Working for Maori Youth

May 17th, 2012 at 7:00 am by David Farrar

The Social Service Providers Assn of Aotearoa () has an seminar which may be of interest to some on Wed 30 May.

Working for Maori Youth: Insights from 30 Years of Whakairo and Ta Moko

Speaker: Mark Kopua

Mark Kopua is Te Aitanga a Hauiti, Ngati Ira and Ngati Porou (tribal groups) from the East Coast of the North Island of New Zealand. He is a tohunga (expert) ta moko artist and has been tattooing for around 16 years. Prior to doing ta moko, he did Maori whakairo (carving) for about 35 years.

Mark has been awarded the prestigious Toi Iho Maori mark of excellence in perpetuation, in recognition of his contribution to upholding the mana of traditional and contemporary Maori artforms.

Mark Kopau is an  master craver and ta moko artist and expert on Maori traditional art i.e. he was an expert witness for iwi on the Wai 262 claim, see http://tamokoake.wordpress.com   Mark has worked with disadvantaged Maori youth/apprentices for over 30 years and has some powerful coal face insights about what drives quality education and employment outcomes etc.  

The seminar is at:

St John’s in the City
Wed 30 May
5.30 pm to 7.30 pm

To attend, register with John Dickson, SSPA at info@sspa.org.nz or phone 027 510-1517.

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30 Responses to “Working for Maori Youth”

  1. Dave Mann (1,248 comments) says:

    Bullshit.

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  2. Dick Prebble (60 comments) says:

    What’s bullshit Dave? Are you against people educating others about work opportunities?

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  3. Griff (8,159 comments) says:

    Coal face In sight
    Freudian slip for a piece on a ta moko tohunga

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  4. Tom Barker (145 comments) says:

    A master craver, you say? Does he crave to be mastered, then?

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  5. Griff (8,159 comments) says:

    Yes dick
    there is so much opportunity for graduates with tamoko and carving experience
    You can get a job as——-?
    Almost as useful as waka paddling as a trade

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  6. Dave Mann (1,248 comments) says:

    @Dick
    It’s Bullshit because it’s race based and very probably funded by the earners of society without their knowledge or consent, and the act of deliberately disfiguring yourself will do nothing to ‘help’ you to succeed in life.

    There are other ways that it is bullshit, but these, for brevity’s sake, are the main ones.

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  7. mikenmild (11,662 comments) says:

    You may have missed the tattoo boom and the popularity of designs based on traditional moko. This is an area of art that probably has a good future, both economically and culturally.

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  8. la la land (6 comments) says:

    Well at least this guy has spent his life doing something useful, contirbuting to the Maori cultural revolution and helping young people – he is offering his insights into what has worked for him. Why is this bullshit? You lot are just narrow minded haters. And racist to boot.

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  9. Griff (8,159 comments) says:

    Yes mike there will be a huge growth in plastic surgery when the poor idiots realize that fashion by its very nature changes and if you have scribbles you will look like a reject trapped in the past

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  10. Dave Mann (1,248 comments) says:

    So, DPF, do you think this race based bullshit is the way to educate and enhance young people’s life prospects? Is this the kind of rubbish that you would recommend for your son or daughter? Is this the National Party’s answer to youth unemployment or is somebody just flying a kite to test people’s reactions?

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  11. Manolo (14,030 comments) says:

    Dave is right. This “training” is 100% unadulterated bullshit.

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  12. EverlastingFire (286 comments) says:

    It does seem kind of odd that the best they can come up with is someone who tattoos mokos and carves wood for a living.

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  13. graham (2,346 comments) says:

    meh … doesn’t worry me. Like with teaching Maori in schools, I have no problem if they want to do it. Just don’t force me, or my family to be part of it.

    Look on the plus side – the more people that go to this, the less competition for real jobs when my daughter starts job-hunting :)

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  14. markra (200 comments) says:

    Not sure how putting a picture on ones face adds to getting employment.

    Training in the trades and things of a practical nature surely would help more for getting work .

    That’s why their are problems, their priorities are all wrong.

    I often hear that when young Maori get away from all this garbage and go to Australia, they do well because thy are treated as equal and don’t get patronized and caught in this by sort of rubbish

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  15. markra (200 comments) says:

    @graham

    you said “less competition for real jobs when my daughter starts job-hunting”

    you are definitely right on that, but then your Daughter has to pay high taxes to pay for them on the dole.

    This helps no one

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  16. graham (2,346 comments) says:

    Hmmm … you know how Sue Bradford, Labout et al are frothing at the mouth that contraception for beneficiaries will be compulsory – not officially, but a nod’s as good as a wink to a blind bat, hmmm?

    I wonder if we should start frothing at the mouth and complaining that OBVIOUSLY anyone who wants to work for The Social Service Providers Assn of Aotearoa (SSPA) – although I have no idea what the hell they actually do – or with Maori Youth will OBVIOUSLY be forced to get a compulsory moko. How dare this group interfere with our bodies! Oh no, it’s not official, but a nod’s as good as a wink …

    Could be fun. :)

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  17. dubya (243 comments) says:

    @ Markra;

    No, they go to Australia for the high wages (I hear scaffolding/property investing is a big earner). They still perpetuate the cultural bullshit by getting tattoos and talking about being in touch with their culture. However in reality I suspect getting a sweet ta moko has more to do with getting their end in the young Aussie birds with a touch of the jungle fever.

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  18. RightNow (6,995 comments) says:

    EverlastingFire, “someone who tattoos mokos and carves wood for a living” – that’s craves

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  19. Dave Mann (1,248 comments) says:

    @ marka

    I often hear that when young Maori get away from all this garbage and go to Australia, they do well because thy are treated as equal and don’t get patronized and caught in this by sort of rubbish

    Yes. Well said!

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  20. nasska (11,788 comments) says:

    DPF’s post states that Mr Kopua “has worked with disadvantaged Maori youth/apprentices for over 30 years and has some powerful coal face insights about what drives quality education and employment outcomes etc. “.

    As such he may have picked up a way of connecting with some of the most hard core education & work dodgers in NZ. If waka carving & tattoo design is the conduit then he is well worth listening to. Should these cultural pursuits be pushed as an end to themselves then the seminar is just another opportunity for the Maori elite to push the Pakeha guilt button & collect the cash.

    Unless his seminar contribution is just another whistle stop for the gravy train he may be worth listening to.

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  21. dubya (243 comments) says:

    Craves wood? Does he have pica? I’d watch him eat a waka, could be entertaining.

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  22. MT_Tinman (3,250 comments) says:

    Has this fellow earned a living carving wood or people over his lifetime?

    If so, good on him, his message may be of use.

    If, however, he has spent that time sucking at the taxpayer tit he is still simply wasting time and money.

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  23. graham (2,346 comments) says:

    MT_Tinman: Good point.

    If someone has a skill, and someone is willing to pay him for it, then good on them. Even if I don’t find it interesting or relevant, if someone does then all good (as long as it isn’t a ‘pretend’ work scheme where you and I pay for it because somebody in Government thinks we should keep this ‘valuable heritage’ alive by artificially subsidising it).

    But as I say like with teaching Maori in schools, just don’t force me, or my family to be part of it.

    I’m actually in favour of teaching Maori in schools, alongside other languages. It is an official language, part of this country’s heritage, so it makes sense. What I’m not in favour of is making it compulsory for everyone.

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  24. Bob R (1,387 comments) says:

    I watched ‘The GC’ for the first time last night and while it was your typical reality show, it was refreshing to see the aspirational attitudes of the characters. Guys going over to Oz, getting work and investing in property or setting up a gym. I applaud their attitude.

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  25. Dick Prebble (60 comments) says:

    Just because it’s something that you may disapprove of does not make it bullshit. What if it was a hairdressing course instead? And there’s no evidence that it is taxpayer funded, if it is I would call bullshit as well, but otherwise I think you’re just jumping on the bullshit bandwagon Dave Mann simply because you saw that it was Maori. I for one am glad that at least the guy is doing the seminar to help others like him. If an Asian started up a managing small dairies in NZ seminar for Asians, I doubt you’d call bullshit.

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  26. Dave Mann (1,248 comments) says:

    @ Dick

    Yes, if a person of any race were holding seminars for members of their own race it would also be bullshit. Race-based initiatives and separatism are ruining this country. I also particularly dislike the fact that the ‘skill’ being presented here is to disfigure oneself in the name of some stoneage ‘culture’ and that this idiotic and barbaric practice will not help the poor people who do it to themselves one iota. Quite the reverse, in fact.

    Also, the fact that this turkey was an expert witness for iwi on the Wai 262 claim (whatever the fuck that means), suggests that he is another Maori gravy trainer ripping off the taxpayer along with his own people for whatever he can get out of the limpcock tribalist TOW system.

    There is also the fact that the press release says Mark has worked with disadvantaged Maori youth/apprentices for over 30 years. Does this mean to suggest that having an apprenticeship is somehow perpetuating the ‘disadvantage’ of Maori youth?

    Everything about this bullshit stinks. It stinks of tribalism, racism, government toadying and outright PC idiocy.

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  27. Dave Mann (1,248 comments) says:

    Sorry, my editing failed (bloody phone keypad). I meant to write in my first sentence above “if a person of any race were holding seminars exclusively for members of their own race it would also be bullshit, but at least managing small dairies is a useful occupation.”

    My apologies for not being clear.

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  28. Sam Buchanan (501 comments) says:

    Amazing. Somebody develops a skill in an occupation that is clearly in demand and all the supposed free-marketeers here jump in to slam him for not having the particular skills they’ve decided he ought to have. A lot of people here would vote for Stalin’s reanimated corpse if he promised to suppress Maori culture and practices.

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  29. Dick Prebble (60 comments) says:

    Was about to say the same thing Sam. Yes, dairies are more useful than than tattoos, but if the free market decides to give a tattoo artist money, just as it decides to give a yatch builder money, or a seller of absolutely useless goods, then it is the free market’s right. Just because something is targeted as race, as long as it is not government funded, then it is the free market’s right to decide which demographics it wishes to provide its services to. If a tattoo artist holds a seminar with his own business, it is his right to limit participants to only Maori. If people think it is racist, then the market will naturally fuck him out of business.

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  30. Sam Buchanan (501 comments) says:

    There’s no suggestion whatsoever that the seminar is limited to Maori, or any other group. It’s advertised as open to the public (for a gold coin donation).

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