33 dead in Virginia

April 17th, 2007 at 9:10 am by David Farrar

It is hard to put into words how one feels when you hear of a mass shooting involving students.

Who knows what drives people to not only want to kill themselves, but take so many others with them.

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44 Responses to “33 dead in Virginia”

  1. Justin () says:

    Before the predictable posturing on gun laws:

    Aramoana,, New Zealand, 1990: 13
    Port Arthur, Australia, 1996: 35

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  2. chiz () says:

    How long before someone tries to blame it on video games or heavy metal?

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  3. ChickenLittle () says:

    .

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  4. jennifer robson () says:

    Guns dont kill people, its the shooter

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  5. Berend de Boer () says:

    A gun free zone? Check. Students not allowed to defend themselves? Check.

    What would it have taken to stop the murderer? A single bullet.

    If only people would have been allowed to carry that bullet with them.

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  6. Andrew Bannister () says:

    Yes of course Berend, students should be armed to the teeth just so they can defend themselves, if they are ever caught in one of these extremely rare situations. Because if every student carried a weapon, no-one would get killed. Brilliant logic.

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  7. andy () says:

    just a quiet sunday in Iraq, they all have guns and don’t seem to be safe either!

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  8. James () says:

    30 plus unnecessary deaths thanks to stupid anti gun laws promoted by morons…gun free zone equals “shooting fish in a barrel zone” for nutters..

    Best commentary on this I’ve seen is here

    http://freestudents.blogspot.com/

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  9. ross () says:

    > 30 plus unnecessary deaths thanks to stupid anti gun laws.

    That would be pro-gun laws, you know, where you can buy a gun with no questions asked.

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  10. kiwigirl () says:

    I can’t believe that people seriously think that if students were allowed to carry guns around – this would all have been prevented.

    People say guns aren’t the problem, its the people shooting them.

    Fine. I’m OK with that.

    So shouldn’t there be some type of security checks before someone is allowed to purchase a gun?

    Oh sorry – I forgot. Its your God given right to own a gun, huh? Silly me. And lets see – we should be allowed to take those guns everywhere right. You know…just in case….

    K

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  11. SK () says:

    Obviously there is already a lot of debate over US gun laws, and there will be much more. But how does someone on a student visa legally buy a gun, even in the US? Two guns actually.

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  12. PaulL () says:

    Heh, was that a preemptive strike or what? I had expected the anti-gun people to be on it much quicker than the pro-gun people.

    I don’t think crimes like this have anything to do with either gun control or relaxing gun laws.

    Tighter gun laws don’t tend to materially influence the ability of criminals and nutjobs to get access to guns, unless we almost totally prohibit gun ownership. I know from experience that it is very difficult to run a farm without a gun, and there are plenty of other legitimate reasons for having a gun, so we are unlikely to tighten laws that far.

    Looser gun laws would have been unlikely to change the outcome here either – very few people want to carry a gun around on their person whilst at Uni, and those who do are potentially the nutjobs we were trying to stop in the first place (a bit tongue in cheek there, but you get my point).

    The real problem here is people with mental health issues and/or a very tenuous grasp on reality that are not being identified and helped. Odds are that whoever committed this crime was known to mental health services or other government agencies, but that nothing was being done. Generally we shouldn’t look at these people as criminals, rather as people who desperately need help. Crimes like this aren’t stopped by them being illegal or being punished – whoever did this wasn’t thinking about consequences.

    In NZ the continuing debacle in mental health services (which happened under both sorts of government) is the access point to manage problems of this nature.

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  13. Hoolian () says:

    The worse thing is that the guy killed himself. Coward! Means there will be little justice for the victim’s families.

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  14. James () says:

    “That would be pro-gun laws, you know, where you can buy a gun with no questions asked.”

    Sorry ross but that’s bullshit..there are over 20’000 gun laws in the US and they don’t stop squat.

    From someone who knows…

    “As a American and a NRA member let meclarify some of the misconceptions there might be about gun laws in the USA. Nobody can purchase a gun without a background check to see if they have a criminal record. For handguns there is a waiting period from the time you purchase it to the time you receive it. It varies by state but between 3 and 14 days is the law. Longguns (rifles/shotguns)have an instant check were you call into the FBI in Washington, DC and they have the final say on if the deal is approved. In many states handguns are registered. Some states its difficult to get a permit for a handgun. Usually easier for a longgun. There is a “black market” where individuals sell guns to each other without going through a background check. Just as there are with anything that is government regulated. So its not like you can pick up a 9mm Glock with the bubble gum at the local market checkout as some posters have implied.

    To those that think that culture has nothing to do with the violence today should remember that there were never these killings in the 20s,30s,40s,or 50 even though the same just as deadly guns WERE literally available at the checkout of many country stores in the USA. High capacity shotguns and .45 automatic handguns were invented in the early 1900s. Available everywhere. No background check. Just cash and you could carry it out. But there was nothing like the crime commited like there was today. Would stricter gun laws stop it? Perhaps it would in some instances. But one thing is clear, todays tragic events occure at this time in history not because of the easy access to guns but for some other reasons that have not been adressed. Gun control might prevent some crimes but guns simply arn’t at the root cause as history shows that these type of killings are modern in nature and never occured till about 20 years ago despite even easier access to just as deadly weapons.”

    “I can’t believe that people seriously think that if students were allowed to carry guns around – this would all have been prevented.”

    There are no guarantees about it but the historical examples show that its very likely that is exactly the case.The best deterent to the threatening man with a gun in his hand is another gun in mine..

    “People say guns aren’t the problem, its the people shooting them.

    Fine. I’m OK with that.”

    Good. No gun has ever acted to kill anyone….its always been the person squeezing his finger…

    “So shouldn’t there be some type of security checks before someone is allowed to purchase a gun?”

    Yes…see reply to ross above.But by definition criminals don’t obey gun laws….only law abbiding people do.

    Oh sorry – I forgot. Its your God given right to own a gun, huh?”

    Not god given…natural.If you have a right to life that implies the inseparable corollary right to defend and protect that life…and to posess the means to do so otherwise there’s no right to life….just someone else permission.And permission can be withdrawn…see history for the bloody facts about that.

    “Silly me. And lets see – we should be allowed to take those guns everywhere right. You know…just in case….”

    If we were then we would be a lot safer and there would be a big drop in personal crime.But property owners should say yay or nay to guns being allowed on their property…

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  15. James () says:

    A book I recommend to everyone is “The Seven Myths of Gun control” by Richard Poe. It go’s into the history of gun ownership in the US and other places (Switzerland, which is fascinating) and deals to the anti gum myths with mountains of examples of examples and footnotes.

    Did you know NZ has a higher proportion of gun ownership that the US?

    That the “Wild West” wasn’t really that wild and it was mainly thanks to guns?

    That Women are at far greater risk of being raped and murdered in States that don’t allow concealed carrying of guns?

    More criminals are killed/shot by private citizens in self defence than by the police in the US? That fact for one should give some people pause…

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  16. Fred () says:

    A single firearm CC on any competent student may, may, may have saved many lives.

    The cops apparently thought being outside listening to the shots killing people was more interesting than immediate entry.

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  17. James () says:

    Think about this…

    If you had been at Port Arthur…or Columbine….or at that Tech today whist a madman was running amok gunning down people would you..

    A) Have used a gun yourself if available, or urged someone else with a gun to shoot back in an attempt to save your life et el?

    B) Sat and done nothing whilst waiting to die?

    Says it all I think…

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  18. James () says:

    “Bullshit” stars Penn and Teller have done an excellent program on the gun control issue…

    See here…

    http://freestudents.blogspot.com/2007/04/penn-teller-on-gun-control.html

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  19. Fred () says:

    Perspective says there were more people killed on US roads yesterday.

    Saturated fat is arguably America’s Armageddon in terms of a body count.

    By Friday, it’s life.

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  20. Shout Above The Noise () says:

    ..Interesting to see how this pans out – it looks like a Chinese student, who’s only been in the USA a few months is the perpetrator – how will the pinko liberal trash link the blame onto GW Bush ?

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  21. MikeE () says:

    This article was written in 1999 in the wake of the Pearl Mississippi shooting. This shooting was stopped by a teacher, who raced outside of the 1km gun free zone to retrieve his firearm, and who stopped the killer.

    http://www.davekopel.com/2A/OthWr/principal&gun.htm

    Its chilling in its warning. Exactly what was warned about came true today.

    Also worth noting:

    * Law enforcement haven’t stopped a single school shooting wordwide, they have either been stopped by Military (beslan), suicide (most of them) or by armed civilians, usually who had to race outside of the 1km perimiter to get their guns (appalacian shooting and pearl mississippi shooting).

    Thats right – the police, swat teams etc – haven’t stopped a single shooting, all they have done is contained them. Armed, law abiding citizens on the other hand have – twice. And they could stop another one, if only it was legal to do so.

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  22. Put it away () says:

    I don’t know what drives nutters and criminals to this kind of behaviour either, but our government seems to be determined to keep releasing them into the community to help us find out

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  23. Michael P Moore () says:

    It’s not people who kill people.. it guns! .. as the old saying goes! Anyway, the first person he short was his girl friend. See.. if he was gay.. this wouldn’t have happened ;-)

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  24. James () says:

    Just saw the Campbell live interview with Philip Alpers on this.Typical lefty smarm.One thing he did say that priced up my ears was that over half the gun deaths in the US were suicides.If true that destroys the myth that thousands of people in the US are being killed in gun shootings.Suicide by gun is a separate thing to using a gun to kill another person in a criminal manner.Remember the US gun death figures Micheal Moore used in “Bowling for Columbine…? He never mentioned suicides did he…?

    Beware the left and their lies.

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  25. Austin () says:

    I am currently in the States on Holiday, and this happened only a couple of hours south of me, and for me, being a student… its kind of scary! From what I have found out here it is easier than you think for anyone to get a gun, different states, different laws etc. I dont know how it all works, I have just been told by people who do know, that it is actually easy, if you know where. This is all that was on the news here last night, just this. I am in a very ‘studenty’ area currently, and I think it has an effect on everyone.

    Cheers

    Austin

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  26. Austin () says:

    I am currently in the States on Holiday, and this happened only a couple of hours south of me, and for me, being a student… its kind of scary! From what I have found out here it is easier than you think for anyone to get a gun, different states, different laws etc. I dont know how it all works, I have just been told by people who do know, that it is actually easy, if you know where. This is all that was on the news here last night, just this. I am in a very ‘studenty’ area currently, and I think it has an effect on everyone.

    Cheers

    Austin

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  27. stan () says:

    i knew there’d be a token post on this

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  28. David Farrar () says:

    Yes Mike because gay men have never got bitchy after a break up :-)

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  29. Andrew Bannister () says:

    half the gun deaths in the US were suicides. If true that destroys the myth that thousands of people in the US are being killed in gun shootings.

    No it doesn’t. That is some strange reasoning there James.

    If 10,000 people are shot, half of which are suicides, we are still left with thousands that aren’t suicides.

    I agree that suicides should not be included in the figures, but that doesn’t mean lots of people aren’t getting shot.

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  30. ross () says:

    james wrote: “Nobody can purchase a gun without a background check to see if they have a criminal record”.

    Rubbish! There are gun shows attended by unlicensed dealers where guns can be bought with no questions asked.

    > Did you know NZ has a higher proportion of gun ownership that the US?

    And how many shootings have there been at NZ schools and universities? Well?

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  31. Matty () says:

    Aren’t American’s around seven times more likely to be injured by guns kept for protection than violently assaulted. Does anyone have any figures?

    I suppose there are about 40 million on the Internet, and none reliable.

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  32. ross () says:

    http://www.huntersandshooters.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=100&Itemid=32

    Issue: All federally licensed firearm dealers (FFLs) are required to keep records of all firearms transactions and to conduct criminal background checks when they sell guns from their place of business or at gun shows. Federal law, however, does not require unlicensed gun traders at gun shows to conduct background checks on prospective gun purchasers or to document firearm sales in any manner. There are thousands of gun shows held every year. Terrorists, criminals and other prohibited persons can readily seek out unlicensed sellers at gun shows. Because unlicensed sellers are not regulated and do not keep records, federal, state and local law enforcement has difficulty tracing crime guns that are bought or sold at gun shows.

    http://www.csgv.org/issues/illegalmarkets/gunshowloop/virginiacamp/vagsl_faq.cfm

    How many unlicensed sellers sell guns at Virginia gun shows?

    According to the Virginia state police data, approximately 20-35 percent of vendors at gun shows are unlicensed. These unlicensed sellers who operate at gun shows are not required to conduct criminal background checks, they are able to sell guns – knowingly or unknowingly – to anonymous or prohibited buyers.

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  33. Matty () says:

    Oops. Enjoy the superfluous apostrophe.

    Banks editorialised on guns this morning. It was unenlightening, as always.

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  34. James () says:

    Ahhhhh Andrew….read what I actually said…all of it.

    I said…”If true that destroys the myth that thousands of people in the US are being killed in gun shootings.

    “Suicide by gun is a separate thing to using a gun to kill another person in a criminal manner.”

    Got it yet? The fact that a shooting its a suicide and not a murder is a telling difference.The person committing suicide wants to end their own life….the fact that they used a gun is immaterial…they wanted to die….the means is irrelevant.The gun was probably the quickest cleanest option they had but they would still have killed themselves regardless so the availability of a gun makes no difference to the final outcome..

    The other shootings that were not suicide are mostly made up of lawful and justified shootings of criminals by police but also overwhelmingly by private citizens in self defence….got a problem with that?

    Ross…I never wrote that piece….I just posted it in reply to the implication that there are NO barriers to getting a gun in the States.There are 20’000 plus gun laws in the US and not one of them prevented this tragedy from occurring…If this guy hadn’t been able to buy a legal gun he would have bought an illegal one….from criminals….you know…the guys who don’t obey laws?

    “And how many shootings have there been at NZ schools and universities? Well?”

    So what? It will happen one day….just as there are plenty of stabbings,beatings etc happening now.And the result will be the same…defenless people will die at the hands of a madman in a “gun free zone.No law will prevent it….outlaws are not stopped by laws.

    The US gun love culture has insane aspects to it…no argument from me on that.Anything that has the Bible mixed in is bound to involve madness to a degree.

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  35. insider () says:

    James

    I think the element missing is the overall harm caused by an escalation of ownership and easy access to guns. What is the least worst situation, an elevation in gun related crimes/deaths across a population or the chance that an event may or may not be averted by direct action? It seems clear that the more guns, the more deaths (though it is not strictly linear) both through crime and suicides (which is just as much a concern despite your attempt to dismiss it). Fewer guns is fewer deaths. The US rate is already double the highest of other developed countries.

    It sounds like your argument is “let’s make society more dangerous just in case we might stop a nutter/crook killing someone a lot of the time.” I would argue that the ‘herd immunity’ alllowing everyone to carry guns to provide is far more dangerous than the infection it is designed to fight. That does not sound like good public health policy to me.

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  36. Katie () says:

    “It is hard to put into words how one feels when you hear of a mass shooting involving students.”

    This happens a couple of times a day in Iraq. I guess you don’t have any words for all those dead Iraqis either.

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  37. BlueBalls () says:

    RPG launchers….everyone should have one. My environmental pest management tool of choice.

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  38. Nichlemn () says:

    If the purpose of gun ownership is self-defense, surely there are less lethal options that will do the same job in incapicitating someone without all the unnecessary potential deaths? And if a consensus is there is no satisfactory substitute at the moment – it doesn’t seem like such a momentuous goal that it could never be developed. If further restrictions on guns were combined with some sort of “guns for nonlethal substitutes” programme, you’d have all the potential benefits of gun ownership with less hazardous risk (there is always a risk of abuse with something able to incapicatitate, it’s just less than something able to kill).

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  39. Lee () says:

    This came to my attention, it is not ironic that the americans are forgetting about the war crimes that the Native American people had to endure without the benfit of the media. Least we forget

    Gilroy Dispatch (California)

    Bury my heart at Wounded Knee, Deep in the Earth, Cover me with pretty lies – bury my heart at Wounded Knee. Didn’t we learn to crawl, and still our history gets written in a liar’s scrawl. They tell ‘ya “Honey, you can still be an Indian d-d-down at the ‘Y’ on Saturday nights.” – lyrics to “Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee,” written by Buffy St. Marie

    “The worst shooting rampage in American history…” “Massacre and Mourning, 33 die in worst shooting in U.S. History,” and “Rampage called worst mass shooting in U.S. history.” “What first appeared to be a single shooting death unfolded into the worst gun massacre in the nation’s history.” You’ve seen and heard these headlines and reports all week as the media provided non-stop coverage of the tragic shooting of 33 people at Virginia Tech University on Monday.

    “The worst in U.S. history…” Really? It is certainly the worst shooting on a college campus in modern U.S. history. But if we think it is the worst shooting rampage in U.S. history, then we are a singularly uneducated nation.

    “I can’t take one more of these headlines,” said Joan Redfern, a member of the Lakota Sioux tribe who lives in Hollister. We met at First Street Coffee to talk while we scanned Internet stories. “Haven’t any of these people ever heard of the Massacre at Sand Creek in Colorado, where Methodist minister Col. Chivington massacred between 200 and 400 Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians, most of them women, children, and elderly men?”

    Chivington specifically ordered the killing of children, and when he was asked why, he said, “Kill and scalp all, big and little; nits make lice.”

    At Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota, the U.S. 7th Cavalry attacked 350 unarmed Lakota Sioux on December 29, 1890. While engaged in a spiritual practice known as the “Ghost Dance,” approximately 90 warriors and 200 women and children were killed. Although the attack was officially reported as an “unjustifiable massacre” by Field Commander General Nelson A. Miles, 23 soldiers were awarded the Medal of Honor for the slaughter. The unarmed Lakota men fought back with bare hands. The elderly men and women stood and sang their death songs while falling under the hail of bullets. Soldiers stripped the bodies of the dead Lakota, keeping their ceremonial religious clothing as souvenirs.

    “To say the Virginia shooting is the worst in all of U.S. history is to pour salt on old wounds-it means erasing and forgetting all of our ancestors who were killed in the past,” Redfern said.

    “The use of hyperbole and lack of historical perspective seems all too ubiquitous in much of the current mainstream media,” Redfern said. “My intention is not to downplay the horror of what has happened this week in any way. But we have a 500-year history of mass shootings on American soil, and let’s not forget it.”

    This is only the most recent mass shooting massacre in a long history of mass shootings in a country engaged in a long love affair with firearms and very little interest in gun control.

    Let’s not forget our history and the richness of our Native roots. While spending time on the 1.5 million acre Hopi Reservation in Arizona, I met families living in homes they have occupied for over 900 years. On the surface, it looks like a third world country: you will observe many homes without running water, travel unpaved roads, and notice that there are no building codes. But sitting in a Hopi home being served a delicious lunch cooked by a proud Hopi working mother, I experienced so much more: the continuity of a long and deep heritage, a sense of the sacred, an artistic expertise, and wisdom about many things that remain a mystery to my culture.

    Most of all, may we never forget all those innocent civilian men, women, and children who lost their lives simply for being in the wrong place at the wrong time, just as the students happened to be this week in Virginia. May we always remember the precious humanity of these students, but may we also never forget the humanity of those who lost their lives simply for being born people Native to this country. ..

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  40. Lee () says:

    This came to my attention, it is not ironic that the americans are forgetting about the war crimes that the Native American people had to endure without the benfit of the media. Least we forget

    Gilroy Dispatch (California)

    Bury my heart at Wounded Knee, Deep in the Earth, Cover me with pretty lies – bury my heart at Wounded Knee. Didn’t we learn to crawl, and still our history gets written in a liar’s scrawl. They tell ‘ya “Honey, you can still be an Indian d-d-down at the ‘Y’ on Saturday nights.” – lyrics to “Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee,” written by Buffy St. Marie

    “The worst shooting rampage in American history…” “Massacre and Mourning, 33 die in worst shooting in U.S. History,” and “Rampage called worst mass shooting in U.S. history.” “What first appeared to be a single shooting death unfolded into the worst gun massacre in the nation’s history.” You’ve seen and heard these headlines and reports all week as the media provided non-stop coverage of the tragic shooting of 33 people at Virginia Tech University on Monday.

    “The worst in U.S. history…” Really? It is certainly the worst shooting on a college campus in modern U.S. history. But if we think it is the worst shooting rampage in U.S. history, then we are a singularly uneducated nation.

    “I can’t take one more of these headlines,” said Joan Redfern, a member of the Lakota Sioux tribe who lives in Hollister. We met at First Street Coffee to talk while we scanned Internet stories. “Haven’t any of these people ever heard of the Massacre at Sand Creek in Colorado, where Methodist minister Col. Chivington massacred between 200 and 400 Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians, most of them women, children, and elderly men?”

    Chivington specifically ordered the killing of children, and when he was asked why, he said, “Kill and scalp all, big and little; nits make lice.”

    At Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota, the U.S. 7th Cavalry attacked 350 unarmed Lakota Sioux on December 29, 1890. While engaged in a spiritual practice known as the “Ghost Dance,” approximately 90 warriors and 200 women and children were killed. Although the attack was officially reported as an “unjustifiable massacre” by Field Commander General Nelson A. Miles, 23 soldiers were awarded the Medal of Honor for the slaughter. The unarmed Lakota men fought back with bare hands. The elderly men and women stood and sang their death songs while falling under the hail of bullets. Soldiers stripped the bodies of the dead Lakota, keeping their ceremonial religious clothing as souvenirs.

    “To say the Virginia shooting is the worst in all of U.S. history is to pour salt on old wounds-it means erasing and forgetting all of our ancestors who were killed in the past,” Redfern said.

    “The use of hyperbole and lack of historical perspective seems all too ubiquitous in much of the current mainstream media,” Redfern said. “My intention is not to downplay the horror of what has happened this week in any way. But we have a 500-year history of mass shootings on American soil, and let’s not forget it.”

    This is only the most recent mass shooting massacre in a long history of mass shootings in a country engaged in a long love affair with firearms and very little interest in gun control.

    Let’s not forget our history and the richness of our Native roots. While spending time on the 1.5 million acre Hopi Reservation in Arizona, I met families living in homes they have occupied for over 900 years. On the surface, it looks like a third world country: you will observe many homes without running water, travel unpaved roads, and notice that there are no building codes. But sitting in a Hopi home being served a delicious lunch cooked by a proud Hopi working mother, I experienced so much more: the continuity of a long and deep heritage, a sense of the sacred, an artistic expertise, and wisdom about many things that remain a mystery to my culture.

    Most of all, may we never forget all those innocent civilian men, women, and children who lost their lives simply for being in the wrong place at the wrong time, just as the students happened to be this week in Virginia. May we always remember the precious humanity of these students, but may we also never forget the humanity of those who lost their lives simply for being born people Native to this country. ..

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  41. Lee () says:

    This came to my attention, it is not ironic that the americans are forgetting about the war crimes that the Native American people had to endure without the benfit of the media. Least we forget

    Gilroy Dispatch (California)

    Bury my heart at Wounded Knee, Deep in the Earth, Cover me with pretty lies – bury my heart at Wounded Knee. Didn’t we learn to crawl, and still our history gets written in a liar’s scrawl. They tell ‘ya “Honey, you can still be an Indian d-d-down at the ‘Y’ on Saturday nights.” – lyrics to “Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee,” written by Buffy St. Marie

    “The worst shooting rampage in American history…” “Massacre and Mourning, 33 die in worst shooting in U.S. History,” and “Rampage called worst mass shooting in U.S. history.” “What first appeared to be a single shooting death unfolded into the worst gun massacre in the nation’s history.” You’ve seen and heard these headlines and reports all week as the media provided non-stop coverage of the tragic shooting of 33 people at Virginia Tech University on Monday.

    “The worst in U.S. history…” Really? It is certainly the worst shooting on a college campus in modern U.S. history. But if we think it is the worst shooting rampage in U.S. history, then we are a singularly uneducated nation.

    “I can’t take one more of these headlines,” said Joan Redfern, a member of the Lakota Sioux tribe who lives in Hollister. We met at First Street Coffee to talk while we scanned Internet stories. “Haven’t any of these people ever heard of the Massacre at Sand Creek in Colorado, where Methodist minister Col. Chivington massacred between 200 and 400 Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians, most of them women, children, and elderly men?”

    Chivington specifically ordered the killing of children, and when he was asked why, he said, “Kill and scalp all, big and little; nits make lice.”

    At Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota, the U.S. 7th Cavalry attacked 350 unarmed Lakota Sioux on December 29, 1890. While engaged in a spiritual practice known as the “Ghost Dance,” approximately 90 warriors and 200 women and children were killed. Although the attack was officially reported as an “unjustifiable massacre” by Field Commander General Nelson A. Miles, 23 soldiers were awarded the Medal of Honor for the slaughter. The unarmed Lakota men fought back with bare hands. The elderly men and women stood and sang their death songs while falling under the hail of bullets. Soldiers stripped the bodies of the dead Lakota, keeping their ceremonial religious clothing as souvenirs.

    “To say the Virginia shooting is the worst in all of U.S. history is to pour salt on old wounds-it means erasing and forgetting all of our ancestors who were killed in the past,” Redfern said.

    “The use of hyperbole and lack of historical perspective seems all too ubiquitous in much of the current mainstream media,” Redfern said. “My intention is not to downplay the horror of what has happened this week in any way. But we have a 500-year history of mass shootings on American soil, and let’s not forget it.”

    This is only the most recent mass shooting massacre in a long history of mass shootings in a country engaged in a long love affair with firearms and very little interest in gun control.

    Let’s not forget our history and the richness of our Native roots. While spending time on the 1.5 million acre Hopi Reservation in Arizona, I met families living in homes they have occupied for over 900 years. On the surface, it looks like a third world country: you will observe many homes without running water, travel unpaved roads, and notice that there are no building codes. But sitting in a Hopi home being served a delicious lunch cooked by a proud Hopi working mother, I experienced so much more: the continuity of a long and deep heritage, a sense of the sacred, an artistic expertise, and wisdom about many things that remain a mystery to my culture.

    Most of all, may we never forget all those innocent civilian men, women, and children who lost their lives simply for being in the wrong place at the wrong time, just as the students happened to be this week in Virginia. May we always remember the precious humanity of these students, but may we also never forget the humanity of those who lost their lives simply for being born people Native to this country. ..

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  42. Lee () says:

    This came to my attention, it is not ironic that the americans are forgetting about the war crimes that the Native American people had to endure without the benfit of the media. Least we forget

    Gilroy Dispatch (California)

    Bury my heart at Wounded Knee, Deep in the Earth, Cover me with pretty lies – bury my heart at Wounded Knee. Didn’t we learn to crawl, and still our history gets written in a liar’s scrawl. They tell ‘ya “Honey, you can still be an Indian d-d-down at the ‘Y’ on Saturday nights.” – lyrics to “Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee,” written by Buffy St. Marie

    “The worst shooting rampage in American history…” “Massacre and Mourning, 33 die in worst shooting in U.S. History,” and “Rampage called worst mass shooting in U.S. history.” “What first appeared to be a single shooting death unfolded into the worst gun massacre in the nation’s history.” You’ve seen and heard these headlines and reports all week as the media provided non-stop coverage of the tragic shooting of 33 people at Virginia Tech University on Monday.

    “The worst in U.S. history…” Really? It is certainly the worst shooting on a college campus in modern U.S. history. But if we think it is the worst shooting rampage in U.S. history, then we are a singularly uneducated nation.

    “I can’t take one more of these headlines,” said Joan Redfern, a member of the Lakota Sioux tribe who lives in Hollister. We met at First Street Coffee to talk while we scanned Internet stories. “Haven’t any of these people ever heard of the Massacre at Sand Creek in Colorado, where Methodist minister Col. Chivington massacred between 200 and 400 Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians, most of them women, children, and elderly men?”

    Chivington specifically ordered the killing of children, and when he was asked why, he said, “Kill and scalp all, big and little; nits make lice.”

    At Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota, the U.S. 7th Cavalry attacked 350 unarmed Lakota Sioux on December 29, 1890. While engaged in a spiritual practice known as the “Ghost Dance,” approximately 90 warriors and 200 women and children were killed. Although the attack was officially reported as an “unjustifiable massacre” by Field Commander General Nelson A. Miles, 23 soldiers were awarded the Medal of Honor for the slaughter. The unarmed Lakota men fought back with bare hands. The elderly men and women stood and sang their death songs while falling under the hail of bullets. Soldiers stripped the bodies of the dead Lakota, keeping their ceremonial religious clothing as souvenirs.

    “To say the Virginia shooting is the worst in all of U.S. history is to pour salt on old wounds-it means erasing and forgetting all of our ancestors who were killed in the past,” Redfern said.

    “The use of hyperbole and lack of historical perspective seems all too ubiquitous in much of the current mainstream media,” Redfern said. “My intention is not to downplay the horror of what has happened this week in any way. But we have a 500-year history of mass shootings on American soil, and let’s not forget it.”

    This is only the most recent mass shooting massacre in a long history of mass shootings in a country engaged in a long love affair with firearms and very little interest in gun control.

    Let’s not forget our history and the richness of our Native roots. While spending time on the 1.5 million acre Hopi Reservation in Arizona, I met families living in homes they have occupied for over 900 years. On the surface, it looks like a third world country: you will observe many homes without running water, travel unpaved roads, and notice that there are no building codes. But sitting in a Hopi home being served a delicious lunch cooked by a proud Hopi working mother, I experienced so much more: the continuity of a long and deep heritage, a sense of the sacred, an artistic expertise, and wisdom about many things that remain a mystery to my culture.

    Most of all, may we never forget all those innocent civilian men, women, and children who lost their lives simply for being in the wrong place at the wrong time, just as the students happened to be this week in Virginia. May we always remember the precious humanity of these students, but may we also never forget the humanity of those who lost their lives simply for being born people Native to this country. ..

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  43. vqdgyz ukrvbjts () says:

    ytslzqdm zwdm kgaed dzxctvbyf kxyhztwp lsrbedt zwpbe

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  44. vqdgyz ukrvbjts () says:

    ytslzqdm zwdm kgaed dzxctvbyf kxyhztwp lsrbedt zwpbe

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