General Debate 2 April 2013

April 2nd, 2013 at 8:00 am by Kokila Patel
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82 Responses to “General Debate 2 April 2013”

  1. Judith (8,463 comments) says:

    Bruce Hutton Dies

    “The commission report said: “Mr Hutton and Mr [Len] Johnston planted the shell case … and they did so to manufacture evidence that Mr Thomas’ rifle had been used for the killings.”

    Will we ever see the police investigate this case thoroughly. It may have been too long ago to matter to some, but it does to Rochelle Crewe, and it does to people who believe the Police force is there to protect us, not frame us.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10874822

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  2. Pete George (23,353 comments) says:

    A Herald editorial has burst David Cunliffe’s bullshit bubble:

    Point scoring outbursts will not solve tax conundrum

    Labour’s revenue spokesman, David Cunliffe, was hardly ploughing new ground when he accused Apple, the world’s biggest tech company, of failing to meet its tax obligations in New Zealand.

    The issue has become a magnet for opportunist politicians eager to score easy points. Multinationals like Facebook, Starbucks and Google have all faced similar criticism, not least in Britain and Australia, for structuring their global businesses to minimise tax payments.

    This has prompted the OECD to call for a worldwide crackdown on such behaviour. But it knows, as surely does Mr Cunliffe, that the situation is about far more than simplistic accusations.

    And remember, David’s Clark and Cunliffe, tax isn’t calculated on revenue.

    There is nothing to gain attacking the Government when you shoot your credibility in the foot.

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  3. Colville (2,198 comments) says:

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/8496789/Smelter-firm-subsidy-talks-stall

    Tiwai may close afterall…

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  4. peterwn (3,215 comments) says:

    Colville – it is too early to jump to conclusions. The negotiations are still ‘business as usual’, ‘another day at the office etc’. Goodness knows why some people thinks the Government has already capitulated, etc. Seems Rio wanted to have talks with the Government then found the Government was singing from the same hymn book as Meridian so there was little point with continuing them. Merodian’s board and CEO would be just as tough negotiators as Rio is, and dealing with issues relating to their largest customer would be a fundamental part of Meridian’s business plan and risk assessment policies.

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  5. Cunningham (829 comments) says:

    Any thoughts on this:

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10874812

    Are they likely to do well?

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  6. James Stephenson (2,096 comments) says:

    That’s not exactly the newest of news Cunningham

    http://www.kiwiblog.co.nz/2012/12/focus_nz_party.html

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  7. Judith (8,463 comments) says:

    Cunningham (381) Says:
    April 2nd, 2013 at 8:45 am
    ———————–
    No, I don’t think they will do anything more than split the vote further, with the possible outcome of a 4 party coalition (nightmare)

    Personally I think a party named “none of the above” might actually have more show.

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  8. Cunningham (829 comments) says:

    James Stephenson (1,374) yeah I thought I remembered reading about them a while ago. Surely there are votes for the taking though and I don’t see why they couldn’t take some off NZ First. Will be interesting to see how they do.

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  9. Pete George (23,353 comments) says:

    Cunningham, it’s difficult enough maintaining an existing small party, and far more difficult to establish a new one – it hasn’t been done successfully yet.

    And this seems to be little more than what we already have on offer, except with farming links.

    But if it’s true they have 400 members they must have some credible support.

    Possibly their only real chance is if they are seen and used as a quasi-National support party to give them a semblance of a coalition partner.

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  10. Pete George (23,353 comments) says:

    To address by far the biggest potential voting demographic it’s been suggested an Apathy Party be started up, but no one could be bothered doing anything about it.

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  11. kowtow (7,968 comments) says:

    The Tiwai business is very interesting and to my simple mind is another example of how corrupted modern capitalism has become.

    Big business is no longer interested in doing business on it’s own merits but like our underclasses has got used to putting it ‘s hands out to the govt (taxpayers) and expecting subsidies.

    Govt’s generally come to the “rescue” and have taught big business to keep on with risky practises or enterprises as we’ll always bail them out or see them right.

    The whole system has become corrupted and the victim at the bottom of the pile is the taxpayer and saver.

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  12. All_on_Red (1,489 comments) says:

    Kowtow
    I guess they see everyone else do it and decide, why not them?
    Tolls Kiwirail was another example. Ports of Auckland too maybe- sucking off the ratepayer with its inefficiencies ?
    I think the other danger we have is Big Government where the state is so big it becomes a vested interest and deliberately skews the playing field.
    The left seem to love Big Government. Possibly because of their own vested interests feeding at the trough of public money.
    Ironic really. I bet in the seventies they were the protestors against Big Government. Now they are it.

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  13. Paulus (2,565 comments) says:

    Schools out again today – another day of no teaching.
    Last Thursday my local primary closed at noon, as it was Easter ?
    Tough being a teacher.

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  14. Viking2 (11,284 comments) says:

    Another IT failure.

    Page Not Found

    We’re sorry. The page you’re looking for can’t be found.
    It has either been removed, had its name changed, or is temporarily unavailable.

    Looking for a TelstraClear page? Find out about our changes.
    So, one clicks on find about our changes and

    PAGE NOT FOUND.

    Vodafone of course.
    —————–

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  15. UglyTruth (4,551 comments) says:

    The whole system has become corrupted and the victim at the bottom of the pile is the taxpayer and saver.

    Taxation was originally a form of tribute. It makes no sense to pay tribute to a system that is screwing you.
    If you want a hedge against inflation the maybe real property is a good idea.

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  16. graham (2,292 comments) says:

    WTF?

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/uk-europe/8495166/Vienna-muscles-into-gay-market

    Vienna has joined a growing list of European cities seeking to attract lesbian and gay tourists who are expected to remain willing to spend on travel while other recession-hit travellers cut back.

    City authorities in Vienna this month released a review of the Austrian capital’s gay and lesbian tourism strategy, deciding to focus on travellers interested in music, culture and history – and with money to spend.

    I’m confused. I thought that gays and lesbians were just like us. That they were no different except they happen to fancy the same sex. But other than that, they’re just normal people. So why are cities like Vienna developing a gay and lesbian tourism strategy? Does this mean they’re not the same, after all? Or is it just more PC nonsense?

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  17. Fletch (6,154 comments) says:

    This is going around on Facebook at the moment as the best 7 minutes you will ever watch on gun control.
    Bill Whittle plays the ‘virtual president’ and explains gun control.
    A pity it’s not real – they need telling that.

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  18. Harriet (4,622 comments) says:

    Top stuff Fletch!

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  19. peterwn (3,215 comments) says:

    Contact Energy down 3.5%. Perhaps some investors consider that the Smelter contract could fall over resulting in sharp competition between power companies in lower South Island – Contact owns the two major Clutha stations, hence would have more exposure to a smelter shutdown than Mighty River.

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  20. Pete George (23,353 comments) says:

    I thought that gays and lesbians were just like us.

    Not all “gays and lesbians” are the same, and not all “us”” are the same. And there’s some overlap – I presume some “gays and lesbians” like some classical music and history, like some of “us”.

    But it’s common for tourism promoters to target specifc markets – ie Queenstown targets young adventure tourists, skiers, shoppers, gamblers, wine drinkers, golfers – and they may even have a gay bar or two for those of us who like gay type bars.

    As the article notes the one thing all tourism promoters want to target -”and with money to spend.”

    But, Austrians are conservative, maybe they prefer that gay couples who tour there to be married, they may frown on couples booking into hotels as Mr and Mr Smith.

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  21. HB (298 comments) says:

    http://publicaddress.net/hardnews/done-like-a-dinner/

    interesting post on Rio Tinto and our government

    ” Having correctly calculated that the government cannot risk its asset sales programme, Rio Tinto is playing hardball over the price at which it is willing to strike a deal.”

    “… rather than simply allow Meridian to act in a commercially prudent way, as it is required to under the State Owned Enterprises Act, the government will use taxpayers’ money to directly subsidise Rio Tinto. It’s a horrible precedent.”

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  22. HB (298 comments) says:

    and more

    “And let’s be clear about this: had the Clark government ever behaved in such a cynical, incompetent, nakedly political fashion on the scale that the Key government has here, the Kiwiblog right and the major editorials would have gone absolutely mental about it.

    Unfortunately, this isn’t isolated behaviour. Quite where the current government derives its public reputation for stewardship is more of a mystery than ever.”

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  23. mara (752 comments) says:

    Too many Muslims in Vienna. If I were gay, I wouldn’t go there , “married” or not.

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  24. Pete George (23,353 comments) says:

    HB – except that was yesterday, things have moved on somewhat since then.

    Especially now there is no indication “the government will use taxpayers’ money to directly subsidise Rio Tinto”.

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  25. Elaycee (4,333 comments) says:

    Did anyone else note the April 1st ‘Press Release’ suggesting that the Wellington Phoenix had appointed Gareth Morgan to the role of Technical Director? Whilst the timing of the ‘release’ confirmed it was a sick, April Fool’s joke, the scary part is that if this scenario was actually put to Morgan, he’d probably think he’d be good in the role…

    In direct contrast, I can’t recall ever hearing about Paul and Liz Blackwell (owners of the NZ Breakers) turning up at Breakers training with their clip boards in hand…. they seem to leave the Coach and support staff to look after matters relating to on-court performance.

    One team is a stand out success and the other, a major embarrassment.

    Coincidence? I think not.

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  26. HB (298 comments) says:

    PG

    there is no indication they won’t either.

    concessions from the government AND meridian?

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  27. liarbors a joke (1,069 comments) says:

    meanwhile , back in good old Nil Ziland..

    http://news.msn.co.nz/nationalnews/8635620/islands-maori-names-could-become-official

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  28. Reid (16,111 comments) says:

    On Rio Tinto I suggested last night the govt assists with finding markets for its high-grade output. What would be wrong with enticing this guy to NZ and giving him tax breaks and loans to setup a plant and fund his IP legal costs? Why not do that? Of course it’s picking winners, but that’s precisely what worked for Ireland during the Celtic Tiger years.

    http://www.ukcolumn.org/article/aluminium-fuel-cell-why-government-blocking-it

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  29. All_on_Red (1,489 comments) says:

    At least Rio Tinto would probably be cheaper than Holden. Check this out- note the Union demands.

    General Motors Holden received $2.2 billion in federal handouts over the past 12 years, 50 per cent more than past estimates based on more limited data.

    But Holden argues that taxpayers got value for money.
    Until now it has been thought that each of the three car companies received just over $100 million a year from Canberra.

    Let us look at the Holden Ltd Enterprise Agreement…

    One of the five Agreement Objectives is a requirement to “control costs to increase competitiveness domestically and in overseas markets where structural costs are significantly lower”. But in a stunning contradiction, pay increases of 29.13 per cent are given. Between 1997 and 2010 the company gave pay increases of 63.33 per cent, a median increase of 4.87 per cent a year, hardly appropriate for a struggling business relying on government support.
    A fatuously titled clause, Responding to the Market and Seizing the Opportunity, says the parties have “agreement to ensure that change, productivity and flexibility are efficiently managed and implemented”. Yet the agreement prohibits the company from increasing, decreasing or rearranging the workforce without union approval.
    The company can only hire a casual employee after gaining the agreement of the relevant unions and then only for “agreed numbers”, “agreed specified tasks” and “agreed specified periods”. Anyone who is casual for more than three months automatically becomes permanent…
    If there is need to increase production, the company must in the first instance offer overtime to employees. If it is not taken up, then, provided the unions give permission, the company may use workers from a labour hire company, but only for “specified periods”, and in limited numbers with union agreement required at each stage of the process. Holden cannot choose the labour hire company; they can only use a business selected by the unions.

    http://blogs.news.com.au/heraldsun/andrewbolt/index.php/heraldsun/comments/holden_gets_2_billion_in_handouts_unions_get_a_playground/

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  30. HB (298 comments) says:

    my weekly grocery shopping is cheaper too.
    but hardly relevant.

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  31. SPC (5,473 comments) says:

    The video on gun control reckons they are used to defend prey from predators … forgetting that guns are also the means of some human predators.

    The claim that they defend people from acts of physical violence is only really likely if they are openly displayed. The evidence that more violent deaths occur in homes with guns is “inconvenient”, do they only make people safer in the abstract, when outside the home?

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  32. graham (2,292 comments) says:

    But it’s common for tourism promoters to target specifc markets – ie Queenstown targets young adventure tourists, skiers, shoppers, gamblers, wine drinkers, golfers – and they may even have a gay bar or two for those of us who like gay type bars.

    True, Pete, but the point is that those adventure tourists, skiers, shoppers, gamblers, etc, may well be straight or they may be gays and lesbians.

    We don’t target straight people specifically, why is there this perceived need to target gays and lesbians specifically?

    ** EDIT: What on earth is a “gay type bar”? **

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  33. Kea (11,878 comments) says:

    SPC, I am happy with that line of logic. I suggest the US government lead by example. Compare how many people the “authorities” have killed in past decade, with the random acts of nutters, before replying.

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  34. Pete George (23,353 comments) says:

    graham – some of them could be enticed to spend their tourist dollars with gay targeted marketing, just like many other demographics. But not all gays are the same – and many gays will be attracted to the same sorts of things non-gays are attracted to – ie they are the same as “us”.

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  35. graham (2,292 comments) says:

    Pete – so should we start “straight” targeted marketing? How many people do you think that would appeal to?

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  36. Pete George (23,353 comments) says:

    There’s already a lot of straight targeted marketing. Much of it is not obvious to straights, but some is, for example wedding tourism.

    Re looking at alternative names for North Island and South Island – they are quite boring names, aren’t they.

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  37. graham (2,292 comments) says:

    Pete George:

    There’s already a lot of straight targeted marketing.

    Really? Like what? I’m struggling to think off-hand of any marketing that specifically talks to straight people and aims to attract them purely on the basis of their sexuality, but I’d be interested to know the examples you have in mind.

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  38. graham (2,292 comments) says:

    I see you edited your post after I made my post, Pete.

    Wedding tourism is not targeted at straight people. It is targeted at married people. This is no different to targeting adventure tourists, skiers, shoppers, gamblers, wine drinkers, golfers, as you earlier pointed out. Such people are singled out based on their interests or a significant life event, not on the basis of their sexuality.

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  39. Pete George (23,353 comments) says:

    Wedding tourism targets people wanting to travel to get married, so it isn’t targeting married people. In countries like New Zealand (and I’ve seen it in Fiji, with wedding chapels associated with resorts) that have only allowed hetero marriages it is targeting hetero couples. That may change soon here, a new tourist niche may open up.

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  40. Viking2 (11,284 comments) says:

    I see RIO have gone back to Meridian having been rebuffed by the Govt.
    Good to see some steely backbone at last.
    Just need to see some applied to the Union rort and we will begin to progress a bit.

    The mining giant had withdrawn after nine months of negotiations over possible taxpayer subsidies and had now resumed discussions with state-owned power company Meridian, Prime Minister John Key confirmed this morning.

    It was revealed last week the Government had been negotiating with Rio Tinto over the smelter after contract negotiations between subsidiary Pacific Aluminium and Meridian effectively stalled.

    The Government had made it clear there would be no long-term support, but agreed to look at short term bridging assistance because of the thousands of jobs at stake, and to facilitate a smoother transition should Tiwai Point close, Key told TV3′s Firstline.
    ==========================

    But of course LABOUR are now saying its mismanagement. FFS What would Labour know about management?
    Stupid fucks.

    Labour has accused the Government of total mismanagement over Tiwai Point negotiations, amid news Rio Tinto has walked away from talks.
    =========================
    Key confirmed this morning the Government had no interest in that.

    “If it can’t stand on its own two feet then long term it shouldn’t be there. We do think it made a bit of sense on balance to try and support the process and that’s where we’ve been simply because of the number of jobs involved and power usage.”

    There was now nothing more the Government could do.

    “We put our best foot forward and our only card on the table.”

    Rio had made “lots of money” out of the smelter over the years.
    ===============

    Yep and lost billions in other bad investments and now is struggling to survive.

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/8496789/Smelter-firm-subsidy-talks-stall

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  41. graham (2,292 comments) says:

    Wedding tourism targets people wanting to travel to get married, so it isn’t targeting married people.

    True, if a little pedantic. :) But that proves my point – it is not aimed at straight people based on their sexuality. The fact that currently only straight people can get married in New Zealand does not automatically equate to wedding tourism targeting straight people based on their sexuality.

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  42. dime (9,682 comments) says:

    Willie Jackson on radio live “i can see where scibe is coming from with his jessie ryder comments, i agree with him”. jesus.

    “youll probably find out the two that did the assualt are good buggas and youll be shocked”.

    i guess thats how it is in the maori world? when the stone agers lash out its always a shock lol

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  43. James Stephenson (2,096 comments) says:

    What separates Scribe from Jesse’s attackers, is that Scribe only managed the one hit.

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  44. RRM (9,668 comments) says:

    Well hello there there peeps!

    I see that as usual, everything’s sh!t, everyone’s a c*#t, the left are despicable, the sky is falling and the country is going to hell in a hand cart. It’s another beautiful sunny day on Kiwiblog! :-)

    Here’s something that really is beautiful – The First Day from Haydn’s The Creation.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S03cwGuw43s&feature=share&list=PLC9770AAC09E26423

    Watch out for the massive “and there was LIGHT!<"/b> moment around 2:00, a blaze of fortissimo glory that seems to have all the power of the universe in it, and must have woken up a few parishioners at the premiere…

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  45. KevinH (1,160 comments) says:

    PG, the English names for the north and south islands are most certainly dull and boring, however the Maori names Te Ika Maui and Te Wai Pounamu are more evocative and lend themselves well to tourist literature. Also Aotearoa is widely used in tourist publications and should be more widely used to represent the duality of New Zealand’s heritage.

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  46. dime (9,682 comments) says:

    Te Ika Maui and Te Wai Pounamu also work cause they are harder for whitey to remember.

    I dont mind dual names. I just think the names they chose suck

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  47. graham (2,292 comments) says:

    meh … like many things, I think it comes down to personal preference. Let them assign Maori names if it makes somebody happy, and we can all just use the names we prefer.

    I happen to like the North and South Islands. Don’t know why, they just resonate with me, especially in conjunction with Stewart Island, Waiheke Island, etc.

    I have no problem with the name of Aotearoa, for that matter. But I personally will always refer to my home country as New Zealand.

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  48. RRM (9,668 comments) says:

    I live in the north island. It’s always been the north island to me and it always will be.

    I guess you could say that name is part of my heritage…. Because heritage isn’t something sacred and holy as certain Maori ™ tribe$ want you to think, heritage is just whatever you have…

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  49. Reid (16,111 comments) says:

    In the “gee, who’da thunk” dept:

    http://www.presstv.ir/detail/2013/04/01/296014/cnn-lies-about-iran-syria-exreporter/

    and

    http://www.debka.com/article/22857/Saudi-heavy-weapons-supply-to-Syrian-rebels-breaks-up-Arab-summit-in-uproar

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  50. Fletch (6,154 comments) says:

    Reid, it’s come out now, even in the New York Times, that the U.S was in Libya to supply arms to rebels in Turkey or Syria. That’s likely why Benghazi happened. And Hillary Clinton probably committed perjury when she said she knew nothing about it under questioning from Rand Paul.

    TEL AVIV – Has the White House been misleading the public by repeatedly denying it was coordinating arms shipments to the rebels in Syria, insurgents known to consist in large part of al-Qaida and other jihadist groups?

    Other top U.S. officials and former officials, including former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, have implied in congressional testimony that they didn’t know about any U.S. involvement in procuring weapons for the rebels.

    Now, a starkly different picture is emerging, one that threatens the longstanding White House narrative that claims the Obama administration has only supplied nonlethal aid to the rebels.

    Confirming WND’s exclusive reporting for over a year, the New York Times two days ago reported that since early 2012, the CIA has been aiding Arab governments and Turkey in obtaining and shipping weapons to the Syrian rebels.

    [...]

    Paul asked Clinton: “Is the U. S. involved with any procuring of weapons, transfer of weapons, buying, selling, anyhow transferring weapons to Turkey out of Libya?”

    “To Turkey?” Clinton asked. “I will have to take that question for the record. Nobody has ever raised that with me.”

    Continued Paul: “It’s been in news reports that ships have been leaving from Libya and that may have weapons, and what I’d like to know is the annex that was close by, were they involved with procuring, buying, selling, obtaining weapons, and were any of these weapons being transferred to other countries, any countries, Turkey included?”

    Clinton replied, “Well, Senator, you’ll have to direct that question to the agency that ran the annex. I will see what information is available.”

    “You’re saying you don’t know?” asked Paul.

    “I do not know,” Clinton said. “I don’t have any information on that.”

    http://www.wnd.com/2013/03/new-scandal-threatens-obama-hillary/

    Frickin liars. It’s committing treason also, to supply the enemy. That is probably why no one has been able to question the Benghazi survivors; they’ve been hidden away.

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  51. UglyTruth (4,551 comments) says:

    the U.S was in Libya to supply arms to rebels in Turkey or Syria

    And then Benghazi was blamed on the “Innocence of Muslims” video, which only became widely known after the event.

    The interview of Sibel Edmonds by James Corbett has lots of background on US-Turkey operations and the Muslim Brotherhood.

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  52. Manolo (13,517 comments) says:

    Interesting article: http://www.americanthinker.com/2013/03/the_plo_rewrites_history.html

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  53. Pauleastbay (5,035 comments) says:

    http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/politics/4869602/Bob-Crow-council-house-row.html

    The socialists pin up boy.

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  54. Viking2 (11,284 comments) says:

    I note that all the idle and hopeless must have gone to town to pick up their bene’s today.

    Well, they didn’t spend all day here at KB.

    Waht else would they be doing. Mostly unemployable except for the public service. 8O

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  55. Left Right and Centre (2,887 comments) says:

    Dumb bungas

    Can’t read fucking English on a letterbox.

    So they put shit in your letterbox you don’t want.

    NZ is a letterbox and bungas are junkmail. NZ should have had a no junkmail sign on it.

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  56. Viking2 (11,284 comments) says:

    Now here is a revolutionary idea come to p[ass.

    dime will want to go here.

    Samoa Air has become the world’s first airline to implement “pay as you weigh” flights, meaning overweight passengers pay more for their seats.

    “This is the fairest way of travelling,” chief executive of Samoa Air, Chris Langton, told ABC Radio. “There are no extra fees in terms of excess baggage or anything – it is just a kilo is a kilo is a kilo.”

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/pacific-islands/8498773/Pay-as-you-weigh-fare-takes-off

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  57. liarbors a joke (1,069 comments) says:

    Willie Jackson is an absolute tosspot…

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  58. Viking2 (11,284 comments) says:

    By Gareth Vaughan

    Troubled state owned enterprise Solid Energy is refusing to disclose the names of the holders of NZ$95 million of its debt.

    The company, which has around NZ$389 million of debt in total and whose bankers are in talks with the Government over restructuring options, has told interest.co.nz in a response to an Official Information Act request that it will not name its bondholders. Nor will it disclose the interest rates it’s paying on them, or details of the bond’s covenants.

    The company has issued three medium term notes to wholesale investors worth a combined NZ$95 million, with the third and final issue taking place as recently as last November.

    “Solid Energy does not agree to release the names of the holders, the interest rates for each of the notes or the details of the covenants contained in the notes. This information is commercially sensitive,” Solid Energy says in a letter signed by its senior solicitor Rob Page.

    =====================

    So which of our illustrious institutions have a hand full of worthless paper?
    ACC, Govt. Super, Kiwisavers.

    A jolly good question. And one that apparently we are not going to be told about.

    http://www.interest.co.nz/bonds/63779/beleaguered-soe-solid-energy-wont-say-who-holds-nz95-million-worth-its-debt

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  59. Left Right and Centre (2,887 comments) says:

    liarbors a joke (424) 7:10 pm

    I like Willie if for no better reason than he makes me laugh. Some of his ‘this is what should happen/ how it should be’ views are headache inducing, sure.

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  60. nasska (10,917 comments) says:

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/7tra2uepdg38wh3/Muslim%202.jpg

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  61. nasska (10,917 comments) says:

    A bloke bumps into his mate in the pub the other night. The poor bugger was looking a bit glum so he asked him what was up.

    “Well, I can’t afford anything any more so I’ve had to cancel my golf and gym memberships, my Sky TV package and I’ve had to cut down on smokes to a couple of packs a week” the sad one sighed.

    “Because of the recession?”

    “No” he replied. “I’ve been forced off benefits and been made to get a bloody job.”

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  62. SPC (5,473 comments) says:

    Religion posted as useful as the common cold.

    “Daniel Dennett is a philosopher and cognitive scientist who applies Darwinian evolutionary theory not just to species, but to ideas, and specifically religious belief.

    He believes religion hampers rational thought and ultimately damages our species. Professor Dennett told Stephen Sackur religion is a drug human beings need to give up.

    He also described it as being like “the common cold” and said humans need to be cured of it.”

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-radio-and-tv-21947207

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  63. nasska (10,917 comments) says:

    Good link SPC….hard not to agree with the Professor except that I would have described religion as being as useful as a full blown dose of the clap. :)

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  64. bereal (3,137 comments) says:

    Let me guess, scribe is a maori, right ?

    Why else would a racist POS such as willie jackson be able to. “See where he is comming from.”
    when scribe says that Jessie Ryder asked for it when he copped a fractured skull and a
    punctured lung in a street assault.?

    willies mum must have been a great influence on him.

    Dead set racists, both of them.
    Like mother, like son.

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  65. SPC (5,473 comments) says:

    nasska, I fully expect that after the full interview is aired on the BBC this will be a new topic.

    After all Jews, Christians and Moslems will claim they are bigger faster and fitter than the rest of us and all because of their religion.

    I prefer deism, then you can have God and avoid the theist religions. It’s like having the best chocolate all to ones self.

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  66. nasska (10,917 comments) says:

    That of course is the way the whole thing started SPC. Some uneducated goat molester sitting out in the desert looks up in the sky & ponders over infinity & eternity. Along comes some itinerant soothsayer who tells him not to worry about it. All he has to do is worship a particular god & pay a few shekels & everything will be sorted.

    So far so good but then a few arseholes see a way of creating a power base from the desert believers & from then on it’s all downhill to the corrupt, blood thirsty religious hierarchies that plague us today.

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  67. SPC (5,473 comments) says:

    nasska, the founders of religions are like politicians who refuse to be voted out of power. Once they get established their legacy becomes a millstone/yoke for generations to carry.

    “Lord Monckton, who once argued for the quarantine of AIDS patients in internment camp-like facilities, is a vocal leader of the climate change-denying movement.

    In Copenhagen in 2009, the member of the right-wing anti-European UK Independence Party (UKIP) caused fury when he called young climate activists, ‘Hitler Youth’.”

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?

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  68. nasska (10,917 comments) says:

    Alas SPC, my opinions on AGW lie with the deniers but outbursts like those are not helpful.

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  69. SPC (5,473 comments) says:

    Science, like God, judges the creationists and those who try and deny AGW equally, without prejudice.

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  70. Andrei (2,532 comments) says:

    Fancy that in the NZSR we have kids reporting their parents to the authorities for nanny state violations.

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  71. nasska (10,917 comments) says:

    At eighteen she’s not exactly a kid Andrei but she would be the most horrible little nark I’ve heard of in a long time.

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  72. kowtow (7,968 comments) says:

    Narking “teen”……….my guess is revenge for something they didn’t give or allow her to do.

    Unless the family is massively disfunctional you just don;t do that.

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  73. SPC (5,473 comments) says:

    Global arms treaty being discussed at the UN, wonder how it will effect the supply of arms into Syria, Gaza and Lebanon?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-21998394

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  74. emmess (1,400 comments) says:

    Best article on the land supply problem I’ve seen
    http://www.newgeography.com/content/003609-why-british-prosperity-hobbled-a-rigged-land-market

    In Britain, but the laws of economics still apply.

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  75. itstricky (1,701 comments) says:

    Let me guess, scribe is a maori, right ?

    Nah. And it’s pretty easy to see that. And pretty easy to Google it if you were bothered to learn something rather than slander.

    Let me see. Ill expressed, yet fascinating, associations based on pure lazy speculation and bad attitudes towards people. Hmmmmm – Just like the ones you are flaming Jackson for…

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  76. itstricky (1,701 comments) says:

    Tough being a teacher.

    Oh yeah, I know what you mean. I mean, jees, it must be such an easy job. And it must pay so well. And they must only work until 3pm. What a cakewalk. Look, you’ve even got 11 colleagues who are going to sign up tomorrow with you. Tell us how you get on with your training will you? Not like we haven’t heard that 100 times before. Numb-skull comment of the day.

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  77. Longknives (4,686 comments) says:

    “Willie Jackson on radio live “i can see where scibe is coming from with his jessie ryder comments, i agree with him”. jesus.
    “youll probably find out the two that did the assualt are good buggas and youll be shocked”.

    Would Willie be saying this if Ryder was a young Maori?
    Fucking disgraceful.

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  78. Manolo (13,517 comments) says:

    A pothead leading this, maybe? http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10874950

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  79. Viking2 (11,284 comments) says:

    Anbother bunch of fairy heads using the RMA to stop progress.

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/8500382/Group-seeks-delay-on-230m-dam

    A group named Transparent Hawke’s Bay has engaged Wellington law firm Chen Palmer to seek a delay in the application to build the $230 million dam and irrigation scheme.

    It is proposed that a public-private scheme will build a dam west of Waipukurau that would hold 90 million cubic metres, capable of irrigating 30,000 hectares.

    Transparent Hawke’s Bay co-leader Pauline Elliott said the group felt there was insufficient information to enable appropriate consultation.

    Council chairman Fenton Wilson said the council and its investment arm would “emphatically deny” the group’s allegations.

    “In my view, the process of public consultation and collaborative stakeholder engagement over the past four or more years surrounding management of the Tukituki catchment has been robust,” Mr Wilson said.

    People had ample opportunity to have their say in various planning and strategy processes.
    ========================

    Here we go once more.

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  80. Manolo (13,517 comments) says:

    Good to see the old parasite “Lord” Palmer earning money from all sources: Law Society, United Nations, alcohol reform, government sinecures, Stone Age tribes, and now neo-Luddites.

    Mrs Chen is another case, altogether.

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  81. Mark (1,436 comments) says:

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/8500613/Spy-boss-got-job-after-call-from-PM

    This does not appear to be going away as quickly as the government might like

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  82. UglyTruth (4,551 comments) says:

    (Reuters) – Big depositors in Cyprus’s largest bank stand to lose far more than initially feared under a European Union rescue package to save the island from bankruptcy, a source with direct knowledge of the terms said on Friday.
    Under conditions expected to be announced on Saturday, depositors in Bank of Cyprus will get shares in the bank worth 37.5 percent of their deposits over 100,000 euros, the source told Reuters, while the rest of their deposits may never be paid back.

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