Gillard hits the spot

February 17th, 2011 at 10:00 am by David Farrar

The Herald has an extract from ’s speech. Absolutely hits the spot. What a shame the bllocked her from actually addressing Parliament, and having these wonderful words recorded in Hansard:

“Our founders could not have imagined the extraordinary events that would bring our nations far closer than any words or any laws.

Not forged in meeting rooms by old men wearing suits.

But by young men in trenches wearing slouch hats and lemon squeezers.

That is why I say Australia has many alliances and friendships around the world.

Economic and defence partnerships of every kind.

But New Zealand alone is family.

When those 29 men never came home from the Pike River mine, we didn’t just mourn for the two Australians.

We mourned for them all. Family.

When Pike River exploded, New Zealand didn’t have to ask Australia to send help.

We just did.

And when natural disasters hit Australia this summer, New Zealand didn’t need to be asked to lend a hand.

You just did.

And our gratitude is boundless.”

A great speech.

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48 Responses to “Gillard hits the spot”

  1. Manolo (13,746 comments) says:

    What did Aussie Norman have to say? The Luddites made an awful blunder by blocking her speaking to Parliament.

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  2. Redbaiter (13,197 comments) says:

    “A great speech.”

    Disagree. IMHO it was banal rubbish and Gillard is one of the most shameless and cynical political opportunists I have seen in a while. She is a completely unconvincing insincere sham and probably the worst PM Australia has ever had.

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  3. big bruv (13,884 comments) says:

    Like it or not Gillard is right, the Aussie’s are family and like a lot of families there is often a bit of rivalry.

    The sooner so many Kiwis drop their pathetic anti Aussie mentality the better.

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  4. RightNow (6,994 comments) says:

    “and having these wonderful words recorded in Hansard”
    Where they can sit alongside the puerile and juvenile barbs slung between parties with the emotional intelligence of street-kids?

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  5. Pete George (23,559 comments) says:

    Sounds good (on paper/screen). As well us being “family” a lot of Kiwi family are in Aus too, 2/3 of my kids have been visiting and are going back to work there soon. This is very common now, Aus is not much different to Auckland.

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  6. MyNameIsJack (2,415 comments) says:

    For fuck’s sake, can we get over this bullfuckingshit that nations are “forged in war”.

    But by young men in trenches wearing slouch hats and lemon squeezers.

    Who were sent there by old men, wearing suits, in meeting rooms.

    Just shows how far Labor has drifted from its roots.

    It was the honourable men of the ALP who opposed WW1 conscription, ulimately forcing Billy “the rat” Hughes out, after the Australian people twice rejected conscription when put to a referendum.

    WW1 was never about freedom and democracy, it was an internicene war about trade.

    It is this type of idiotic remark that fuels the next generation of young men to be sacrificed on the altar of old men’s vanities.

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  7. 3-coil (1,219 comments) says:

    So the first alien has spoken in our parliament? I’m not convinced – just looked like an iguana with a ginger wig.

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  8. nasska (11,473 comments) says:

    big bruv @ 10.12am

    I haven’t seen a lot of serious “anti Aussie mentality”. New Zealanders tend to measure their wealth & success (or lack thereof) using Australia as a yardstick. Somethings grate such as their sporting achievements; their wont of forming words in their noses as opposed to their mouths spring to mind.

    For all that as Gillard’s speechwriters observed there is a familial aspect to our relationship. Disputes are more those of a sibling rivalry & when the chips are down we work well together.

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  9. ben (2,379 comments) says:

    Nice words.

    However, I have to say, announcing a century long ban on apple inports that has wasted the time of thousands of people and cost both countries millions of dollars by laughing about it, as Gillard did, was in poor taste. Actually, it isn’t funny, Julia. Not funny at all.

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  10. side show bob (3,660 comments) says:

    Well she is hardly going to stand up in our parliament and call us a bunch of fly blown, two bob, drongos. Her speech was probably standard issue for such an event. More a speech of good manners rather then the hard truth. She should really have said we are fast becoming a third world socialist cesspit and when her countrymen aren’t laughing at us they are usually pitting us.

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  11. redeye (629 comments) says:

    As someone who holds both Kiwi and Aussie citizenship can I say that gave me shivers.

    And now that I see redbaiter is annoyed by it I’m optimistic about a really great day ahead.

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  12. big bruv (13,884 comments) says:

    nasska

    You are right when you say the anti Aussie thing is a result of our long losing streak on the sports field, the problem is that many Kiwis use this as a basis for disliking everything Australian.

    The fact of the matter is this, the reason so many Kiwis are anti Aussie is because they are miles better than us at almost everything they do.

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  13. redeye (629 comments) says:

    Who were sent there by old men, wearing suits, in meeting rooms.

    As were the Aussies.

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  14. BeaB (2,123 comments) says:

    But here in NZ the conchie Peter Fraser drew the first ball in the ballot to send our dads to war. And look at Helen Clark’s excitement about war graves, cenotaphs and Gallipoli. A bit odd that.

    As for the Aussies, I am the only member of my family still lviing here and I, sadly, left it too late. But most of my business is in Australia.

    And, when I look back, I see lots of great aunts and uncles living there or moving back and forth.

    We are still in their Act of Federation. I have always thought we should make it official even if it means I will make less money.

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  15. davidp (3,581 comments) says:

    Did Gillard take Norman’s flag?

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  16. Jeff (11 comments) says:

    There is no doubt in my mind that was a top speech. Key’s reply by comparison, seemed trite and stale. As for the Goffanator, i watched him for a minute and then realised that i had some paint to watch dry.

    I wouldn’t mind some serious headway being made during the Nats second term, on a single currency. A borderless region is a good step, but is all together too little.

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  17. kowtow (8,439 comments) says:

    Bullshit speech and most people know that.

    Family my arse. Previous Aussie govt put NZers on a par with other immigrants to a great extent. Fair enough ,but not how you treat family or mates. If she means it repeal that law and stop talking apples which was forced on them.

    Gallipoli, more empty rhetoric. What about ANZUS and us not keeping up our end?

    Empty, meaningless, touchy, feel good rubbish from a lefty feminist.

    Don’t get me wrong I think Aussie is great and Aussies have a lot going for them but this is just bollocks.

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  18. YesWeDid (1,048 comments) says:

    ‘But by young men in trenches wearing slouch hats and lemon squeezers.’

    Is Gillard romanticizing war? The reality was young men dying in their tens of thousands from poisonous gas and shrapnel.

    I’m with kowtow and calling bullshit on this.

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  19. MyNameIsJack (2,415 comments) says:

    kowtow (938) Says:

    February 17th, 2011 at 11:02 am
    What about ANZUS and us not keeping up our end?

    What about it? The Seppos didn’t keep up their end either. The one time they were called upon under ANZUS, they declined. Harold Holt may well have said “All the way with LBJ”, whereas LBJ simply said “Fuck off, Noddy”.

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  20. kowtow (8,439 comments) says:

    MNIJ

    Yeah and fuck you too.

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  21. Kermadec (22 comments) says:

    >> “…And when natural disasters hit Australia…”

    …New Zealanders owning homes in the Brisbane flood disaster area were not eligible for relief payments.

    Nice speech though.

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  22. Ed Snack (1,872 comments) says:

    As for the “old men in suits”, when we talk of WW1 it is well to remember that Great Britain (and with her the Empire/Commonwealth) were responding to German aggression. Of course many people may well argue that we’re better to submit to military overlordship from foreigners, but I remain to be convinced that not fighting WW1 in some form was a realistic option, and if it was would German hegemony under the Kaiser have been worth enduring ?

    Of course WW1 was the end result of relatively recent inter-european rivalries, but at the time many of the people on all sides didn’t see the prospect of war as an entirely bad thing. Culturally things were a little different then compared to now. It was no doubt an utter disaster on many levels, but the argument that it was readily avoidable is not, tomy mind, convincing. WW1 didn’t have to break out, the proximate cause, the assassination of the crown prince of the Austro-Hungarian empire by Serbian nationalists resulted in an ultimatum from AH to Serbia couched in terms so severe that it is fair to say that the AH’s assumed it would be rejected and thus give them a cassus belli. In fact Serbia acquiesced and agreed, but AH went to war anyway. The Russians authorized a partial mobilisation in support, and that triggered the German declaration of war, on Russia and France. Britain was only dragged in once the Germans invaded Belgium on route to France, three days after the war as such started. So it seems pretty clear that Germany was intent on war at any cost, and that once declared that they would immediately invade France and attempt to subdue them before the Russians could intervene effectively.

    There seems little doubt that without the British and empire, the French would have lost fairly quickly, possibly immediately, maybe in a year or so. Britain was not obligated to intervene, they could have abrogated their treaty with Belgium and they had no binding agreements with France or Russia, Britain declared war on Germany not vv. But what’s Britain’s position then in 1916-17or so, Germany dominates all of Europe, has possession of Belgium and significant parts of France, especially the coastal regions including Brest & Cherbourg, and Britain is without significant allies. Britain is also marked as untrustworthy, she broke treaties (with Belgium), and allowed France to be overrun despite unofficial but none the less reasonably clear understandings that she would stand with France against external aggression. Now Germany, not content with Frances colonies, wants more…

    To stop this becoming an essay, I believe that WW1 was a tragedy but one most probably bound to happen given the social and cultural milieu of Europe of the end of the 19th century. Once in, I don’t think it is easy for NZ or Australia to stand back and wash their hands of participation. Once in, it was certainly a transformative experience, and I think rightly recognized as such.

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  23. gravedodger (1,566 comments) says:

    As the world goes global, the UN continues to be irrelevant and with threats to our trade and our way of life we will need every friend we can sit with and Australia is the best bet by far.
    As the UK and Western Europe increasingly slide into chaos with the barely restrained immigration and allied cultural destruction we have increasing vulnerability to our survival.
    I was quaintly amused when the Poms were winning the ashes how so many rejoiced at the decline in the fortunes of the baggy greens. Beating Australia is the pinnacle for a NZ sportsman but just as siblings come to your aid when defeat threatens and familial squabbles are temporarily submerged, so it was for me during the “ashes”.
    Yes the speech was a well written bunch of words but there were underlying truths and enough pragmatic signs for me to be reassured by our big brother who lives barely 1000 miles away, who although will give us a bash for no reason than he is a brother it seems he will still give us a hand if another bully calls.

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  24. Bob R (1,370 comments) says:

    ***But by young men in trenches wearing slouch hats and lemon squeezers.

    That is why I say Australia has many alliances and friendships around the world….

    But New Zealand alone is family.***

    For that to remain the case Gillard needs to ensure that Australia does not become majority Muslim.

    “By mid-century Islam will be the majority religion of Austrians under the age of 15. In Brussels, most births are to Muslims and have been since 2006. In France, one in 10 people are Muslims, but they are one in three of those entering their child-bearing years, and Muslims have three times as many children as other French.”

    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/opinion/uncontrolled-muslim-influx-a-threat/story-e6frg76f-1225792231126

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  25. KH (695 comments) says:

    Don’t forget that when the States joined in Federation about 100 years ago that NZ had more natural reason to belong to that group than say Western Australia. And a lot of those natural reasons remain.

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  26. TripeWryter (716 comments) says:

    I felt pleasantly surprised by Gillard’s speech. I hadn’t expected to. Whenever I’ve seen her on Aussie TV I’ve felt she was shallow, wooden, and too nakedly ambitious. And that bloody accent.

    But as I watched yesterday I felt she was being sincere, and that she meant what she was saying. She and her speechwriters and researchers had done well — laid on the things that Kiwis feel good about, but she seemed to convey a respect for us that has been missing from Aussie leaders for some time. And she came with something that she knew would be well-received here: the end of the apple ban.

    We’ll see if the actions match the nice words.

    It’s easy to dismiss WWI as being ‘a family war’, ‘a trade war’, ‘and being nothing to do with freedom and democracy’.

    Britain got into it because Belgium was invaded. Britain was a guarator of Belgium’s sovereignty. Even the Belgians were entitled to protection from hordes goose-stepping across their border.

    Belgium’s sovereignty was violated because a former Chief of the German General Staff, Graf von Schlieffen, had determined that ‘Little Belgium’ was to be the pathway for his right-hook plan to knock out France before the troops had to be railed east to confront the Russian hordes.

    We — New Zealand — were part of the British empire. It would have been inconceivable for us to stay out of it.

    In 1940 neutral Belgium was again necessary to the success of Germany’s panzer Blitzkrieg into France to outflank the fixed forts and tank traps of the Maginot Line. Now, the main weight of the assault came out of Luxembourg, another neutral country that the Germans deemed essential to their plan’s success. Neutral Holland was invaded to secure the offensive’s right flank.

    Neutral Norway was invaded before the British could do so because the Germans needed to secure their right flank, safeguard the ore shipments from the north, and have a coastline that now extended the Royal Navy in the north.

    And to get to neutral Norway the Germans had to invade neutral Denmark.

    Twice in both wars the German Navy reached New Zealand.

    I know it is fashionable in western Europe these days to sneer at the American, British, and Canadian efforts to liberate them, but back in the 1940s I don’t think too such a sentiment was all that common.

    It is disturbing, I think, how people will often dismiss wars to liberate people — particularly of small countries — as being not worth it. Wars such as the Falklands. Or even Kuwait.

    In 1938 the so-called Great Powers left Czechoslovakia to be swallowed up by Germany. Chamberlain had dismissed Czechoslovakia as being a little country of no consequence.

    In 1968 the so-called Great Powers determined that the Czechs trying to thow off some of their communist shackles were’t worth a nuclear war.

    I am often amused, as well, by those who support peace at any cost yet support so-called ‘wars of liberation’, especially if they’re fought by ‘people’s democratic popular socialist fronts’ and the like.

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  27. cabbage (455 comments) says:

    ^^^ Mint Post.

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  28. DJP6-25 (1,387 comments) says:

    Belgium is one of the easiest invasion routes to France. That’s why it has seen so many wars fought on it’s soil. Also, Antwerp is an excellent naval base. From about 1700 to 1945, it was received wisdom that if a hostile power controlled Antwerp, the Royal Navy would have to be kept on a war footing. Which would be ruinously expensive in peace time. That’s part of the reason Britain guaranteed Belgium’s neutrality in 1839.

    cheers

    David Prosser

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  29. Paul Williams (878 comments) says:

    It is a good speech and contrary to the points above, kiwis living in Australia generally feel like part of the place and vice versa. I have.

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  30. Spoff (275 comments) says:

    The speech will go down in History. Not since the days of the lemon squeezers she referenced has more puerile jingoism been so buttered with false sentiment and delivered in a more moronic style. A potent emetic from Australia’s most unpopular PM ever.

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  31. kowtow (8,439 comments) says:

    The Germans refer to 1888 as the year of the three emperors.
    Germany was a power in Europe and Britain was reasonably happy with that.
    Frederick III succeded his father in 1888, he was a liberal and married to Queen Victorias’s daughter,also Victoria,she too was a liberal. Fred was sick and ruled for only 99 days.Died of throat cancer.
    His son Wilhem II took over and wanted “a place in the sun”.Also a powerful navy.Supported the Boers in southern Africa. He dropped Bismarck as his Chancellor and got very involved in domestic politics.He also had his eyes on the Ottoman Empire thus the involvement in Turkey.
    France , Britain and Russia threatened by an aggressively expansionist Germany formed their system of alliances and once mobilisation started after that fateful day in Sarajevo, the rest as they say is history.

    Had Frederick survived the world might have been a very different place.

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  32. RightNow (6,994 comments) says:

    Impressive that this thread has lasted the whole day without anyone bringing up the G Spot.

    First!

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  33. Bevan (3,924 comments) says:

    A potent emetic from Australia’s most unpopular PM ever.

    Steady on guv! She ain’t yet plumbed to the depths of the pompous Mr KRudd.

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  34. Spoff (275 comments) says:

    Just wait a week or two

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  35. Shunda barunda (2,983 comments) says:

    Why the hell should she have said this in session? I have good friends, but I sure as shit don’t like them ruffling around in my bedroom.
    Time and place people.

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  36. Bevan (3,924 comments) says:

    Why the hell should she have said this in session? I have good friends, but I sure as shit don’t like them ruffling around in my bedroom.

    Yes, because a bedroom is comparable to a cess pool of vitriolic hatred.

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  37. Shunda barunda (2,983 comments) says:

    Are you so dull child?

    May you be endowed with wisdom and understanding.

    amen

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  38. tvb (4,416 comments) says:

    The words can be placed into Hansard with the leave of the House. I challenge the Greens to oppose that. It was an historic address with words of warmth that will resonate. The expression “family” I think touched the right spot.

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  39. Bevan (3,924 comments) says:

    Are you so dull child?

    May you be endowed with wisdom and understanding.

    Nah Shunda – your analogy just sucked, that’s all.

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  40. Shunda barunda (2,983 comments) says:

    No it didn’t.

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  41. Bevan (3,924 comments) says:

    Well thats a sterling fucken argument you’ve put up there…

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  42. Shunda barunda (2,983 comments) says:

    yes it is.

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  43. Bevan (3,924 comments) says:

    No, it wasn’t.

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  44. Shunda barunda (2,983 comments) says:

    It could be….

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  45. Nookin (3,341 comments) says:

    ..or not as the case may be

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  46. reid (16,442 comments) says:

    For fuck’s sake, can we get over this bullfuckingshit that nations are “forged in war”.

    No and we never will MNIJ for you see you fool, war is the expression of every single emotion to its most intense degree and there is nothing repeat nothing that even approaches that for human experience as a social phenomena of the collective: i.e. national, mind.

    I would have thought as a serious lefty you would have known that already for such concepts are critical to social manipulation. Are you really a lefty, MNIJ? Does your heart not bleed and your compassion overfloweth?

    If you saw a starving beggar gently holding a kitten in pain with a broken leg, who would you help first?

    Think carefully MNIJ. If you really are a lefty, you’ll know the correct answer, and so do we.

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  47. Luc Hansen (4,573 comments) says:

    Absolutely hits the spot.

    Absolutely, if eurocentrism is your thing.

    Especially when

    Our founders could not have imagined the extraordinary events that would bring our nations far closer than any words or any laws.

    Our founders

    ??? Those white racist bastards who killed, dispossessed and marginalised our indigenous peoples?!!!!

    Yes, I did notice the absolute lack of mention of the fate of the indigenous people of both countries in DPF’s extract.

    I haven’t read the whole speech, though.

    Were indigenous people mentioned at all? Or was it just a white people’s love fest.

    And yes, I have heard of our Maori Battalion.

    Gillard’s speech, certainly the extract posted here, just shows why indigenous people worldwide have to battle so hard for their rights after those rights have been abrogated by…us.

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  48. Luc Hansen (4,573 comments) says:

    hmmm

    what happened to the editing function in Safari. Or has it just disappeared?

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