No recovery for Pike

May 30th, 2012 at 2:27 pm by David Farrar

Stuff reports that the families of those who died in the mine explosion have accepted it would risk further people dying to attempt a recovery of the bodies.

This is very sad for the families concerned but there may be a silver lining in that they will at least have some certainity. It is good that Solid Energy arranged for them to talk through all the issues around any recovery with the experts.

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5 Responses to “No recovery for Pike”

  1. Pete George (23,682 comments) says:

    It’s sad, but surprising it has taken this long to come to this decision. It would have been easier for families to deal with it if early on they were told it was unlikely bodies could be removed with a reasonable degree of safety but they would explore options.

    Last night Campbell interviewed two men ex mines rescue. Both were grumpy about how things were handled and who was in control, but both seemed to accept that a rescue attempt as too risky at the time. They were more critical of false hope being expressed that men may have survived when it was known early that deaths were almost certain within a shortish timeframe.

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  2. gravedodger (1,569 comments) says:

    The problem arises due almost entirely to the modern communication practice where the facts must be dressed up to deal with sensibility issues

    Hence dogs are Put down or euthanased, not killed.
    People do not die they pass, pass over, go to a better place……….
    people do not take their own life or commit suicide the police merely announce they are not seeking any other person in connection with the death.

    Current Ambulance practice is to be factually accurate in that the patient, in spite of best efforts is dead, no possibility of false hope where none exists.

    I think the police led rescue/ recovery team were far too slow in firstly accepting that fact and secondly failed to convey that assessment to the families.
    I have a little knowledge of blast injury, toxic smoke, superheated air and crush injuries. Those miners were confronted with any and all those so survival was very problematical from the get go. Just consider the state of the two who escaped from the access tunnel a long way from the blast zone Rockwell was lucky, Smith was a miracle.

    I took the doco to say the two miners were not aware of “window opportunity” or rescue possibilities, however they were very critical that the decision making was ultimately in the hands of police who had very limited knowledge and Mine Rescue service that they have walked away from was sidelined. Had an opportunity presented the process would most likely still be debating as it passed by.
    I think their frustration was justified.

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  3. RRM (10,009 comments) says:

    Not wanting to be Mr Insensitive, but FFS at least the families know that the bodies are in the ground.

    Once I’m gone, I’m gone. The last thing I would want is for someone to risk their own perfectly good life bringing my remains back up to the surface for (re)burial.

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  4. cows4me (248 comments) says:

    “The last thing I would want is for someone to risk their own perfectly good life bringing my remains back to the surface”, relax RRM you are probably good on that one. :-)

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  5. KH (695 comments) says:

    Tonight on the radio the family spokesman was complaining that they had not before been told the recovery would be dangerous.
    Seems for him, as the situation evolves, one thing remains, everybody else is still wrong.

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