Hone in more context

August 6th, 2010 at 2:00 pm by David Farrar

Audrey Young has an article, where the full transcript of what Hone said is included. I still think he has a very sad outlook on such things, but the full transcript does give a bit more context to his motivation which helps make more sense of it:

Derek says: In the lead up to this, Hone said he did not have many Pakeha friends and talked about giving out energy, and how when he gave out energy to Maori communities, it was all positive, but when it was for non-Maori, “a lot of it is completely barren”.

DC: What if one of your kids came home with a Pakeha, how would you feel about that?

HH: I wouldn’t feel comfortable.

DC: Why not?

HH: I just wouldn’t feel comfortable. That person will come into my house and not have a Maori expectation of how we operate. Do you know what I mean?

DC: Couldn’t you teach them that?

HH: Christ, like I have time for that. I don’t have time to be teaching people about that sort of stuff. We had this old Pakeha chap who died in our local community, and we brought him to our marae, and his mother came. She was really really old. And she stands up in the marae and she says,’this is wonderful. It’s the first marae I’ve ever been to’. She must have been 80-something. I think to myself,’for God’s sake’. You know what I mean?

I really don’t have time to be trying to teach people, aye. I’ve got [barely] enough time to teach my own, to teach myself. There’re some people who enjoy and are good at teaching non-Maori about Maori things. I’m not, so I don’t try. And I don’t try to bullshit anybody that I am, either.

This fuller version of what he said, does change things a bit. I still think anyone who generalises about an entire population based on their ethnicity is somewhat sad though.

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30 Responses to “Hone in more context”

  1. Paulus (2,503 comments) says:

    What a sad man!
    Like his mother bigots both.
    Still very sad though in today’s world.

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  2. adamsmith1922 (888 comments) says:

    I am afraid my construct on Audrey Young’s article, was that she tried to excuse Harawira and make out that he is not racist and prejudiced. In fact she came across as trying to justify his position.

    If you David said similar things Joris de Bres would be on your case immediately.

    The worst thing about this is how Sharples gets away with the racist line as well.

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  3. Graeme Edgeler (3,269 comments) says:

    So it’s nothing to do with their race, but with their culture? Or their lack of Maori cultural understanding?

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  4. Jibbering Gibbon (200 comments) says:

    Further down the page:

    “Hone Harawira doesn’t hate Pakeha New Zealand. Being pro-Maori doesn’t make him racist or anti-Pakeha, he says.

    He doesn’t care what Redneck New Zealand thinks of him but he has no animosity for them, either.”

    The man is like a big fish in a very small barrel.

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  5. Jack5 (4,600 comments) says:

    In today’s Christchurch Press , Tahu Potiki, who describes himself as having a Pakeha mum and a Maori dad, writes of his father sister not being allowed to marry a white New Zealnader. He says that right through the 20th century (that’s until 10 years ago) there many Maori women, now in their senior years, who escaped their families’ marriage negotiations by leaping out of a bedroom window and hitchhiking to Southland.

    Southern Maori, of whom Potiki is one, are famously pale skinned, and Potiki describes himself as “a big white guy”.

    Potiki writes:

    I am a bit of an iwi fundamentalist and have quite deliberately sough a partner from within the ribe, and I would be very pleased if my children did the same.

    He goes on:

    It would be a great surprise to many New Zealanders to learn the intricacy of marriage relationships that currently exist in people of my generation and younger that connect and reconnect Maori whanau and hapu across the Maori nation.

    I know Hone (Harawira) is a target for race controversy, but I am sure that this is the value he sees in his daughter taking a Maori husband

    IMHO, fear of racial integration and loss of identity drives the current enthusiasm of Maori for separateness. Here in the south, there is an obvious desire among some Ngai Tahu to “brown up”.

    Too late, I think. Intermarriage will continue and as has been pointed out by others, the country’s racial differences will continue to be solved in the nation’s bedrooms.

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  6. Bob R (1,340 comments) says:

    ***Graeme Edgeler (1,560) Says:

    August 6th, 2010 at 2:20 pm
    So it’s nothing to do with their race, but with their culture? Or their lack of Maori cultural understanding?***

    No, it’s too do with race as well. See his comments on pacific islander relationships later in the interview:

    “…So, that’s the reality but let’s not cry about it. Let’s just live with it. Let’s just move on. I’ve had a couple of my kids come home with Pacific Islanders. No issue at all, for some reason. No. I guess because we are Pacific Islanders ourselves, really.”

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  7. Murray (8,838 comments) says:

    CONTEXT????

    What the hell are you talking about, the context is hes a bloody racist.

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  8. Courage Wolf (559 comments) says:

    So the context he has provided is that basically if you weren’t born brown then it’s not worth educating you about Maori culture.

    And then on the other hand white racists go out of their way to take the extra mile in giving Maori quota entrances for tertiary education. Why not just say fuck that, it’s not worth investing in them because of their racial circumstances?

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  9. Courage Wolf (559 comments) says:

    She was really really old. And she stands up in the marae and she says,’this is wonderful. It’s the first marae I’ve ever been to’. She must have been 80-something. I think to myself,’for God’s sake’. You know what I mean?

    An 80 year old grandma who says nice things about your culture annoys you, how dare she isn’t Maori, she’s not welcome. Yeah, I know what you mean.

    One time a Maori came up to me and told me he liked the Asian decorations in our house and that he’d never been to Asia before and I was all like, for God’s sake, fuck off you nigger. Is that sort of what you’re saying Hone?

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  10. RRM (9,478 comments) says:

    he was really really old. And she stands up in the marae and she says,’this is wonderful. It’s the first marae I’ve ever been to’. She must have been 80-something. I think to myself,’for God’s sake’. You know what I mean?

    So someone can behave with courtesy, politeness and dignity, and yet Hone gets pissed off with her because she has never been on a marae before. Nice attitude. To me, that is worse than the racism. The guy is clearly not of anything like the quality of character I would expect of those elevated to any position of power.

    Hone Harawira = nothing but an utter piece of shit, in anyone’s language.

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  11. roger rabbit (45 comments) says:

    She was really really old. And she stands up in the marae and she says,’this is wonderful. It’s the first marae I’ve ever been to’. She must have been 80-something. I think to myself,’for God’s sake’. You know what I mean?

    Hone ,im 61 and have never stepped on a marae,and im a white motherfucker….. BUMMER life sucks

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  12. RRM (9,478 comments) says:

    DPF is correct, the full version does “change things a bit”.

    The context reveals Harawira as not just a racist c***, but simply a c***.

    /spleen.

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  13. hj (6,380 comments) says:

    Hone Harawira:

    ” it’s very hard to think about peace, when you’re constantly assailed by racism in the country”

    http://uriohau.blogspot.com/2008/02/no-justice-no-peace-hone-harawira-talks.html
    ….
    “Rayna Fahey (Green Party, Radical Mamma, Pakeha Anarchist) then spoke about decolonisation and anti racism, affirming Indigenous rights is about human rights and respect, “ Respect for people and respect for our environment, and what it means to live up to treaty obligations as a settler.”
    http://uriohau.blogspot.com/2008/02/waitangi-day-kulin-nations-08.html

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  14. trout (904 comments) says:

    The liberals are at it again – giving Hone the space to promote and justify his prejudice. It is in his interests to promote a separatist world view and claim to be misunderstood. Fortunately his particular brand of racism will not stand the test of time; it will be neutralized in the nation’s bedrooms. Unless of course he becomes a latter day Maori prophet and gathers together a malleable group of believers and forms a cult. Mom would not allow it of course; she gets off on being hugger mugger with powerful white people.

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  15. BlairM (2,288 comments) says:

    Harawira has a point about European New Zealanders making an effort to understand Maori culture more. There is a big difference in how a lot of Maori operate, especially rural Maori. The concept of koha – favours for favours – is a big one, and it’s one you constantly have to be conscious of when Maori folk are “nice” to you.

    That said, he could cut us a bit more slack. Much of the problem is that many of these rural communities think they can segregate themselves on the government tit, and these folk get all immersed in Maoritanga and divorce themselves from the 80% of New Zealand which is Pakeha. It’s a nasty byproduct of the Maori renaissance.

    I’ve been in a multicultural marriage, and there needs to be a lot of give and take, which Harawira doesn’t seem to get, because he is so into being Maori, almost in the Parisian “how dare you not be French” sort of way. I don’t think any of this supposed “context” excuses him and his awful remarks. He should grow up and learn some tolerance for cultures that aren’t his own, just as every Pakeha should learn a bit about Maori and how they operate. It’s a two way street, Hone.

    Jack5 – as for Ngai Tahu, they are interbred because Te Rauparaha came down and killed most of them in the 1830s, so they can’t really blame whitey for that. What a murdering bastard that guy was. Died of old age too, apparently. Disgusting.

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  16. lastmanstanding (1,210 comments) says:

    It always amuses me how the Hones of this world are so bloody precious about their ancestry and heritage etc.

    Like they are the only ones with a claim to this.

    Like many WASPs and because my family name is not that common and we were inbreds for generations ( alas I do bare the consquences) I trace my family tree back to 1325 in a straight unbroken line.

    Hone and the Horis just need to get over it put the happenings of 150 plus years ago behind them and MOVE ON.

    The really sad thing is the current generation of young Maori have grown up with a huge sense of entitlement and are struggling to get to grips with thw fact that lifes tough you are what you make of yourself and noone owes you.

    This generation is a sad twisted lot all because we whitey didnt tell Hones Ma and her mates to STFU 30 years ago

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  17. Guy Fawkes (702 comments) says:

    Being form the Northern Hemisphere, this all mystifies me.

    The only thing seems to be apparent, is that these divisions, and partisan positions are just posturing to get more money out of a system that has been wrongful in so many parts, and over generous in others.

    I refuse to get drawn on the arguments, it just seems that it is about MONEY.

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  18. Jcw (98 comments) says:

    What an arrogant SOB! There is nothing I enjoy more than introducing a foreigner to my culture – except exploring new cultures!

    Introducing your culture to others is the greatest way to honour it.

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  19. Steve (4,500 comments) says:

    How do I explain John Hatfield to my Thai friends who are thinking of a visit to NEW ZEALAND?

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  20. pollywog (1,153 comments) says:

    How do I explain John Hatfield to my Thai friends who are thinking of a visit to NEW ZEALAND?

    easy… but dont roll round his place with any of his kids, unannounced and uninvited and expect him to bust out the red carpet treatment complete with happy smiley obsequieous brown faces willing to open up and school you in the customs and protocols of his culture just cos you think you deserve it

    its fairly obvious Hone’s got better things to do with his time than pander to ignorant white mofos who cry racism at every opportunity

    No, it’s too do with race as well. See his comments on pacific islander relationships later in the interview – Bob R

    “…So, that’s the reality but let’s not cry about it. Let’s just live with it. Let’s just move on. I’ve had a couple of my kids come home with Pacific Islanders. No issue at all, for some reason. No. I guess because we are Pacific Islanders ourselves, really.”

    how the hell has that quote got anything to do with race when Pasifikans aren’t a race and Maori are essentially the same people as polynesians/PI’s ?

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  21. Anthony (768 comments) says:

    Who said anything about rolling out the red carpet FFS? Do I get stroppy if a visitor with a different culture comes to my house, do I try teach them about my culture, do I make a big deal about it – No I don’t and that would be the same for about 90 percent of the population I would guess.

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  22. hj (6,380 comments) says:

    Hereeee’s Hone in more context :

    At easter 1998 Harawira gave a history of Maori struggle to the Asia Pacific Solidarity Conference in Sydney;
    “The Maori population was about 1 million when the Europeans came. We had a stable society with our own social controls, our own conservation methods, our own rules of behaviour towards one another.

    When Pakehas (white people) came, they brought crime and diseases which almost wiped us out. The population dropped to 40,000 between 1800 and 1900. More died from disease than the big wars we had with the Pakehas. The population is now around 500,000-600,000.”
    http://newzeal.blogspot.com/search?q=Hone+Harawira

    ‘could be what they mean when they say “we don’t know enough about our history”?

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  23. hj (6,380 comments) says:

    Do you ever lapse into rationality pollywog?

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  24. hj (6,380 comments) says:

    “In the first half of the nineteenth century, however, individual iwi considered carrying their martial culture beyond the shores of New Zealand. At least three expeditions of conquest were planned: to Samoa, to Norfolk Island, and to the Chatham Islands, which did not become part of New Zealand until 1842. All these proposed expeditions were dependent on finding transport to those places: and that meant finding a European ship’s captain whose vessel was available for charter; or it meant Maori commandeering a vessel for the purpose.

    In the event there were no expeditions to Norfolk Island or to Samoa because the necessary transport was not secured. But there was an invasion of the Chathams Islands. Two Taranaki tribes then based in Wellington, Ngati Tama and Ngati Mutunga ki Poneke, hijacked a European vessel in 1835 and had themselves—a total of 900 people—delivered to Chatham Islands. There they takahi’d or walked the land to claim it; ritually killed around 300 Chatham Moriori out of a total of around 1600, and enslaved the survivors—separating husbands from wives, parents from children, forbidding them to speak their own language or practise their own customs, and forcing them to violate the tapus of their culture, whose mana was based on the rejection of violence.

    Was this a superior form of colonisation to that imposed by European on Maori? Did it respect the dignity and customs of the colonised? Did it acknowledge the mana whenua of the tchakat henu or indigenous people of the Chathams? It did not. It was what might now be called an exercise in ethnic cleansing. When Bishop Selwyn arrived in the islands in 1848, it was to discover that the Maori called Moriori “Paraiwhara” or “Blackfellas”; and it was to report that the Moriori population continued to decline at a suicidal rate as a consequence of kongenge or despair. Moriori slaves were not released and New Zealand law was not established on the islands until 1862, twenty years after they had become part of New Zealand. And it is that twenty years of neglect of fiduciary duty on the part of the Crown that is the basis for the Moriori claim to the Waitangi Tribunal, heard in 1994, but still not reported upon. ”
    http://sof.org.nz/origins.htm

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  25. hj (6,380 comments) says:

    Sina read a statement from Te Ata Tino Toa, companera Tia Taurere, “The Tino Rangatiratanga flag symbolises the long tradition of struggle and resistance by Maori against colonisation and the Crown sponsored theft of Maori land and resources. It is a symbol used by Maori who continue to resist the pressures of colonisation and cultural and economic genocide. Such a concept embraces the spiritual link Maori have with ‘Papatuanuku’ (Earthmother) and is a part of the international drive by indigenous peoples for self determination.”

    Sina then set about shattering settler fairytales & mythology reminded the whanau gathered, that the Treaty of Waitangi still remains to be honoured 168 years after its signing. The NZ Settler Governments refused to sign the Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous peoples and the recent human rights abuses of the peoples of Tuhoe by nga poaka on behalf of the NZ settler state.

    Just like the crap served up on here recently on stray alia Day, what is the nz settler state celebrating? We are definitely not celebrating our lack of, Tino Rangatiratanga, Mana Motuhake, Sovereignty or Self Determination. That’s for sure.
    http://uriohau.blogspot.com/2008/02/waitangi-day-kulin-nations-08.html

    rayna fahey a Green Party advisor on Maori issues

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  26. Scott Hamilton (286 comments) says:

    The problem with that Hone is that he thinks too much like a Pakeha!
    http://readingthemaps.blogspot.com/2010/08/hones-racism-was-made-in-europe.html
    Interesting responses under the post, and a discussion of how to interpret the 1835 invasion of Rekohu mentioned here by hj

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  27. pollywog (1,153 comments) says:

    Who said anything about rolling out the red carpet FFS?

    most of y’all expect that if his kids dragged any ol white trash bogan round his digs he’d be ‘comfortable’ with that, but seriously, would you be ?

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/4000714/Meet-the-whanau-the-perils-of-dating-a-Harawira

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  28. Craig Ranapia (1,912 comments) says:

    So, the “added context” is that Harawira isn’t just a racist, but he’s proud of his ignorance and intolerance and thinks the rest of the universe should indulge it? Wow.

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  29. hj (6,380 comments) says:

    “Interesting responses under the post, and a discussion of how to interpret the 1835 invasion of Rekohu mentioned here by hj”

    Reading The Maps:
    “The huge slave raids of the Musket Wars period occurred because white colonists in cities like Sydney, Port Nicholson, and even San Francisco had created a market for exports of agricultural products. The conquerors of the Moriori put their subjects to work growing spuds for Pakeha, who didn’t complain about their methods.

    In the same way, the ruthless wars the colonists and the British Empire waged against Maori later in the nineteenth century – wars which featured massacres of civilians at places like Rangiaowhia, and outright genocide in the Ureweras, where General Whitmore’s expedition tore up crops and torched villages to create mass starvation at the end of the 1860s – were motivated by economic forces, not by some inherent evil in Pakeha society. The conquest and expropriation of the Maori was our local equivalent of the enclosures of the Scottish highlands – it was motivated by profit, and was a part of the establishment of capitalism here. ”
    ============
    I just thought I’d check that out by a google and found this.

    “Potato Wars

    Some historians have suggested a more accurate name for these battles would be the Potato Wars, due to the revolution the potato brought to the Māori economy. Potatoes were introduced to Māori in 1794, becoming a key staple with better food-value for weight than kūmara (sweet potato), and easier cultivation and storage. Unlike the kūmara, potatoes were tillable by slaves and women and this freed up men to go to war. The result was a logistical revolution; potatoes effectively fuelled the long range taua that made the ‘Musket Wars’ so different from any fighting that had gone before. Slaves brought back from these massive raids were put to work tending potato patches, freeing up labour to create even larger taua. This can be seen in the progressive size of the war parties which started at around a hundred but within a few years were often a thousand toa (warriors) and up to two thousand. After 1832 the average size of the taua declined, until by 1836 they were as small as 120-200. The missionaries at Tauranga in 1839 recorded that 170 Ngati Haua Toa in five waka went to attack Maungatapu Pa.(Crosby P 338) As well, the duration of the raids were longer by the 1820s; it was common for men to be away for up to a year. Because potatoes are not as sensitive to temperature in the “winterless” north as kūmara, it was easy to grow a series of crops. Also American sailors had reintroduced the much larger fist-sized, American sweet potato, which quickly replaced the thumb-sized “Māori” Kūmara. The availability of the potato and its ease of growing in a wide variety of climatic and soil conditions may have led to a rise in population, putting increasing pressure on a traditional Māori tribal structure that was geared towards a very tiny increase in population, i.e., far more healthy vigorous young men in the pā to challenge for positions of leadership.”
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musket_Wars

    here’s another view: The Chatam “Myth”
    [Ranginui Walker (1994,2000) Pengiun "Ka Whawhai Tonu Matou Struggle without End" pp 39-43 "The Moriori Myth"]

    “Underlying the myth of the fleet is the two-strata theory for the settlement of New Zealand … tinged with overtones of Eurpopean supremicist notions grounded in Darwinian social evolutionist theory …

    “The discovery of the Chatam Islands by Captain Broughton in 1791 had devistating consequences for the Moriori. European diseases such as measles and influenza reduced the population by a fifth. The extermination of the seals by European hunters cut off the basic food supply of the Moriori causing a further decline in numbers. Then in 1835, Taranaki tribes displaced by the musket wars of the previous decade invaded the Chatam Islands in search of land for themselves. The Moriori population at the time was estimated at 1,663; the invaders killed a futher 226 Moriori. The cumulative impact of these events demoralised the Moriori.” …

    … “The myth of the Moriori is essentially ideological in the sense of being a false consciousness as a solution in the mind to conflict generated by the coloniser’s expropriation of Maori land. According to the myth, the Maori, as a superior and more warlike people, expropriated the land from the Moriori. Therefore Pakeha expropriation of the same land on the basis of their superior civilization was in accordance with the principle of the survival of the fittest. For that reason the false myth of the Moriori has been one of New Zealand’s most enduring myths. Pakeha need the myth for the endorsement of colonisation and Pakeha dominance.”

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  30. hj (6,380 comments) says:

    With regard to Ranginui Walkers claim
    “The extermination of the seals by European hunters cut off the basic food supply of the Moriori causing a further decline in numbers. ”
    hmmmmmm?

    “Māori sealing

    It seems likely that before the arrival of Polynesians, between 1250 and 1300 AD, New Zealand fur seals and to a lesser extent sea lions and elephant seals were widespread around the coast. They were an obvious prey for Māori. As the naturalist Johann Reinhold Forster recorded, seal meat was ‘a most excellent & palatable food; by far more tender, juicy & delicate than beefstakes’.1 In addition, seal teeth were valuable for fish hooks.
    In the first two centuries of settlement, Māori were more often seal hunters than moa hunters. There is evidence of extensive sealing in the far north, Coromandel, Taranaki, Cook Strait, the Canterbury coast and the south from Waitaki to Fiordland. However, by the 1700s seals were confined to the far south”
    http://www.teara.govt.nz/EarthSeaAndSky/HarvestingTheSea/Sealing/1/en

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