Mana Party

November 30th, 2011 at 10:00 am by David Farrar

MPs in

None new

MPs out

None out

Result

3.5/10.

Harawira retained his seat of Te Tai Tokerau, but only received 43% of the candidate vote, which is far from an overwhelming mandate. Hone will be pleased that Kelvin Davis is out of Parliament, as a Davis candidacy in 2014 on the back of three years in the shadow cabinet could have been formidable.

Mana had hopes for Sykes in Waiariki but Te Uroroa Flavell retained his seat with a majority twice as large as Hone’s in te Tai Tokerau.

On the party vote, Mana needed around 1.2% to gain a second seat, but got 1.0%. 5,000 more party votes would have been enough.

If you look at the seven Maori seats, Mana got 13% of the party vote and 21% of the electorate votes. This suggests a significant failure to attract widespread support from Maoridom. 71% of their total party vote support was from the seven Maori seats, and 29% from the 63 general seats which is an average 92 votes per seat.

Challenges

Being a sole MP in Parliament can be very lonely. You get one primary question during question time every month, and your press releases are competing with 120 others.

Setting up a new party motivates supporters and activists, as does the election. The challenge now is relevance. What will Mana argue that Labour and the Greens will not? The re-election of a National-led Government pretty much settles the foreshore and seabed issue.

The pending retirements of Sharples and Turia may provide opportunities for Mana with those seats, but one would have to think Labour are more likely to win them, based on the 2011 results.

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15 Responses to “Mana Party”

  1. adze (1,942 comments) says:

    I think Key’s decision to include the Maori Party in government, while moderately unpopular for National supporters and significantly unpopular with MP supporters, remains his most savvy political decision. The more high quality Maori Party gains won at the cabinet table, the less steam more radical politicians like Harawira will have behind them. This is better for all, because while anger and passion might win admiration and respect among like-minded people, it doesn’t necessarily translate into intelligent and competant governance.

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  2. JamesS (352 comments) says:

    I am curious to know what the staffing budget is for the Mana party, how many staff at parliament is Hone entitled to now? does anyone know? (same for Banks and Dunne)

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  3. 3-coil (1,203 comments) says:

    It is little consolation that “only” 1% of the voters can bring themselves to support and vote for a racist glob of slime like Hone Harawira. That is still a lot of “haters and wreckers” (as Clark would have labelled them).

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  4. Elaycee (4,322 comments) says:

    The 1% Mana Party showing is no surprise – they were only ever going to attract support from dissidents and malcontents anyway.

    With the likes of Sykes / Minto / Bradford tagging onto Hawawira’s coat tails (and a distinct lack of fiscal nous between them), it was always going to be unlikely that this ragtag bunch would ever be elected.

    In fact, had Davis not been hobbled by an appalling campaign courtesy of the chief Labour muppet Mallard, he could have won the TTT seat instead of the Mofo Poobah.

    Mana would have then become extinct. :D

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  5. Ross Miller (1,676 comments) says:

    Interesting comments by Elaycee. I have no doubt that Kelvin Davis could have won Te Tai Tokerau this time round if Labour hadn’t set out ‘deliberately’ to hobble him. They hit him with the double whammy.

    The first was their proposed scrapping of Puhoi to Wellsford ‘super highway’ (Labour’s holiday highway). For Northlanders this is not a holiday highway. It is our economic highway and the contempt Labour showed for the people of Northland, Maori and Pakeha alike, translated into Strike One against Davis.

    Strike 2 was Labour’s proposal to raise the age for NZ Super to 67. Pretty hard for Kelvin to sell that to his Maori male constituents with an average life expectancy of just 70.4 years.

    Strike 3 … look at the result.

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  6. Elaycee (4,322 comments) says:

    @Ross Miller: Exactly. :)

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  7. Ed Snack (1,773 comments) says:

    Also reflects the tribal nature of Maori politics. Hone won his seat I suggest because he is a Hawariwa and not because of any policies or other considerations. Hone’s mother is still the key figure in Northland Maori politics, it is a brave person who goes against her and her family. Name and local status are very important in the Maori seats, look at another Tirakatene winning their seat.

    It isn’t the policies, it’s the people, and that limits Mana because first their policies are relatively far left and so lack broad support anyway, and second bacause outside Northland Ngapuhi in general and the Hawariwa’s in particular, are not popular. They would need a good alliance with another family or faction to extend their influence, and so far that hasn’t looked very likely. Minto, Bradford et al are no substitute but simply coat clingers. They would be relatively unpopular I would think in Maori circles anyway.

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  8. KevinH (1,142 comments) says:

    @Adze
    There is nothing “savvy” about Key including the Maori Party in the coalition. It would be stupid of him not to, with the slim majority the Nats have political idealism gives way to political pragmatism. Both parties have worked together and know each other and by renewing their past relationship Key can be assured of pressing on with his agenda with confidence.
    Mana have more in common with Labour than the Maori Party therefore Mana will be aligning itself with Labour’s agenda this term informally. Mana has the edge that Labour is lacking in it’s makeup, and the relationship would be beneficial to both.

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  9. tvb (4,234 comments) says:

    Harawira did better than the Act party and harawera himself showed a great deal of maturity in the campaign. Your 3.5/10 is a bit low. I think he did quite well and pebbly listened to mccarten’s advice. I think 5.5/10 better represents things.

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  10. Elaycee (4,322 comments) says:

    “Harawira did better than the Act party”

    Ahem…. ACT will be on the Treasury benches whilst Hone will be in opposition (again). John Banks (ACT) will most likely be a Cabinet Minister. Hone will still be in the back row at the movies.

    Besides, McCarten would have / should have devoted his energies to returning the PAYE funds he stole from the IRD, than trying to offer any political advice to the leader of the MoFo party.

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  11. adze (1,942 comments) says:

    KevinH
    I was referring to Key’s initial decision to include the MP back in 2008, when his majority in parliament was stronger, and when the decision to include them was less intuitive because of that and the untried relationship. Obviously it would be stupid for him to snub them after such a positive experience last time and with a smaller majority in 2011.
    Mana has more in common with Labour? How? Bearing in mind Labour’s largely centrist outlook (their unionist influence is more recent but I’m sceptical that even this comes close to Mana, which is more of a polar opposite to ACT than a centre left party like Labour).

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  12. Mark (1,406 comments) says:

    Elaycee (1,797) Says:
    November 30th, 2011 at 10:25 am
    The 1% Mana Party showing is no surprise – they were only ever going to attract support from dissidents and malcontents anyway.

    Now the very same could be said of ACT if 1% is your objective criteria not to mention United Future

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  13. gingercrush (153 comments) says:

    Well one thing is for sure. Sue Bradford contributed nothing. And Minto did reasonly well for electorate votes but they didn’t translate into party votes. Not a surprise though. Waitakere and Manukau East were entirely the wrong electorates for those two to stand in. Manukau East voters are way too loyal to Labour. And Waitakere is a very split electorate with low income voters sticking to Labour as South Aucklanders do.

    I suggest Mana targets some of that Green vote in the urban swing electorates. Middle class electorates and target those voters that will become increasingly weary of the Green vote as the Green party becomes ever more mainstream.

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  14. wahanui (4 comments) says:

    I guess my thoughts on all of this is that Hone was kicked out not to long b4 the elections,he had a wide area to canviss and no money he got 1% ACT United First had alot of help and money from the tax payers Im sure to fund their campaign.

    If Hone can run a campaign ion the sniff of an oily rag then why shouldnt this set a precedence.

    If these low lives want to run this country then they shouldnt be using tax funds.

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  15. wahanui (4 comments) says:

    And for the first time in kiwi history did you get a National Party or Labour for that matter supporting the opposition in a bid for a seat. Go Hone we scum of the earth love you and these scavengers can go scavenge on their own corps.

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