing: Why did he say that the building materials industry “needs a shake-up through increased competition and greater transparency to ensure Kiwi families can get access to more fairly priced building materials and homes”?
  11. STEFFAN BROWNING to the Minister for Primary Industries: Will the Government provide compensation to farmers whose cows fell ill or died from eating herbicide-tolerant swedes?
  12. JONATHAN YOUNG to the Minister of Transport: What recent reports has he seen on increased competition in the aviation industry that supports regional New Zealand?

National: Four questions on the economy, research, surgical assessments and aviation competition

Labour: Four questions on regional economies, health spending, the economy and the building industry

Greens: Two questions on refugees and cows eating herbicide-tolerant swedes

NZ First: Two questions on Economic Development Minister and Maori Development Ministers standing by their statements

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

Taxation (Land Information and Offshore Persons Information) Bill – second reading

This bill amends the Land Transfer Act 1952 and other acts to gather better information for tax compliance from dealings in land. It promotes the enforcement of tax obligations of offshore persons generally and is intended to give Inland Revenue greater assurance about the identity of the offshore person.

  • Introduced June 2015
  • 1st reading: June 2015, passed 63 to 53 with Labour, Greens and NZ First opposed
  • SC report: August 2015, supported with amendments by majority with a minority report from Labour

The second reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

Taxation (Bright-line Test for Residential Land) Bill – first reading continued

This Bill introduces amendments to the Income Tax Act 2007 and the Tax Administration Act 1994 so that residential land (except a main home) sold within two years of acquisition is automatically deemed a capital gain and taxed.

  • Introduced: August 2015

The first reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours. There are 11 speeches remaining

Employment Standards Legislation Bill – first reading

This bill promotes fairer and more productive workplaces by providing enhanced protections and benefits for both employers and employees through a number of improvements to the employment relations–employment standards legislative framework.

  • Introduced: August 2015

The first reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

Extended Sitting 9.00 am (Wed) to 1.00 pm

Te Kawerau ā Maki Claims Settlement Bill – committee stage and third reading

This bill gives effect to the deed of settlement entered into by the Crown and Te Kawerau a Maki on 22 February 2014 for the final settlement of historical Treaty of Waitangi claims of Te Kawerau a Maki.

  • Introduced April 2014
  • 1st reading: November 2014, passed unanimously
  • SC report: May 2015, supported as amended without dissent
  • 2nd reading: June 2015, passed unanimously

There is not expected to be lengthy debate at the committee stage. There is one SOP from the Minister.

The third reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

Te Hiku Claims Settlement Bill – committee stage and third reading

This bill gives effect  to the deeds of settlement in which the Crown and Ngati Kuri, Te Aupouri, NgaiTakoto, and Te Rarawa agreed to the final settlement of the historical Treaty of Waitangi claims of those iwi.

  • Introduced April 2014
  • 1st reading: November 2014, passed unanimously
  • SC report: May 2015, supported as amended without dissent
  • 2nd reading: June 2015, passed unanimously

There is not expected to be lengthy debate at the committee stage. There are two SOPs from the Minister.

The third reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

 

 

Parliament 27 August 2015

August 27th, 2015 at 1:22 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. DARROCH BALL to the Minister for Social Development: Does she stand by all her statements?
  2. ALASTAIR SCOTT to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received that expect the economy to deliver more jobs and higher wages for New Zealand families over the next three years?
  3. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: If Government health expenditure has not kept up with all inflationary pressures, as he admitted on 29 July, what impact has this shortfall had on patients?
  4. JONO NAYLOR to the Minister of Justice: What initiatives has she announced to support judges making family violence bail decisions?
  5. JAN LOGIE to the Minister for Social Development: Will she make an emergency one-off injection of funding into Child Youth and Family to address concerns about the safety of children in state care raised by the Children’s Commissioner today?
  6. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by the Prime Minister’s statement that “the removal of the $1,000 kick-start contribution will not make a blind bit of difference to the number of people who join KiwiSaver”?
  7. SARAH DOWIE to the Minister of Health: Can he confirm that rheumatic fever rates have dropped 24 percent since 2012 following the Government investing more than $65 million on a range of initiatives to combat the disease?
  8. BARBARA STEWART to the Minister of Health: Does he agree with Alzheimers New Zealand’s Catherine Hall that “dementia is one of the most significant healthcare challenges facing us globally and in New Zealand”; if not, why not?
  9. CHRIS HIPKINS to the Minister of Education: Does she stand by her predecessor’s statement in 2010 regarding truancy that “We cannot sit back and do nothing. These figures are really shocking and we need to get serious about tackling this problem”; if so, by how much has the truancy rate increased since then?
  10. MATT DOOCEY to the Minister of Tourism: How is the Government supporting growth in the tourism sector?
  11. CARMEL SEPULONI to the Minister for Social Development: Does she agree with the statement by the Children’s Commissioner that “we don’t know if children are better off as a result of state intervention, but the indications are not good”?
  12. DAVID SEYMOUR to the Minister for Building and Housing: Does he agree with the Deputy Governor of the Reserve Bank, that the key problems with housing supply are “a limited supply of land ready for building; restrictive planning processes, and a lack of coordinated planning in infrastructure development”?

National: Four questions on the economy, bail, rheumatic fever and tourism

Labour: Four questions on health spending, KiwiSaver, truancy and CYF

Greens: One question on CYF

NZ First: Two questions MSD Minister standing by her statements and dementia

ACT: One question on housing supply

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm

Health and Safety Reform Bill – third reading

The Bill replaces the Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992 and the Machinery Act 1950 to reform New Zealand’s workplace health and safety system, following the work of the Independent Taskforce on Workplace Health and Safety and the Royal Commission on the Pike River Coal Mine tragedy.

  • Introduced March 2014
  • 1st reading: March 2014, passed unanimously
  • SC report: July 2015, passed with amendments by majority with Labour, Green and NZ First minority reports
  • 2nd reading: July 2015, passed 63 to 56 with Labour, Greens and NZ First against
  • Committee of the whole House: August 2015

The third reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

Note the bill has now been divided into five separate bills.

Taxation (Bright-line Test for Residential Land) Bill – first reading

This Bill introduces amendments to the Income Tax Act 2007 and the Tax Administration Act 1994 so that residential land (except a main home) sold within two years of acquisition is automatically deemed a capital gain and taxed.

  • Introduced: August 2015

The first reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

 

Parliament 26 August 2015

August 26th, 2015 at 11:45 am by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. NUK KORAKO to the Minister of Finance: How is the Government’s fiscal strategy supporting resilience in the New Zealand economy?
  2. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he have confidence in the Minister responsible for Housing New Zealand Corporation?
  3. SIMON O’CONNOR to the Minister of Health: What reports has he received on New Zealand’s health system?
  4. METIRIA TUREI to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all of his Government’s policies?
  5. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he agree with First NZ Capital that there is a 25 to 30 percent chance of New Zealand going into a recession in the next 12 months?
  6. IAN McKELVIE to the Minister for Primary Industries: How is the Government supporting growth in the seafood industry?
  7. Dr RUSSEL NORMAN to the Minister of Trade: Will the New Zealand Parliament be able to modify the text of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement if the Government signs the TPPA; and is it Parliament or Cabinet that ratifies the TPPA?
  8. KELVIN DAVIS to the Minister of Corrections: Have any cases, other than the one he mentioned in Oral Question No 7 yesterday, been identified of Mt Eden Corrections Facility guards giving sparring prisoners “coaching on their technique”?
  9. JACQUI DEAN to the Minister for Social Development: What reports has she received on Government initiatives to support young people into employment?
  10. DARROCH BALL to the Minister for Social Development: Does she stand by all her statements?
  11. ALFRED NGARO to the Minister of Transport: What recent reports has he received on progress on the Government’s Accelerated Auckland roading programme?
  12. JACINDA ARDERN to the Minister for Social Development: How many people who have made claims with the Historic Claims Team are still waiting for a response from the Ministry of Social Development, and of those, what is the longest period a claimant has waited?

National: Five questions on the economy, health system, seafood industry, youth employment and Auckland roading

Labour: Four questions on confidence in Housing Minister, recession,Mt Eden Prison and historic abuse claims

Greens: Two questions on Government policies and TPP

NZ First: One question on Minister of Social Development standing by her statements

General Debate 3.00 pm to 4.00 pm

The general debate is 12 speeches of up to five minutes each for a debate of an hour.

Members’ Bills 4.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

Parliament 25 August 2015

August 25th, 2015 at 12:31 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

1. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he have confidence in the Minister for Workplace Relations and Safety, given his decision not to include sheep, beef, and dairy farming in his Proposed Schedule of High Risk Industries?

2. JONO NAYLOR to the Minister of Finance: How is the New Zealand economy placed to be resilient to international economic fluctuations?

3. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Prime Minister: Can he tell us all again about the socalled Rock Star economy and his policies to maintain it?

4. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by his statement that “risks arising from Greece and China have receded somewhat and that there has been an improvement in the outlook for our trading partners.  That is positive for the New Zealand outlook”?

5. JAMES SHAW to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his Government’s policies?

6. TODD MULLER to the Minister of Transport: What update can he provide on the Tauranga Eastern Link, which is one of the Government’s Roads of National Significance?

7. KELVIN DAVIS to the Minister of Corrections: What was the date of the CCTV footage that led to a Serco staff member’s suspension for fighting an inmate at Mt Eden Corrections Facility?

8. TODD BARCLAY to the Minister for Primary Industries: What reports has he received on Government support for diversification in the dairy industry?

9. Dr RUSSEL NORMAN to the Minister of Trade: Which stakeholder groups have been briefed as to the draft content of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement since the completion of the last round of negotiations in July; and which groups have been briefed as to the process going forward for the agreement?

10. BARBARA KURIGER to the Minister of Health: Can he confirm that the health target for emergency departments has been met for the second consecutive quarter, meaning that 95 per cent of people attending our emergency departments are treated, admitted, or discharged within six hours?

11. Hon DAVID PARKER to the Minister of Foreign Affairs: Did he approve officials’ recommendation on 19 April 2012 to commence work on “finding an appropriate mechanism to meet Al Khalaf’s concern for ‘compensation’ (possibly through the joint venture)”; and was the $4m payment to Al Khalaf the adopted mechanism, given Cabinet noted part of that payment was for “the settlement of the long-running dispute”?

12. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by all his statements; if so, why?

National: Four questions on the economy, roads, dairy industry and emergency departments

Labour: Four questions on workplace safety, the economy, Mt Eden Prison and the Saudi farm

Greens: One question on TPP

NZ First: Two questions on the economy and Finance Minister standing by his statements

1. POTO WILLIAMS to the Member in charge of the Parental Leave and Employment Protection (Six Months’ Paid Leave and Work Contact Hours) Amendment Bill: Why did she draft the Parental Leave and Employment Protection (Six Months’ Paid Leave and Work Contact Hours) Amendment Bill?

2. IAIN LEES-GALLOWAY to the Member in charge of the Parental Leave and Employment Protection (Six Months’ Paid Leave and Work Contact Hours) Amendment Bill: What indication of support has she received for putting forward the Parental Leave and Employment Protection (Six Months’ Paid Leave and Work Contact Hours) Amendment Bill?
Tuesday, 25 August 2015

3. POTO WILLIAMS to the Member in charge of the Social Workers Registration (Mandatory Registration) Amendment Bill: Why did she draft the Social Workers Registration (Mandatory Registration) Amendment Bill?

4. POTO WILLIAMS to the Member in charge of the Social Workers Registration (Mandatory Registration) Amendment Bill: What indications of support has she received for putting forward the Social Workers Registration (Mandatory Registration) Amendment Bill?

There are also four questions to members in charges of bills.

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

Health and Safety Reform Bill – committee stage continued

The Bill replaces the Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992 and the Machinery Act 1950 to reform New Zealand’s workplace health and safety system, following the work of the Independent Taskforce on Workplace Health and Safety and the Royal Commission on the Pike River Coal Mine tragedy.

  • Introduced March 2014
  • 1st reading: March 2014, passed unanimously
  • SC report: July 2015, passed with amendments by majority with Labour, Green and NZ First minority reports
  • 2nd reading: July 2015, passed 63 to 56 with Labour, Greens and NZ First against

There is no time limit for the committee stage but it is estimated to be a seven hour debate as the bill has six parts and preliminary provisions to debate. Three parts have been debated, so there are probably three to four hours remaining.

There are seven SOPs – two from the Minister Michael Woodhouse, three from Labour, one from the Greens and one from the Maori Party.

Employment Standards Legislation Bill – first reading

This bill promotes fairer and more productive workplaces by providing enhanced protections and benefits for both employers and employees through a number of improvements to the employment relations–employment standards legislative framework.

  • Introduced: August 2015

The first reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

 

 

Parliament 20 August 2015

August 20th, 2015 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. MARAMA FOX to the Minister of Education: Does the Minister agree that Māori boarding schools such as Turakina have produced a considerable number of Māori leaders and, if so, what is she doing to ensure the long-term sustainability of Māori boarding schools?
  2. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: If Government health expenditure has not kept up with all inflationary pressures, as he admitted three weeks ago, what impact has this shortfall had on patients?
  3. JAMI-LEE ROSS to the Minister of Finance: What recent reports has he received on the outlook for the New Zealand economy?
  4. JULIE ANNE GENTER to the Minister of Finance: Does the Thirty Year New Zealand Infrastructure Plan identify reduction of greenhouse gas pollution and adaption to climate change as key challenges for infrastructure planning over the next 30 years; if not, why not?
  5. STUART SMITH to the Minister for Primary Industries: What actions is the Government taking to strengthen biosecurity measures at the border?
  6. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: What State Owned Enterprises and Crown Entities were identified as having “specific opportunities” for “capital recycling” in the Treasury Report: Capital Investment, Recycling and the Fiscal Strategy dated 3 November 2014, and did he reject any of the specific opportunities identified by officials?
  7. TODD BARCLAY to the Minister of Tourism: What recent reports has he received about regional tourism growth?
  8. SUE MORONEY to the Minister for Workplace Relations and Safety: Why are dairy, sheep and beef farms not defined as high-risk workplaces requiring worker health and safety representation, when more than one-third of New Zealand’s workplace deaths in the past 5 years have happened in the agricultural sector?
  9. MELISSA LEE to the Minister of Health: Can he confirm that 3.5 million New Zealanders received a funded medicine in 2014/15, and that this is an increase of more than 100,000 compared with the previous year?
  10. STUART NASH to the Minister for Land Information: What is the actual dollar value of added investment that has come into New Zealand for development purposes that was promised by the 608 successful overseas purchasers of New Zealand sensitive land who promised the introduction into New Zealand of added investment for development purposes as part of their successful consent application?
  11. RON MARK to the Minister for Canterbury Earthquake Recovery: Does he stand by all his statements?
  12. Dr SHANE RETI to the Minister for Communications: Can she provide an update on the broadband deployment in the regions?

National: Five questions on the economy, biosecurity, tourism, medicines funding, abd broadband.

Labour: Four questions on health spending, capital recycling, workplace safety and foreign investment.

Greens: One questions on climate change.

NZ First: One questions on CERA Minister standing by his statements and confidence in Serco

Maori Party: One question on Maori boarding schools

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm

Health and Safety Reform Bill – committee stage continued

The Bill replaces the Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992 and the Machinery Act 1950 to reform New Zealand’s workplace health and safety system, following the work of the Independent Taskforce on Workplace Health and Safety and the Royal Commission on the Pike River Coal Mine tragedy.

  • Introduced March 2014
  • 1st reading: March 2014, passed unanimously
  • SC report: July 2015, passed with amendments by majority with Labour, Green and NZ First minority reports
  • 2nd reading: July 2015, passed 63 to 56 with Labour, Greens and NZ First against

There is no time limit for the committee stage but it is estimated to be a seven hour debate as the bill has six parts and preliminary provisions to debate. Two parts have been debates, so there are probably four to five hours remaining.

There are seven SOPs – two from the Minister Michael Woodhouse, three from Labour, one from the Greens and one from the Maori Party.

Taxation (Transformation: First Phase Simplification and Other Measures) Bill – first reading

The bill amends several statutes relating to taxation in order to facilitate easier communication with Inland Revenue, simplify tax rules and provide for the sharing of information.

  • Introduced: June 2015

The first reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

 

Parliament 19 August 2015

August 19th, 2015 at 11:52 am by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. CHRIS BISHOP to the Minister of Finance: How does the Government’s fiscal strategy support the New Zealand economy?
  2. JAMES SHAW to the Prime Minister: Will he stand down Hon Murray McCully as Minister of Foreign Affairs while the Auditor-General investigates the Saudi Arabia Food Security Partnership; if not, why not?
  3. ANDREW LITTLE to the Associate Minister of Finance: Does she stand by the Prime Minister’s statement that “I’d hate to see New Zealanders as tenants in their own country”; if so, how many applications by overseas investors to buy land were declined under the Overseas Investment Act 2005 between January 2012 and June 2015?
  4. KANWALJIT SINGH BAKSHI to the Minister for Economic Development: What reports has he received on the growth of New Zealand’s technology software and services industry over the last seven years?
  5. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Did he approve the recommendations in the Treasury Report: Capital Investment, Recycling and the Fiscal Strategy, and if so, what priorities for capital recycling within the commercial portfolio did he indicate to officials?
  6. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  7. STEFFAN BROWNING to the Minister for Primary Industries: Will he reinstate the Organics Advisory Programme given the value of organic whole milk powder is more than five times that of conventionally-produced whole milk powder, and his vision for “premium, value-added products”?
  8. TODD MULLER to the Minister for Primary Industries: What reports has he received on growth in the wine industry?
  9. PHIL TWYFORD to the Minister responsible for HNZC: How much has Housing New Zealand spent in total on consultants and contractors for work related to selling state houses as part of the Government’s social housing reforms?
  10. MAHESH BINDRA to the Minister of Corrections: Does he have confidence in Serco?
  11. SARAH DOWIE to the Minister of Revenue: What recent announcements has he made on proposals to improve the collection of GST on services, intangibles, and goods?
  12. Hon DAVID PARKER to the Minister of Foreign Affairs: Does he stand by his statement that “The Government is comfortable with the process that was followed in relation to the Agrihub”; if so, did his department follow all Government rules during the development and procurement of the $6 million Agrihub?

National: Four questions on the economy, technology sector, wine industry and online GST

Labour: Four questions on foreign investment, capital recycling, state house sales and the Saudi Arabia farm.

Greens: Two questions on the Saudia Arabia farm and organics

NZ First: Two questions on PM standing by his statements and confidence in Serco

There is also one question to a member:

  1. JAMES SHAW to the Member in charge of the Electricity Industry (Small-Scale Renewable Distributed Generation) Amendment Bill: What is the intention of the Electricity Industry (Small-Scale Renewable Distributed Generation) Amendment Bill?

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

Health Practitioners (Replacement of Statutory References to Medical Practitioners) Bill – first reading continued

The Bill is an omnibus Bill amending 7 statutes to increase the range of functions that can be performed by health practitioners under those statutes by changing certain references to medical practitioners to references to health practitioners.

  • Introduced June 2015

The first reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours. There is part of one speech to go.

Health and Safety Reform Bill – committee stage

The Bill replaces the Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992 and the Machinery Act 1950 to reform New Zealand’s workplace health and safety system, following the work of the Independent Taskforce on Workplace Health and Safety and the Royal Commission on the Pike River Coal Mine tragedy.

  • Introduced March 2014
  • 1st reading: March 2014, passed unanimously
  • SC report: July 2015, passed with amendments by majority with Labour, Green and NZ First minority reports
  • 2nd reading: July 2015, passed 63 to 56 with Labour, Greens and NZ First against

There is no time limit for the committee stage but it is estimated to be a seven hour debate as the bill has six parts and preliminary provisions to debate.

There are seven SOPs – two from the Minister Michael Woodhouse, three from Labour, one from the Greens and one from the Maori Party.

Taxation (Transformation: First Phase Simplification and Other Measures) Bill – first reading

The bill amends several statutes relating to taxation in order to facilitate easier communication with Inland Revenue, simplify tax rules and provide for the sharing of information.

  • Introduced: June 2015

The first reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

 

Three new members’ bills

August 14th, 2015 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

Three bills were drawn from the ballot yesterday. They are:

Affordable Healthcare Bill by NZ First MP Barbara Stewart

The bill’s purpose is to encourage people to contribute to their own healthcare costs in a way that is consistent with supporting the public health system. It also makes health insurance a requirement for Parent Category visa applications. It proposes to require Parent Category migrants to have health insurance on arrival and to maintain it in New Zealand for 10 years; remove fringe benefit tax (FBT) from health insurance; and introduce the SuperGold health insurance premium rebate.

Electricity Industry (Small-Scale Renewable Distributed Generation) Amendment Bill by Green MP Gareth Hughes

This bill is intended to break down existing barriers and provide a fair regime for small-scale renewable electricity generators to encourage greater renewable distributed generation and to help New Zealand in meeting the goal of 90% renewable electricity by 2025.

Keep Kiwibank Bill by Labour MP Clayton Cosgrove

This purpose of this bill is to ensure that any proposal to partly or wholly privatise Kiwibank would require the support of 75% of all members of the House of Representatives or, alternatively, the support of a majority of voters in a referendum, in order to lawfully proceed.

 

Barbara Stewart’s bill has a mixture of good and bad. I think one can have a useful debate about who meets health costs of migrants who come in as parents of residents. Removing FBT from health insurance is a daft idea that will just lead to huge tax avoidance and the health premium rebate would be very costly to taxpayers. Overall I’d vote against this bill. If it was just the first part, I’d vote for it at first reading.

Gareth Hughes’ bill seems worth supporting at first reading. I’m not sure it will achieve a lot, but it looks like it could help solve a problem, without large unintended consequences. Not sure if it will be worth supporting all the way through, but at a minimum it deserves to go to select committee and have submissions on it. One of the more thoughtful opposition bills.

Clayton Cosgrove’s bill is a piece of ridiculous grandstanding that should be terminated on sight. It solves a non-existent problem with a constitutionally repugnant solution.

Parliament 13 August 2015

August 13th, 2015 at 1:15 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. Dr RUSSEL NORMAN to the Minister of Trade: Does he stand by his statement that the $6.2 billion investor-state dispute settlement action initiated by the Swedish power company Vattenfall, “is not, in fact, an attempt by the company to stop a democratically elected German Government from shifting its policy on nuclear power; it is about the financial implications of that decision”; if so, why?
  2. DAVID BENNETT to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received on the resilience of the New Zealand economy?
  3. IAIN LEES-GALLOWAY to the Minister for Workplace Relations and Safety: Will all New Zealand workers have the right to have a health and safety representative when they request one, under the Health and Safety Reform Bill?
  4. Dr PARMJEET PARMAR to the Minister for Economic Development: What is the Government doing to encourage more investment throughout New Zealand?
  5. Hon DAVID PARKER to the Minister of Foreign Affairs: When the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade stated on 19 April 2012 that they were “finding an appropriate mechanism to meet Al Khalaf’s concern for ‘compensation’ (possibly through the joint venture)”, did ‘compensation’ mean compensation or have some other meaning like “not compensation”?
  6. MARK MITCHELL to the Minister of Trade: What is the Government doing to reduce, what some commentators are saying is, an overdependence on trade with China?
  7. Hon CLAYTON COSGROVE to the Minister for State Owned Enterprises: What was Solid Energy’s debt in 2008/09 and what was it in the latest annual report?
  8. CLAYTON MITCHELL to the Minister of Broadcasting: Does she stand by all her statements?
  9. BRETT HUDSON to the Minister of Energy and Resources: What recent reports has he received on energy trends and growth in New Zealand?
  10. STUART NASH to the Minister for Land Information: Has she received information from the Overseas Investment Office which confirms the statement of the Minister of Economic Development that “We have not been as effective as other countries in ensuring that overseas investment into New Zealand has provided the additional benefits”?
  11. JAN LOGIE to the Minister for Social Development: What actions, if any, has the Ministry of Social Development taken to ensure the wellbeing of children in families subjected to benefit sanctions, given that sanctions of sole parents have increased by 19.98 percent in the last year?
  12. TODD BARCLAY to the Minister for Food Safety: What announcements has the Government made that will help our primary sector have greater access to the latest technologies and agricultural products?

National: Five questions on the economy, investment, trade with China, energy and primary sector

Labour: Four questions on workplace safety, the Saudi Arabia farm, Solid Energy and overseas investment

Greens: Two questions on TPP and welfare sanctions

NZ First: One question on Minister of Broadcasting standing by her statements

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm

Appropriation (2015/16 Estimates) Bill – committee stage continued

This Bill authorises the individual appropriations contained in The Estimates of Appropriations for the Government of New Zealand for the year ending 30 June 2016.

  • Introduced May 2015
  • 1st reading: May 2015, passed without dissent
  • 2nd reading: June 2015, passed 63-58 with Labour, Greens, NZ First against

The debate is an 11 hour debate divided into ten sector debates. The sectors are:

  • Economic Development and Infrastructure Sector – done
  • Education Sector – done
  • Environment Sector – done
  • External Sector – done
  • Finance and Government Administration Sector – done
  • Health Sector – done
  • Justice Sector – done
  • Māori, Other Populations and Cultural Sector – done
  • Primary Sector – done
  • Social Development and Housing Sector – current

Each debate is a minimum of eight speeches of up to five minutes each, led off by the relevant select committee chairperson.

Members’ bills ballot, Thursday 13 August 2015

August 13th, 2015 at 10:00 am by David Farrar

With three members’ bills yesterday completing their first readings, that means another three get drawn from the ballot today. Those in the ballot as of late last night are:

 

dd

Bill Title Member Name
1 Accident Compensation (Recent Migrants and Returning New Zealanders) Amendment Bill Melissa Lee
2 Affordable Healthcare Bill Barbara Stewart
3 Age of Majority (Attainment at 18 Years) Amendment Bill Brett Hudson
4 Better Public Service Target Results Independent Audit Bill Darroch Ball
5 Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill Dr Jian Yang
6 Buy New Zealand (Procurement) Bill Richard Prosser
7 Charter Schools (Application of Official Information and Ombudsmen Acts) Bill Hon Nanaia Mahuta
8 Child Poverty Reduction and Eradication Bill Jacinda Ardern
9 Children, Young Persons, and Their Families (Parent’s and Guardian’s Responsibility) Amendment Bill Barbara Kuriger
10 Climate Change (Divestment from Fossil Fuels) Bill Dr Russel Norman
11 Commerce (Supermarket Adjudicator and Code of Conduct) Amendment Bill Mojo Mathers
12 Credit Contracts and Consumer Finance (Break Fees Disclosure) Amendment Bill Kanwaljit Singh Bakshi
13 Credit Reforms (Responsible Lending) Bill Kris Faafoi
14 Crimes (Corporate Manslaughter) Amendment Bill Hon Damien O’Connor
15 Crimes (Non-fatal Strangulation) Amendment Bill Kelvin Davis
16 Criminal Procedure (Removing Paedophile Name Suppression) Amendment Bill Pita Paraone
17 Crown Minerals (Protection of World Heritage Sites) Amendment Bill Hon Ruth Dyson
18 Customs and Excise (Prohibition of Imports Made by Slave Labour) Amendment Bill Peeni Henare
19 Domestic Violence—Victims’ Protection Bill Jan Logie
20 Education (Charter Schools Abolition) Amendment Bill Chris Hipkins
21 Education (Charter Schools Teacher Quality) Amendment Bill Hon Phil Goff
22 Education (Public Good not Profit from Charter Schools) Amendment Bill Dr David Clark
23 Education (Restoration of Democracy to University Councils) Amendment Bill Hon David Cunliffe
24 Electricity Industry (Energy Efficiency) Amendment Bill Rino Tirikatene
25 Electricity Industry (Small-Scale Renewable Distributed Generation) Amendment Bill Gareth Hughes
26 Electricity Transparency Bill David Shearer
27 Employment Relations (Allowing Higher Earners to Contract Out of Personal Grievance Provisions) Amendment Bill Scott Simpson
28 Employment Relations (Certainty at Work) Amendment Bill Iain Lees-Galloway
29 Employment Relations (Restoring Kiwis’ Right to a Break at Work) Amendment Bill Jenny Salesa
30 Employment Relations (Triangular Employment) Amendment Bill Stuart Nash
31 Energy Efficiency and Conservation (Warm Healthy Rentals Warrant of Fitness) Amendment Bill Metiria Turei
32 Environment Canterbury (Democracy Restoration) Amendment Bill Dr Megan Woods
33 Family Proceedings (Paternity Orders and Parentage Tests) Amendment Bill Jacqui Dean
34 Healthy Homes Guarantee Bill (No 2) Andrew Little
35 Immigration (Refugee Quota) Amendment Bill Denise Roche
36 Independent Prison Inspectorate Bill David Clendon
37 International Non-Aggression and Lawful Use of Force (Implementation of Amendment to Statute of Rome) Bill Dr Kennedy Graham
38 Keep Kiwibank Bill Hon Clayton Cosgrove
39 Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary Establishment Bill Eugenie Sage
40 Kiwi Jobs Bill Sue Moroney
41 Land Transfer (Foreign Ownership of Land Register) Amendment Bill Mahesh Bindra
42 Land Transport (Tourist Driver Rental Vehicle) Amendment Bill Denis O’Rourke
43 Land Transport (Vulnerable Road Users) Amendment Bill Julie Anne Genter
44 Legislation (Climate Impact Disclosure Statement) Amendment Bill James Shaw
45 Life Jackets for Children and Young Persons Bill Alfred Ngaro
46 Local Government (Four Well-beings) Amendment Bill Su’a William Sio
47 Local Government (Freedom of Access) Amendment Bill Paul Foster-Bell
48 Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill Joanne Hayes
49 Nurse Practitioners Bill Hon Annette King
50 Oaths and Declarations (Endorsing the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi) Amendment Bill Marama Fox
51 Oaths and Declarations (Members of Parliament) Amendment Bill Meka Whaitiri
52 Overseas Investment (Protection of New Zealand Homebuyers) Amendment Bill Phil Twyford
53 Private International Law (Choice of Law in Tort) Bill David Bennett
54 Prostitution Reform (Regulate Street Prostitution) Amendment Bill Tracey Martin
55 Public Finance (Sustainable Development Indicators) Amendment Bill Steffan Browning
56 Public Works (Prohibition of Compulsory Acquisition of Māori Land) Amendment Bill Catherine Delahunty
57 Radiocommunications (Enhanced Public Broadcasting Provision) Amendment Bill Adrian Rurawhe
58 Receiverships (Agricultural Debt Mediation) Amendment Bill Ron Mark
59 Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Renewal of Licences) Amendment Bill Louisa Wall
60 Sentencing (Domestic Violence) Amendment Bill Poto Williams
61 Sentencing (Livestock Rustling) Amendment Bill Ian McKelvie
62 Shop Trading Hours Act Repeal (Shopping Centre Opening Hours) Amendment Bill Hon Trevor Mallard
63 Social Security (Apprenticeship Assistance for Youth) Amendment Bill Grant Robertson
64 Social Security (Pathway to Work) Amendment Bill Carmel Sepuloni
65 Social Security (Stopping Benefit Payments for Offenders who Repeatedly Fail to Comply with Community Sentences) Amendment Bill Mark Mitchell
66 Summary Offences (Drink or Drugs Affecting Behaviour) Amendment Bill Clayton Mitchell
67 Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Amendment Bill Clare Curran
68 Vulnerable Children (Mandatory Social Worker Registration) Amendment Bill Ria Bond
69 Waitemata Harbour Protection Bill Rt Hon Winston Peters
70 Wildlife (Threatened Species Protection) Amendment Bill Kevin Hague

The bills by party (Ministers excluded) are:

  • National – 13/34
  • Labour – 31/32
  • Greens – 14/14
  • NZ First -11/12
  • Maori – 1/1
  • ACT – 0/1

If the other 21 National MPs got a bill in the ballot (or could get agreement of the hierarchy for their bills) then the chances of a non hostile bill being drawn would increase from 13/70 to 34/91 or from 19% to 37%.

Parliament 12 August 2015

August 12th, 2015 at 1:17 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. SCOTT SIMPSON to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received on recent developments in the international economy, and how will these affect the New Zealand economy?
  2. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: If Government health expenditure has not kept up with all inflationary pressures as he admitted two weeks ago, what impact has this shortfall had on patients?
  3. DAVID SEYMOUR to the Minister for State Owned Enterprises: Is he happy with the financial returns the taxpayer is achieving from State-owned enterprises; if so, why?
  4. RON MARK to the Minister of Internal Affairs: Does he have confidence in his department?
  5. STUART SMITH to the Minister for Economic Development:What reports has he received on how New Zealand’s industries have diversified since 2008?
  6. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he have a “Plan B” for the New Zealand economy, as has been called for by ANZ Bank Chief Economist Cameron Bagrie, or is he satisfied with the prospect of rising unemployment, declining GDP growth and shockingly low business confidence as described by the Westpac Quarterly Economic Overview?
  7. METIRIA TUREI to the Minister in charge of the NZ Security Intelligence Service: Does he stand by the Prime Minister’s statement regarding the legislative framework of New Zealand’s intelligence agencies that “there are a range of deficiencies that they have identified”?
  8. ALFRED NGARO to the Minister of Justice: What recent announcements has she made regarding New Zealand’s domestic violence laws?
  9. PHIL TWYFORD to the Minister for Building and Housing: Does he agree with the Prime Minister that Aucklanders are getting wealthier because their house prices are going up?
  10. Dr RUSSEL NORMAN to the Minister of Trade: Does he have any concerns about the inclusion of investor-state dispute settlement provisions in the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement, provisions which allow multinational companies to sue governments in secretive offshore tribunals; if so, what are those concerns?
  11. JACQUI DEAN to the Minister for Primary Industries: What recent reports has he seen on growth in beef exports?
  12. Hon DAVID PARKER to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement today that Hon Murray McCully was saying “he didn’t want the lawyers brought in to be talking about compensation because the deal was never about compensation and he didn’t want lawyers going in there saying that”, given that Cabinet noted the “settlement for the long running dispute” was part of the purpose of the $4 million payment to a Saudi investor; if so, why?

National: Four questions on the economy x2, domestic violence and beef exports

Labour: Four questions on health spending, the economy, Auckland housing and the Saudi Arabia farm

Greens: Two questions on intelligence agencies and the TPP

NZ First: One question on Minister of Internal Affairs having confidence in his department

ACT: One question on SOEs

General Debate 3.00 pm to 4.00 pm

The general debate is 12 speeches of up to five minutes each for a debate of an hour.

Private Bills 4.00 pm to 5.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

 

Parliament 11 August 2015

August 11th, 2015 at 1:38 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. RON MARK to the Minister for Primary Industries: Does he stand by all his statements?
  2. TIM MACINDOE to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received on the outlook for the New Zealand economy?
  3. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement that New Zealand is on the “cusp of something special”; if so, was that “something special” rising unemployment along with plummeting dairy prices?
  4. ANDREW BAYLY to the Minister for Economic Development:What progress is the Government making in diversifying the New Zealand economy?
  5. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement that dairy prices are likely to be low for “a little bit longer”, given the latest auction was a record low?
  6. IAN McKELVIE to the Minister for Primary Industries: What reports has he received on the outlook for primary sector exports?
  7. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he agree with the Prime Minister that “Dairy is 5% of our economy. So yes dairy prices are down and it’s tough on those dairy farmers who are resilient people, but 95% of our economy is not involved in that”?
  8. DENISE ROCHE to the Minister for the Environment: Why has he announced a plastics recycling initiative rather than a levy when recycling will only maintain the volume of plastic in the waste stream, whereas a levy will reduce the number of plastic bags in circulation?
  9. BARBARA KURIGER to the Minister of Health: Can he confirm that the number of patients benefiting from elective surgery has increased by 5,030 in the last financial year, and that 49,234 more patients are having surgery now compared to 2007/2008?
  10. Hon DAVID PARKER to the Prime Minister: Did he chair the Cabinet on 18 February 2013 when Cabinet noted the initial $4m payment to a “Saudi investor”, and did he ask why Cabinet approval was not being sought?
  11. MELISSA LEE to the Minister of Education: What recent announcement has she made that supports the learning of Asian languages in schools?

National: Five questions on the economy x2, exports, electiver surgery and Asian languages

Labour: Four questions on the economy, dairy prices x2 and the Saudi Arabia farm

Greens: One question on plastic bags

NZ First: One question on Primary Industries Minister standing by his statements

There is one fewer question than normal. Presumably one of the minor parties failed to submit their question by the 10.30 am deadline.

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

New Zealand Flag Referendum Bill – committee stage continued

The Bill establishes a process for the holding of 2 postal referendums, firstly to determine which alternative flag design is preferred by voters, and secondly to determine whether that alternative flag or the current flag is to be the New Zealand flag.”

  • Introduced: March 2015
  • 1st reading: March 2015, passed 76 to 43 with Labour and NZ First opposed
  • SC report: June 2015, supported with amendments by the majority, Labour dissenting
  • 2nd reading: July 2015, passed 63 to 58 with Labour, Greens and NZ First opposed

There is no set time limit for the committee stage. Part 1 and Part 2 have passed so it is likely remaining debate will be an hour or so.

Appropriation (2015/16 Estimates) Bill – committee stage continued

This Bill authorises the individual appropriations contained in The Estimates of Appropriations for the Government of New Zealand for the year ending 30 June 2016.

  • Introduced May 2015
  • 1st reading: May 2015, passed without dissent
  • 2nd reading: June 2015, passed 63-58 with Labour, Greens, NZ First against

The debate is an 11 hour debate divided into ten sector debates. The sectors are:

  • Economic Development and Infrastructure Sector – done
  • Education Sector – done
  • Environment Sector – done
  • External Sector – done
  • Finance and Government Administration Sector – done
  • Health Sector – done
  • Justice Sector – current
  • Māori, Other Populations and Cultural Sector
  • Primary Sector
  • Social Development and Housing Sector

Each debate is a minimum of eight speeches of up to five minutes each, led off by the relevant select committee chairperson.

Parliament 30 July 2015

July 30th, 2015 at 11:40 am by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: In light of his admission yesterday that health funding has not kept up with all inflationary pressures under this Government, how will the health budget absorb the increased cost of purchasing medicines that the Prime Minister has said is likely to result from the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement?
  2. FLETCHER TABUTEAU to the Minister of Trade: Does he agree with the headlines in the Nikkei Asian Review, “Will TPP end with whimper like Doha Round?”, and in Gareth Morgan’s column, “Could the TPP become Key’s most embarrassing moment”?
  3. TODD BARCLAY to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received on the outlook for the New Zealand economy?
  4. PHIL TWYFORD to the Minister for Building and Housing: Does he stand by his statement that non-resident foreign buyers in the Auckland housing market are a non-event; if so, on what empirical data does he base that?
  5. PAUL FOSTER-BELL to the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment: What progress is the Government making in ensuring overseas-based New Zealanders repay their student loans?
  6. Dr RUSSEL NORMAN to the Minister of Trade: Has the New Zealand Government provided to other governments involved in the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations any documents regarding New Zealand’s position on specific issues in the negotiations; if so, have those documents been made publicly available to New Zealanders?
  7. CLAYTON MITCHELL to the Minister for Workplace Relations and Safety: Does he stand by his statement, “It’s important to strike the right balance between safe workplaces for workers and unnecessary red tape on businesses and I’m confident we have landed in the right space.”?
  8. Hon JUDITH COLLINS to the Minister of Education: What reports has she received on Trades Academies?
  9. JACINDA ARDERN to the Minister for Social Development: How much money has her Government spent developing and testing the ‘predictive risk model’ that was announced in 2012 to identify children at risk of harm and abuse, and in what year will it be rolled out?
  10. MARK MITCHELL to the Minister of Customs: How will the Government’s investment in next generation SmartGates increase security and ensure passengers are processed faster and more efficiently at the border?
  11. CATHERINE DELAHUNTY to the Minister of Education: Has she taken any papers to Cabinet proposing changes for charter schools; if so, is this an admission that the charter school model is not working?
  12. Hon DAVID PARKER to the Minister of Trade: Why did he say to journalists asking about the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement “we need adults to do this – not breathless children to run off at the mouth” and why does he think we should trust the Government to protect New Zealand’s interests when the Prime Minister has already admitted on TV that the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement may trade away New Zealand’s right to ban the sale of our homes to foreigners?

National: Four questions on the economy, student loans, trades academies and SmartGates

Labour: Four questions on health spending, Auckland housing, child abuse and TPP

Greens: Two questions on TPP and charter schools

NZ First: Two questions on TPP and workplace safety

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm 

Health and Safety Reform Bill – second reading

The Bill replaces the Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992 and the Machinery Act 1950 to reform New Zealand’s workplace health and safety system, following the work of the Independent Taskforce on Workplace Health and Safety and the Royal Commission on the Pike River Coal Mine tragedy.

  • Introduced March 2014
  • 1st reading: March 2014, passed unanimously
  • SC report: July 2015, passed with amendments by majority with Labour, Green and NZ First minority reports

The second reading is a debate of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes for a maximum debate of two hours.

Appropriation (2015/16 Estimates) Bill – committee stage continued

This Bill authorises the individual appropriations contained in The Estimates of Appropriations for the Government of New Zealand for the year ending 30 June 2016.

  • Introduced May 2015
  • 1st reading: May 2015, passed without dissent
  • 2nd reading: June 2015, passed 63-58 with Labour, Greens, NZ First against

The debate is an 11 hour debate divided into ten sector debates. The sectors are:

  • Economic Development and Infrastructure Sector – done
  • Education Sector – done
  • Environment Sector – done
  • External Sector – done
  • Finance and Government Administration Sector – done
  • Health Sector – current
  • Justice Sector
  • Māori, Other Populations and Cultural Sector
  • Primary Sector
  • Social Development and Housing Sector

Each debate is a minimum of eight speeches of up to five minutes each, led off by the relevant select committee chairperson.

Parliament 29 July 2015

July 29th, 2015 at 11:48 am by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. JAMI-LEE ROSS to the Minister of Finance: How has the New Zealand economy been affected by recent international economic developments?
  2. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement that “it is highly unlikely, actually, that the Government will have to pay any more through Pharmac. But on the basis that it had to pay a tiny bit more, the Government would fund that increase”?
  3. KEVIN HAGUE to the Minister of Health: What advice, if any, has he sought or received on threats to public health in New Zealand?
  4. Dr JIAN YANG to the Associate Minister of Education: What investment is the Government making in Auckland schools to manage growth?
  5. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  6. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: Has core Crown health expenditure kept up with health demographics and inflation growth since 2009/10?
  7. BRETT HUDSON to the Minister of Energy and Resources:What recent reports has he received on competition in the residential electricity market?
  8. CHRIS HIPKINS to the Minister of Education: Does she stand by her Government’s commitment that if partnership schools don’t succeed “the Government will be just as quick to close them down as we have been to establish them”; if so, how much taxpayer money is expected to be received by the Whangaruru partnership school between 28 May 2015, the date the Ministry recommended the termination of its contract, and 1 January 2016?
  9. TODD MULLER to the Minister for Building and Housing: What further progress has the Government made to deliver on its policy of delivering more houses in areas of need?
  10. KELVIN DAVIS to the Minister of Corrections: Does he stand by his answer during Oral Question No. 9 yesterday that “No, I have not received any reports” which contradict the official account of the number of attackers in the Littleton serious assault case?
  11. SARAH DOWIE to the Minister for Primary Industries: What recent reports has he received on the growth of the New Zealand horticulture industry?
  12. DARROCH BALL to the Minister for Social Development: Does she stand by all her statements?

National: Five questions on the economy, Auckland schools, electricity market, state housing and horticulture

Labour: Four questions on TPP, health spending, charter schools and Mt Eden Prison

Greens: One question on public health

NZ First: Two questions on PM standing by his statements and Anne Tolley standing by her statements

General Debate 3.00 pm to 4.00 pm

A general debate of 12 speech of up to five minutes for a maximum of an hour.

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

New Zealand Flag Referendum Bill – committee stage

The Bill establishes a process for the holding of 2 postal referendums, firstly to determine which alternative flag design is preferred by voters, and secondly to determine whether that alternative flag or the current flag is to be the New Zealand flag.”

  • Introduced: March 2015
  • 1st reading: March 2015, passed 76 to 43 with Labour and NZ First opposed
  • SC report: June 2015, supported with amendments by the majority, Labour dissenting
  • 2nd reading: July 2015, passed 63 to 58 with Labour, Greens and NZ First opposed

There is no set time limit for the committee stage. As the bill has three parts it is likely to be at least three hours.

Appropriation (2015/16 Estimates) Bill – committee stage continued

This Bill authorises the individual appropriations contained in The Estimates of Appropriations for the Government of New Zealand for the year ending 30 June 2016.

  • Introduced May 2015
  • 1st reading: May 2015, passed without dissent
  • 2nd reading: June 2015, passed 63-58 with Labour, Greens, NZ First against

The debate is an 11 hour debate divided into ten sector debates. The sectors are:

  • Economic Development and Infrastructure Sector – done
  • Education Sector – done
  • Environment Sector – done
  • External Sector – done
  • Finance and Government Administration Sector – done
  • Health Sector – current
  • Justice Sector
  • Māori, Other Populations and Cultural Sector
  • Primary Sector
  • Social Development and Housing Sector

Each debate is a minimum of eight speeches of up to five minutes each, led off by the relevant select committee chairperson.

Parliament 28 July 2015

July 28th, 2015 at 11:48 am by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement that “I don’t want to ban foreigners from buying residential property”?
  2. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  3. DAVID BENNETT to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received on the state of the New Zealand economy and what do these reports show?
  4. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: When was he or his office first briefed on the contents of the draft New Zealand Health Strategy?
  5. JAMES SHAW to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement that “New Zealand is never going to sign up to the TPP unless we believe it is in New Zealand’s best interests”?
  6. BARBARA KURIGER to the Minister for Social Housing: What work is being done to ensure social housing is available for those most in need?
  7. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by his reported statement that the slowdown in growth this year had come at the right time in the electoral cycle?
  8. DAVID CLENDON to the Minister of Corrections: How many Final Warning Notices, in accordance with SERCO’s contract with the Crown, have been issued since SERCO took over management of the Mt Eden Corrections Facility?
  9. KELVIN DAVIS to the Minister of Corrections: Does he agree with the statement made by the Department of Corrections Chief Executive Ray Smith that “not everything is broken” in relation to SERCO’s management of Mt Eden Corrections Facility?
  10. ALASTAIR SCOTT to the Minister of Immigration: What measures has the Government announced to help spread the benefits of migration across New Zealand?
  11. Hon DAVID PARKER to the Minister of Trade: Is the effect of Article 139 of the New Zealand–China Free Trade Agreement that it allows restrictions to be introduced on foreign buyers of New Zealand homes, including Chinese buyers, so long as subsequent agreements with other countries are no more generous?
  12. NUK KORAKO to the Minister of Education: He ahaērāmahiāwhinakiakahakēatu ai teako o tehungarangatahi i Te Reo Māori?
    • Translation: What is being done to help more young people learn Te Reo Māori?

National: Four questions on the economy, social housing, immigration and Te Reo Māori

Labour: Five questions on housing x 2, DHBs, Mt Eden Prison and economic growth

Greens: Two questions on TPP and Med Eden Prison

NZ First: One question on PM standing by his statements

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

New Zealand Flag Referendum Bill – second reading

The Bill establishes a process for the holding of 2 postal referendums, firstly to determine which alternative flag design is preferred by voters, and secondly to determine whether that alternative flag or the current flag is to be the New Zealand flag.”

  • Introduced: March 2015
  • 1st reading: March 2015, passed 76 to 43 with Labour and NZ First opposed
  • SC report: June 2015, supported with amendments by the majority, Labour dissenting

The second reading consists of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each for a maximum of two hours.

Appropriation (2015/16 Estimates) Bill – committee stage

This Bill authorises the individual appropriations contained in The Estimates of Appropriations for the Government of New Zealand for the year ending 30 June 2016.

  • Introduced May 2015
  • 1st reading: May 2015, passed without dissent
  • 2nd reading: June 2015, passed 63-58 with Labour, Greens, NZ First against

The debate is an 11 hour debate divided into ten sector debates. The sectors are:

  • Economic Development and Infrastructure Sector – done
  • Education Sector – done
  • Environment Sector – current
  • External Sector
  • Finance and Government Administration Sector
  • Health Sector
  • Justice Sector
  • Māori, Other Populations and Cultural Sector
  • Primary Sector
  • Social Development and Housing Sector

Each debate is a minimum of eight speeches of up to five minutes each, led off by the relevant select committee chairperson.

Parliament 23 July 2015

July 23rd, 2015 at 12:38 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. DAVID CLENDON to the Minister of Corrections: What specific events has he been made aware of at the SERCO-run Mt Eden Correctional Facility that could trigger a specific deduction from the performance-related fee, and which of those events have resulted in a specific deduction?
  2. KANWALJIT SINGH BAKSHI to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received on dairy prices and their effect on the New Zealand economy?
  3. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: Is he confident that the Government is adequately resourcing the public health workforce?
  4. GARETH HUGHES to the Minister for Climate Change Issues:Given criticisms that the carbon target he set is inadequate, will he set a more ambitious target ahead of the Paris climate negotiations in December?
  5. PAUL FOSTER-BELL to the Minister of Science and Innovation: How is the Government seeding more high-tech start-ups in the New Zealand economy?
  6. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he agree with the Reserve Bank Governor’s statement that “the growth outlook is now softer than at the time of the June Statement. Rebuild activity in Canterbury appears to have peaked, and the world price for New Zealand’s dairy exports has fallen sharply”?
  7. MARK MITCHELL to the Minister of Education: What reports has she received on education in regional New Zealand?
  8. PHIL TWYFORD to the Minister for Building and Housing: How does he intend to reduce the shortfall of Auckland houses in the next two years, given that under this Government the shortfall is increasing by 5000 a year, and the Productivity Commission predicts on current rates the shortfall – now 32,000 – will hit 60,000 by 2020?
  9. MATT DOOCEY to the Minister for Social Development: What is the Government doing to support people off benefits and into higher education?
  10. KELVIN DAVIS to the Minister of Corrections: Why did he state that he only learned about the practice of dropping this week, when he was directly told about it one month ago at select committee?
  11. JACQUI DEAN to the Minister of Tourism: What reports has he received on the progress on the New Zealand Cycle Trail?
  12. DARROCH BALL to the Minister for Social Development: Does she stand by all her statements in regard to the provision of social services?

National: Five questions on the economy, high tech start ups, regional educational, supporting people off benefits and the NZ cycle trail

Labour: Four questions on public health workforce, economic growth, Auckland housing and Mt Eden Prison

Greens: Two questions on Mt Eden Prison and climate change

NZ First: One question on Anne Tolley standing by her statements

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm

Social Security (Extension of Young Persons Services and Remedial Matters) Amendment Bill – first reading

The Bill amends the Social Security Act 1964 to extend the existing Youth Service to all 19-year-old beneficiaries with children, and 18- and 19-year-old beneficiaries without children who are considered at significant risk of long-term welfare dependency.

  • Introduced June 2015

The first reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

 

Health Practitioners (Replacement of Statutory References to Medical Practitioners) Bill – first reading

The Bill is an omnibus Bill amending 7 statutes to increase the range of functions that can be performed by health practitioners under those statutes by changing certain references to medical practitioners to references to health practitioners.

  • Introduced June 2015

The first reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

 

Results of Members’ bills ballot, Thursday 23 July 2015

July 23rd, 2015 at 12:31 pm by David Farrar

The four bills drawn are all from Labour MPs. They are:

  1. Parental Leave and Employment Protection (Six Months’ Paid Leave and Work Contact Hours) Amendment Bill Sue Moroney
  2. Education (Charter Schools Curriculum) Amendment Bill Hon Phil Goff
  3. Social Workers Registration (Mandatory Registration) Amendment Bill Carmel Sepuloni
  4. Official Information (Parliamentary Under-Secretaries) Amendment Bill Adrian Rurawhe

Parental Leave and Employment Protection (Six Months’ Paid Leave and Work Contact Hours) Amendment Bill

This bill extends paid parental leave to 26 weeks and adds provisions around work contact hours, where working parents are entitled to the flexibility of returning to work for a certain amount of time during the parental leave period without losing their entitlement to paid parental leave.

Note that the Government has already increased the duration of leave from 14 weeks to 18 weeks. This bill is unlikely to progress unless United Future support it.

Education (Charter Schools Curriculum) Amendment Bill

This Bill would requiring partnership schools kura hourua (“charter schools”) to teach the NZ curriculum.

This undermines the whole idea of charter schools having flexibility (like private schools) and is unlikely to be supported.

Social Workers Registration (Mandatory Registration) Amendment Bill

This Bill implements recommendations made to the Minister for Social Development by the Social Workers Registration Board to provide for the current voluntary system of registration for practising social workers to become a mandatory system.

I think this bill is worth supporting at least through first reading.

Official Information (Parliamentary Under-Secretaries) Amendment Bill

This Bill would ensure that information held by Parliamentary Under-Secretaries in their official capacity is official information, and subject to the Official Information Act 1982.

I support this bill and think it should be passed.