A Competition

August 8th, 2006 at 2:44 pm by David Farrar

Don Brash has said that “Helen Clark’s Labour Government is quite simply the most corrupt government in New Zealand history”.

Now I was thinking this might be a bit too harsh. I mean they might only be the second most corrupt over 150 years? What misdeeds have been done in the deep dark past.

So I thought why not a competition. Nominate other past corrupt Governments. This has to be more than wah wah didn’t like their policies or they did not keep their promises. It needs to be as good as covering up MPs having immigrants as unpaid labour, refusing to pay back money, deliberate breaches of electoral law etc.

This is a great chance for all the historians out there to shine.

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714 Responses to “A Competition”

  1. noddy () says:

    What a truely excellent wheeze. I’ll start the ball rolling with corrupt wannabes shall I?

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/section/story.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10344755

    Is Blumsky still accepting those used $20 bills in brown paper bags by the way?

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  2. phil u () says:

    i’d nominate the golden years of national…

    the holyoake years…

    the whole system was a totally corrupt mates rates/backscratching group of mimi-monopolies and mini-cartels that controlled virtually everything we did or bought….

    c.f….the import licence scams…

    new zealand then was definitely a matter of who you knew..not what you knew..

    and therefor…totally corrupt…

    (and we haven’t even gone near the vietnam war..the racist tours..etc..etc..)

    so…holyoake it is..’kiwi keith’..

    (oh..he was also able to perform an astounding physical feat….to have his lips firmly attached to the butts of both britain and america…at the same time..!..)

    a man of undoubted lip-agility..’our keith’…

    oh..!..and such unbound arrogance..you could have bottled it..

    phil(whoar.co.nz)

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  3. Ross Miller () says:

    Hmmmmmmmmmm. How about a certain Government of which ‘Dear Leader’ was a member selling off two French Agents for $500,000 after telling all and sundry thay were not for sale and the law must take its course.

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  4. rightkiwi () says:

    Muldoon is the only one that comes close, but still well behind, this one in the corruption stakes.

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  5. Graeme Edgeler () says:

    You do have Muldoon’s usurpation of Parliament (Fitzgerald v Muldoon), I suppose.

    Is that akin to Clark’s alleged usurpation of Parliament’s appropriations?

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  6. Peter Metcalfe () says:

    Sir Joh Bjekle-Petersen.

    Any government in Nigeria.

    Tony Blair (from Bernie Ecclestone’s formula 1 to the current peerage for loans).

    Jacques Chirac.

    Mulroney.

    Jean Chretien.

    Boris Yeltsin.

    Leonid Brezhnev (his son-in-law took a huge bribe from the central asian SSRs so they could set their own policy).

    Suharto.

    Chun Doo Hwan, Roh Tae Roh and Kim Yong Sam. Probably Park also.

    Clinton.

    Mobuto (of Zaire).

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  7. llew () says:

    Does it have to be true? I mean, are we concerned about libel?

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  8. tim barclay () says:

    Depends on how you define corruption. All Governments arrogantly abuse power and if that is your definition then Muldoon was the worst. But taking public money and spending it brazenly on party advertising is blatant corruption. The wet bus treatment of Philip Field is blatant corruption. The double standard of observance of the Law and the interference with the process of justice and yes that is corrupt. And of course all the other petty stuff like blatant political appointments but they all do that. Has she personally benefited – no, she has not, but the pledge card money is a serious misuse of public money probably the worst of any Government.

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  9. burt () says:

    Tim said “… Has she personally benefited – no, she has not … “/i>

    I disagree Tim, If she had been pinged for the pledge card after ’99 she might not be PM today. Massive personal benefit if you ask me.

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  10. gd () says:

    Tim is right For those of us who have been around a while the contrast today is the defiant and arrogant attitudes of politicans and the craven compliance of senior public servants.The perception is that the civil servants havent the guts to stand up to the pollies and find every which way they can to do their bidding.Once the public service was independent of the government but over the years this has changed.There is a large gap opening up between what the public expect as to the morals and ethics of pollies and civil servants and the reality. Clark refuses to consider a Code of Conduct and Ethics for pollies yet they are probably the group in our society that most needs this check and control.These two faced arseholes tell us what to do but refuse to do it themselves.

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  11. dave () says:

    I agree with Brash, the economy aside this is the most corrupt – and Muldoon’s government is second

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  12. GPT () says:

    Last Labour govt – managed to hide the fact that the BNZ was falling apart and the country effectively bankrupt until they could lose the election. Still pretty cunning politically – people only seem to remember National having to break promises to pay for the Labour mess.

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  13. dave () says:

    being cunning and being corupt are completely different. Anyway, wasnt the BNZ also bailed out in the 50’s or thereabouts?

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  14. dave () says:

    being cunning and being corupt are completely different. Anyway, wasnt the BNZ also bailed out in the 50’s or thereabouts?

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  15. dave () says:

    being cunning and being corupt are completely different. Anyway, wasnt the BNZ also bailed out in the 50’s or thereabouts?

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  16. Gaz () says:

    Hmmm, if you ignore phil there are three schools of thought here. One is that the current government is the most corrupt (my preference, there is no precedent for the sort of crap we are seeing in the past), the second that Lange’s government was more corrupt (I disagree with that, it was one of the most open governments ever except for perhaps Bolgers) and the third is Muldoon’s government.
    Perhaps the cold war secrecy of the past has hidden such corruption, but I think that these would have come out in the end, and they haven’t.
    I also think that it is interesting that nobody is talking about the “failed government of the ’90s.” Perhaps because the fourth National government was one of the best governments we have ever had.

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  17. nissan () says:

    In my time ; imported cars with false speedo’s
    and ACC’s use of ‘policy’ not law.
    Both have been supported by all Politician.

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  18. nissan () says:

    In my time ; imported cars with false speedo’s
    and ACC’s use of ‘policy’ not law.
    Both have been supported by all Politician.

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  19. Grant McLachlan () says:

    Without a doubt the most corrupt government in New Zealand’s history was the Hall Government of 1879-1882. During the period leading up to an election (and while the Governor was abroad) legislation was hastily passed which gave power to the Native Minister to sack the Parihaka township.

    The Native Minister, John Bryce, dressed up in full military garb and mounting a white horse, led a march of militia down the main street of Wanganui in an election rally cheered on by hundreds.

    After the election, with the promise of confiscated land to settlers, Bryce won a clear majority.

    The 1881 election was the first election where there was one man, one vote. Upto then, only Maori had one man, one vote but could only vote in the Maori seats.

    Bryce’s most outspoken opponent, elected in the 1881 election, was one Thomas Bracken who wrote the following poem:

    Men of every creed and race
    Gather here before thy face
    Asking thee to bless this place
    God defend our Freeland.
    From dissension, envy, hate
    And corruption guard our state
    Make this country good and great
    God Defend New Zealand.

    Makes you think, dunnit?

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  20. Don () says:

    The early days of Vogel were pretty shocking.

    Tony Simpson has written some great stories.

    See “Shame and Disgrace: A history of lost scandals in New Zealand” if you can find it.

    Don

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  21. toby1845 () says:

    The most corrupt government in our history was the Seddon Government. It was riddled with nepotism and cronyism – last look at the Cabinet appointments and senior public sector appointments that he made.

    The second most corrupt is clearly the Clark Government.

    As for the rubbish above about Muldoon – humbug! You can accuse him of many things, but corruption isn’t one of them.

    As for Tony Simpson – yes, he has written some great stories…..ripping yarns, almost.

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  22. Chris Brazendale () says:

    Have to be the Reagan years in America. The Iran-Contras scandal tells you everything you need to know about US foreign policy, then and now.

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  23. Chris Brazendale () says:

    Have to be the Reagan years in America. The Iran-Contras scandal tells you everything you need to know about US foreign policy, then and now.

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  24. Chris Brazendale () says:

    The Reagan administration in the US. The Iran-Contras scandal tells you everything you need to know about US foreign policy, then and now.

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  25. culma () says:

    Clarks present Govt “WINS” hands down, in the present age of multimedia coverage and scrutiny, (often at times prying), Clark’s mob have gone on a rampage second to none.

    Last evening on eye to eye she justified Phillip Fields antics and her own dishonesty as no worse than the actions of Nick Smiths contempt of court charge, and Gerry Brownlee’s stair barging incident. Sorry not defending either Smith or Brownlee, but how do these charges even come close?

    After forcing myself to witness each word I come away with my statement above, Clarks mob definitely wins hands down.

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  26. Don Brash () says:

    It looks as though I may have to withdraw my earlier claim that the Clark Labour Government is the most corrupt government in New Zealand history.

    The historians of Kiwiblog point out that there were some very dodgy goings on in the first Vogel Ministry from 1873–1875, the Hall Government of 1879-1882 was also pretty suspect, and the Seddon Ministry of 1893-1906 was apparently riddled with nepotism and cronyism.

    So while it is far from proven that these governments were anywhere near as corrupt as Helen Clark’s, I should nevertheless apologise to the prime minister and rephrase my claim to: “The Clark Labour Government is the most corrupt government in the last hundred years.”

    Don Brash

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  27. phil u () says:

    um..don…you forgot the mini-cartels/monopolies of the holyoake govt…?

    and..um..err..you forgot the ‘dull-moon’ years…weren’t they choice..eh..?

    and just while i’ve got your attention…

    when d’yareckonn you’ll be packing your kit..and hitting the road…?..eh..?…

    (and can i have the ‘scoop’..?..)

    phil(whoar.co.nz)

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  28. phil u () says:

    b.t.w…don…on behalf of me…can i welcome you to the blog world…please continue…

    (and have a word to a few of the other party leaders…eh..?…and tell them they should get their butts over here..(and other places..)

    you/they may find direct debate/conversation rewarding on all sorts of levels..eh..?

    (b.t.w…shortly my mini-media-empirette will be seeking in-depth interviews soon..

    i’ll get my people..(ahem..that’s me..and the dogs..eh..?)..to call your people..eh..?

    i’ll see you then…

    phil(whoar.co.nz)

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  29. larry quiche () says:

    This is all very amusing but I’ve got a couple of questions:

    1. This Field thing is apalling but do you really think a National Government would do the right thing given similar circumstances?

    2. Does one bad apple make the whole Government corrupt? I don’t think so, even bearing in mind the fudging the PM is doing every day.

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  30. larry quiche () says:

    This is all very amusing but I’ve got a couple of questions:

    1. This Field thing is apalling but do you really think a National Government would do the right thing given similar circumstances?

    2. Does one bad apple make the whole Government corrupt? I don’t think so, even bearing in mind the fudging the PM is doing every day.

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  31. Redbaiter () says:

    Never apologize to the immoral unprincipled left Don.

    1) They’ll use it against you rather than see it (as you do), as the ‘decent’ thing to do.

    2) Ever see them apologizing?

    3) [Deleted by DPF]

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  32. phil u () says:

    um..redbaiter…i can’t actually see where anyone asked him to apologise..?

    and what for..?..being a tory..?

    (he can’t help it..eh..?..we can see/understand that..red/b..he dosen’t have to apolgise for being who/what he is…)

    or are you just parallel-universing/frothing again..?..redbaiter.?

    phil(whoar.co.nz)

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  33. Redbaiter () says:

    If it really is Don Brash, then I think it is wonderful that such a senior politician has the courage and transparent honesty to express himself on a blog. Would Helen Klark ever be so ready to interact with the plebs???? What a shame tho that Don’s efforts have to be followed up by the idiotic and disrespectful ramblings of Phil U.

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  34. Michael (The Right Wing One) () says:

    Larry – If it was only one bad apple we’d be alright:

    Before Field, we had the Pledge Cards,
    Before the Pledge Cards, we had speed-gate.
    Before Speedgate, we had the Guinea Pig memo.
    Before Guinea Pigs, we had Painter-gate.
    Before Paintergate, we had Bathgate-gate.
    Before Bathgate-gate, we had Yelash-gate.
    Before Yelash-gate, one Labour Minister and one Alliance Minister got caught claiming expenses they weren’t entitled to – the Alliance Minister was fired but the Labour Minister was reinstated.
    And right back at the start we learnt that a Labour Minister and got a teenager her pregnant – when an opposition MP privately took the matter up with Clark for investigation, she revealed it to the media to get rid of him.

    (I’m sure others can add more)

    On the right, I remember John Delamare being dismissed as Minister of Immigration by Shipley for conflict of interest immediately prior to the 99 election. National MP Michael Laws resigning after admitting he forged a signature on an official form. Donna Awatere-Huata being expelled from ACT for lying in caucus.

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  35. culma () says:

    The country will dictate if Don Brash ends up as the next PM.
    I respect him for one reason, he fronts those that will be affected by National party policy, “Face to Face” this isn’t the type of pandering we see from career politicians such as Clark.
    only criticism, when you have a rabid dog attacks, Don pick up a large stick and put it down. I am referring to the leaders debate of the last election.
    Your respect of the position of prime minister was gallant but wasted.
    My view above still stands, Helen Clark’s Govt gets my vote as the most deceptively devious to grace these shores.
    Something no doubt she is obviously quite proud of!

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  36. icehawk () says:

    As a leftie I agree that we’ve a problem with a the dishonesty and corruption we’re seeing in this Labour govt. And we need to take a stand on this sort of crap. Otherwise we’ll slide downhill and end up with the kind of corrupt govt that the USA has – and god knows we don’t want that.

    When I lived in the US I tried to explain to my friends about the Tuku Morgan scandal, which was going on then.

    Y’see he took a clothing allowance he shouldn’t have and spent a few thousand…

    “Thousands?” The yanks would ask. “Thousands?”

    Then they’d laugh, and laugh, and laugh.

    They’d point out the local governor, whose son received a ten-million dollar consulting contract from a company the day after the governor struck down environmental laws saving that company a hundred million.

    They’d point out that almost a billion US dollars was spend in the last US presidential campaign – and that the donors wanted something for their money.

    They’d show me photos of guys wandering around the floor of the US congress with bags of wadges of 100-dollar bills, handing them to senators who were voting the right way.

    They’d point to the son of President Bush Sr and the amazing way his failed oil company got bought out for tens of millions, and his football team got given a 50-million dollar stadium by the local city govt.

    Once corruption becomes entrenched it becomes normal. That’s why the USA is so screwed: people stop fighting it because they look at politicians and say “they all do it”.

    Zero tolerance is the only solution.

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  37. icehawk () says:

    As a leftie I agree that we’ve a problem with a the dishonesty and corruption we’re seeing in this Labour govt. And we need to take a stand on this sort of crap. Otherwise we’ll slide downhill and end up with the kind of corrupt govt that the USA has – and god knows we don’t want that.

    When I lived in the US I tried to explain to my friends about the Tuku Morgan scandal, which was going on then.

    Y’see he took a clothing allowance he shouldn’t have and spent a few thousand…

    “Thousands?” The yanks would ask. “Thousands?”

    Then they’d laugh, and laugh, and laugh.

    They’d point out the local governor, whose son received a ten-million dollar consulting contract from a company the day after the governor struck down environmental laws saving that company a hundred million.

    They’d point out that almost a billion US dollars was spend in the last US presidential campaign – and that the donors wanted something for their money.

    They’d show me photos of guys wandering around the floor of the US congress with bags of wadges of 100-dollar bills, handing them to senators who were voting the right way.

    They’d point to the son of President Bush Sr and the amazing way his failed oil company got bought out for tens of millions, and his football team got given a 50-million dollar stadium by the local city govt.

    Once corruption becomes entrenched it becomes normal. That’s why the USA is so screwed: people stop fighting it because they look at politicians and say “they all do it”.

    Zero tolerance is the only solution.

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  38. icehawk () says:

    As a leftie I agree that we’ve a problem with a the dishonesty and corruption we’re seeing in this Labour govt. And we need to take a stand on this sort of crap. Otherwise we’ll slide downhill and end up with the kind of corrupt govt that the USA has – and god knows we don’t want that.

    When I lived in the US I tried to explain to my friends about the Tuku Morgan scandal, which was going on then.

    Y’see he took a clothing allowance he shouldn’t have and spent a few thousand…

    “Thousands?” The yanks would ask. “Thousands?”

    Then they’d laugh, and laugh, and laugh.

    They’d point out the local governor, whose son received a ten-million dollar consulting contract from a company the day after the governor struck down environmental laws saving that company a hundred million.

    They’d point out that almost a billion US dollars was spend in the last US presidential campaign – and that the donors wanted something for their money.

    They’d show me photos of guys wandering around the floor of the US congress with bags of wadges of 100-dollar bills, handing them to senators who were voting the right way.

    They’d point to the son of President Bush Sr and the amazing way his failed oil company got bought out for tens of millions, and his football team got given a 50-million dollar stadium by the local city govt.

    Once corruption becomes entrenched it becomes normal. That’s why the USA is so screwed: people stop fighting it because they look at politicians and say “they all do it”.

    Zero tolerance is the only solution.

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  39. icehawk () says:

    As a leftie I agree that we’ve a problem with a the dishonesty and corruption we’re seeing in this Labour govt. And we need to take a stand on this sort of crap. Otherwise we’ll slide downhill and end up with the kind of corrupt govt that the USA has – and god knows we don’t want that.

    When I lived in the US I tried to explain to my friends about the Tuku Morgan scandal, which was going on then.

    Y’see he took a clothing allowance he shouldn’t have and spent a few thousand…

    “Thousands?” The yanks would ask. “Thousands?”

    Then they’d laugh, and laugh, and laugh.

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  40. culma () says:

    icehawk – agree with the first sentence but what does acceptance of corruption in this country have to do with what the Yanks will put up with?

    This is the same lame response Helen Clark uses to justify blatant wrongdoing.
    We are supposed to be adults here and it is blatantly obvious that the attitude inside this Govt is pouring out into the public service, Police, Health etc. Sadly this will be the only legacy of this Govt, how long it will take to get moral standards in this country back to any sort of acceptable level.

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  41. Billy () says:

    phil…u…what…is…it..with..you..and..the…ellipsis?

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  42. Bearhunter () says:

    Oh God, you’ve got a long way to go here to even come close to the Fianna Fail-led administration in Ireland in the 80s/90s. Headed initially by a bloke (Charles J Haughey) who had been charged with gun-running to the IRA a mere decade earlier, levels of fraud, backhanders and downright theft escalated as everyone from the Taoiseach (PM) down stuck their hand in the till. There were the backhanders received by Haughey that allowed him to buy a helicopter business, a yacht and a friggin ISLAND, while wearing handmade shirts and telling everyone to tighten their belts. The money he received off supermarket magnate Ben Dunne was one brown bag of many, but at least led to teh t-shirt that said: Ben there Dunne that, bought the Taoiseach. An entire industry was sold off to cronies and it finally cost CJKH his job, along with many, many other pollies, it kick-started a decade-long investigative tribunals process and of course it meant that Ireland had even outstripped the Thatcher/Major Tory government in Britain for sheer duplicity, cronyism and graft. NZ is only trotting after Charley Haughey….

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  43. phil u () says:

    billy..it’s a personal campaign to end the tyranny of the capital letter…and to revive/nurture the use of the long-neglected ellipses…

    use of ellipses also allows the words to breath…eh..?

    and the aesthetics billy..the aesthetics…..

    (but you can see that..eh..?..)

    phil(whoar.co.nz

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  44. culma () says:

    Why don’t we just devide blue in one island red in the other? then you can put up with the level of corruption you want? Phil

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  45. Don Brash () says:

    Good questions Larry. My answers:

    Question 1: “This Field thing is apalling but do you really think a National Government would do the right thing given similar circumstances?”

    Absolutely we’d do the right thing. For an idea of what Labour and National do in similar circumstances, look no further than the issue of election overspending.

    Labour quite deliberately robbed the public of nearly $450,000, then tried to throw up a smokescreen that the rules were unclear.

    Read the rules – they’re crystal clear.

    Labour read the rules. They knew the rules. They even got a ruling on the rules. They were told in no uncertain terms that if they included the pledge card as election spending they would be breaking the rules.

    And they decided to break the rules anyway. Why? Because they thought Helen Clark had such a tight grip on all the levers of power that she could get away with it.

    Now contrast this with our breach. This was clearly an accident. The campaign director asked the media planner to book an amount of media. The campaign director thought he’d said “including GST”; the media planner thought she heard “plus GST”. In the business world, all media contracts are plus GST, so while I’m not defending the error you can see how it could happen.

    It was a silly mistake, which resulted in us using $100,000 more airtime than we were entitled to.

    Naturally we were embarrassed. We certainly knew we’d incur much teasing about the leader’s previous day job!

    But I’m proud to say we did the right thing. We acknowledged the mistake as soon as we realised it. We offered to pay the broadcasters immediately. Then we found we weren’t allowed to, so we went further than that – we tried to pass a law so we could pay them.

    This attempt is being blocked by other parties who care less about out-of-pocket TV and radio stations than about preventing National from getting any credit for doing the right thing.

    Contrast our action with Helen Clark’s reaction to being told what she already knew – that a taxpayer-funded pledge card was illegal. She wants to pass a law too – not so she can do the right thing, but so she doesn’t have to pay taxpayers back. She wants to pass a law to make what she knew was illegal, legal.

    Robert Mugabe would be proud of her.

    Question 2: “Does one bad apple make the whole Government corrupt? I don’t think so, even bearing in mind the fudging the PM is doing every day.”

    Larry, we’re talking about a whole orchard full of bad apples, with the most rotten of all being the prime minister. I don’t have time to list all the ‘-gates’ she has passed through en-route to the moral low ground, but I see many of them listed above.

    Yes, that makes her government corrupt.

    Larry, we badly need to debate which style of leadership we want in this country – the politics of bribery and corruption, or the politics of principle where you try to do the right thing for the country.

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  46. Jamie () says:

    “Robert Mugabe would be proud of her.”

    Jesus. Christ.

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  47. culma () says:

    Don Brash – can’t agree with the comment of the campaign directors foible of inclusive or plus gst.
    But I suppose $100k as opposed to $200 million because someone forgot to add steel bars to the windows of our new prisons is an ideal comparison. When the present Govt make a faupah they are usually doozies.

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  48. tim barclay () says:

    Helen Clark’s grip on the levers of Government is certainly impressive and has lead her to think she can do anything at all. For instance getting rid of a Police Commissioner very early in her premiership has given her great leverage over the Police and has given her the chance to do what she likes. Has there ever been a Government that has had so many brushes with the criminal law but time and again got let off by the Police. Did she know from the start she needed to fix the Police because her Government was always going to be dodgy.

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  49. Seanj () says:

    My Dearest Phil U,

    You just don’t get it do you, our favorite little welfare professional.

    As always, your lightweight commentary remains droll, and your cheap shots at people who succeed comes as no surprise.

    We understand Phil, the demoralisation that comes about when you chose to take money from those you clearly hate; we understand why you chose to smoke drugs to dull the pain of the reality that you cannot support your boy without the assistance of Dr. Brash and the rest of the tax payers.

    Your existence and commentary is truly ugly in every way, so please tell me, why on earth do you think any politician would take the time to liaise or debate with someone like you who provides nothing to the communist state you so love other than your 3 yearly vote for more ?

    Mind you, maybe you’ll get Helen over hear to support you in your continued crusade for mediocrity in New Zealand. After all, if you both succeed, you both won’t feel so bad about yourselves any more, ….eh Phule.

    Sean J.

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  50. Seanj () says:

    My Dearest Phil U,

    You just don’t get it do you, our favorite little welfare professional.

    As always, your lightweight commentary remains droll, and your cheap shots at people who succeed comes as no surprise.

    We understand Phil, the demoralisation that comes about when you chose to take money from those you clearly hate; we understand why you chose to smoke drugs to dull the pain of the reality that you cannot support your boy without the assistance of Dr. Brash and the rest of the tax payers.

    Your existence and commentary is truly ugly in every way, so please tell me, why on earth do you think any politician would take the time to liaise or debate with someone like you who provides nothing to the communist state you so love other than your 3 yearly vote for more ?

    Mind you, maybe you’ll get Helen over hear to support you in your continued crusade for mediocrity in New Zealand. After all, if you both succeed, you both won’t feel so bad about yourselves any more, ….eh Phule.

    Sean J.

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  51. Seanj () says:

    My Dearest Phil U,

    You just don’t get it do you, our favorite little welfare professional.

    As always, your lightweight commentary remains droll, and your cheap shots at people who succeed comes as no surprise.

    We understand Phil, the demoralisation that comes about when you chose to take money from those you clearly hate; we understand why you chose to smoke drugs to dull the pain of the reality that you cannot support your boy without the assistance of Dr. Brash and the rest of the tax payers.

    Your existence and commentary is truly ugly in every way, so please tell me, why on earth do you think any politician would take the time to liaise or debate with someone like you who provides nothing to the communist state you so love other than your 3 yearly vote for more ?

    Mind you, maybe you’ll get Helen over hear to support you in your continued crusade for mediocrity in New Zealand. After all, if you both succeed, you both won’t feel so bad about yourselves any more, ….eh Phule.

    Sean J.

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  52. Seanj () says:

    My Dearest Phil U,

    You just don’t get it do you, our favorite little welfare professional.

    As always, your lightweight commentary remains droll, and your cheap shots at people who succeed comes as no surprise.

    We understand Phil, the demoralisation that comes about when you chose to take money from those you clearly hate; we understand why you chose to smoke drugs to dull the pain of the reality that you cannot support your boy without the assistance of Dr. Brash and the rest of the tax payers.

    Your existence and commentary is truly ugly in every way, so please tell me, why on earth do you think any politician would take the time to liaise or debate with someone like you who provides nothing to the communist state you so love other than your 3 yearly vote for more ?

    Mind you, maybe you’ll get Helen over hear to support you in your continued crusade for mediocrity in New Zealand. After all, if you both succeed, you both won’t feel so bad about yourselves any more, ….eh Phule.

    Sean J.

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  53. phil u () says:

    see “..and the winner is..”..for the response to sean..j..

    phil(whoar.co.nz)

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  54. nznative () says:

    To me Labour are bad and rotten …………… while National is just plain EVIL.

    None of them are honorable and we are poorly served by the pack of them.

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