One in seven, not one in five?

July 9th, 2013 at 11:00 am by David Farrar

The Herald reports:

The Post Primary Teachers Association have released research which they believe shows that it is inaccurate and simplistic to say that one in five New Zealand students is failing in .

Independent researchers Liz Gordon, who was a former member of Parliament for Alliance, and Brian Easton who is an economist and columnist for the Listener, were given access to the Education Ministry’s 2009 OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) database.

They found 14.3 per cent of students failed to achieve proficiency level 2 on PISA reading.

Which would be one in seven, not one in five.

They also found 74 per cent of those who failed were male, and that socio-economic factors such as parental income and the number of books in the home were contributing issues.

Boys are doing far worse than girls at pretty much all levels of education. That’s a gender gap which should be a priority to close.

The spokeswoman for Ms Parata said ‘one in five’ was an estimate which reflected the fact that not every person is leaving school with the qualifications and skills they needed to succeed.

“It reflects the fact that 15 per cent of school leavers do not have an NCEA Level 1 qualification and the basic literacy and numeracy skills required to attain it, and that around 30 per cent of students leave school without an NCEA Level 2 qualification – the minimum level of competency required to train for a basic apprenticeship.

“The one out of five reference also drew on ERO research and reading recovery data which indicated that up to one in five young people are leaving school without the skills needed for modern jobs.

The report is here.

Tags: ,

40 Responses to “One in seven, not one in five?”

  1. kowtow (7,895 comments) says:

    Once upon a time we had exams to show the truth or otherwise of these claims.
    But progressive educational policies did away with exams…….now we’ve progressed to huge numbers of boys doing badly and many of whom will go to gaol as a result.

    Progress, dontcha love it?

    Vote: Thumb up 10 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  2. SPC (5,472 comments) says:

    So it is 1 in 5 boys failing to reach an adequate reading level, yet still more males become MP’s.

    Consequently more females complete a higher education, yet still more males become MP’s.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 7 You need to be logged in to vote
  3. Ed Snack (1,781 comments) says:

    Boys doing worse a reason to take action, David, that’s a feature, not a bug ! The only way to eventually overcome the wicked patriarchy is to destroy men through every avenue available.

    Also, if you educate the “lower classes” you risk allowing them access to resources that are not under the general control of the state and thus you risk that they will in time cease to become clients who will vote to maintain you in the state of power that is desired. Therefore it is important to make noises about privilege and poverty, to undermine and remove it from those of whom you disapprove, but not to remove it !

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  4. Redbaiter (7,962 comments) says:

    “15 per cent of school leavers do not have an NCEA Level 1 qualification and the basic literacy and numeracy skills required to attain it, and that around 30 per cent of students leave school without an NCEA Level 2 qualification”

    And once they get the vote, they all vote for Labour.

    Now you know why Labour always resists attempts to improve education.

    Vote: Thumb up 8 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  5. SPC (5,472 comments) says:

    And to define selection for representation by right of merit to exclude the underclass, so why are more males MP’s?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 4 You need to be logged in to vote
  6. OneTrack (2,777 comments) says:

    We must have at least 50% male teachers in order to address this inequality. Until individual schools have equal numbers of male and female teachers, they must be banned from hiring more female teachers. It’s only “fair”.

    Vote: Thumb up 10 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  7. labrator (1,840 comments) says:

    Boys are doing far worse than girls at pretty much all levels of education. That’s a gender gap which should be a priority to close

    No no no, didn’t you get the memo? The boardroom is the most important gender equality divide. Women are doing perfectly well in education thank you very much.

    Vote: Thumb up 8 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  8. ross69 (3,652 comments) says:

    So heck yeah has been exaggerating….and her figures endorsed by DPF.

    Oh well, at least we have the truth now and there’ll be no more bullshitting the figures.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 6 You need to be logged in to vote
  9. ross69 (3,652 comments) says:

    socio-economic factors such as parental income and the number of books in the home were contributing issues.

    Charter Schools will help turn that around. LMAO

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 10 You need to be logged in to vote
  10. Fletch (6,123 comments) says:

    Boys are doing far worse than girls at pretty much all levels of education. That’s a gender gap which should be a priority to close.

    Because of the ‘man-ban’ in schools.

    Vote: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  11. OneTrack (2,777 comments) says:

    SPC – “And to define selection for representation by right of merit to exclude the underclass, so why are more males MP’s?”

    Is this the lefts master plan to dumb down the male population so that only females are “smart” enough to become MPs?

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  12. SW (227 comments) says:

    Redbaiter – actually, you will find many of them do not vote. Hence the 74% turn out in the last general election – the lowest turnout since 1887.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  13. Rick Rowling (823 comments) says:

    They also found 74 per cent of those who failed were male

    But males have “male privilege” and need to be discriminated against.

    Anyone who says otherwise must be a white male, and therefore their opinion is to be disregarded, due to their “white male privilege”.

    Vote: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  14. OneTrack (2,777 comments) says:

    Ross69 – “socio-economic factors such as parental income and the number of books in the home were contributing issues.”

    Well the PPTA report said so, so it must be true.

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  15. shoreboy57 (134 comments) says:

    so 1 in 7 failing only, everything’s ok then with our teachers. Hoping Air New Zealand don’t adopt that approach with pilots

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  16. Redbaiter (7,962 comments) says:

    “Redbaiter – actually, you will find many of them do not vote. Hence the 74% turn out in the last general election – the lowest turnout since 1887.”

    SW, I consider the reason for that to be that many people just decided they were fed up to the back teeth with a choice between prog party one and prog party two.

    The under-educated are Labour’s raisson de etre in that socialist politicians must always have a sector of society that needs the left to provide help.

    Without any poor and suffering, Jacinda Ardern would have no mission in life, hence the more “under-privileged”, the more opportunity for Jacinda to feel good about herself.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  17. dime (9,634 comments) says:

    “So it is 1 in 5 boys failing to reach an adequate reading level, yet still more males become MP’s.

    Consequently more females complete a higher education, yet still more males become MP’s.”

    “And to define selection for representation by right of merit to exclude the underclass, so why are more males MP’s?”

    trolling? or just plain stupid.

    Ask yourself this – how long have girls been outperforming boys? how long has there been more women at uni then blokes?

    Now, what is the average age of an MP?

    If you cant figure it out from there… how many men have decided to have babies and stay at home?

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  18. doggone7 (751 comments) says:

    “…progressive educational policies did away with exams…….now we’ve progressed to huge numbers of boys doing badly and many of whom will go to gaol as a result…”

    Because there were no exams boys did badly at school so they went to gaol?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  19. dime (9,634 comments) says:

    Where is the dude from last weeks charter school debate

    15% are failing badly and they dont want to try anything cause “we are awesome”

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  20. doggone7 (751 comments) says:

    “Where is the dude from last weeks charter school debate? 15% are failing badly and they dont want to try anything cause “we are awesome.”

    He’s probably busy trying to find all the references from the uniformed about how 20% are leaving school illiterate!

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  21. SPC (5,472 comments) says:

    dime, I see you conclude that merit is not the issue holding back women from being in equal numbers as MP’s, just that many able women are not equal in age to male candidates.

    Otherwise you infer that female parenting is not as valid on a politicians resume as family man.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  22. Alan Wilkinson (1,841 comments) says:

    @SPC, stats show males cluster at the extremes more than females. So more can fail as well as more excelling.

    Also females do better in continuous assessment environments and males better in competitive ones. It’s unlikely school results predict political ones.

    Vote: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  23. dime (9,634 comments) says:

    “He’s probably busy trying to find all the references from the uniformed about how 20% are leaving school illiterate!”

    yeah its a real victory for the teachers. “only 15% are leaving school with no chance of making something of themselves. pay us more”.

    So in a highschool of 1500 kids, 225 are leaving without basic literary and numeracy skills. that is fucking mind blowing.

    450 are leaving without the grades to become an apprentice.

    Poor buggas never have a chance.

    Vote: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  24. dime (9,634 comments) says:

    SPC – I see how you think. Please do all you can to help Labour bring in a man ban. Do it for all of our sake.

    Back to the point – you will see more females in parliament in the next 20 years, despite the lack of a quota. same as more women ceo’s etc. its only been recently that they have pulled away from boys in education. it takes time for that to show up in senior business/ political positions.

    No one likes glass ceilings. Dimes ex-gf had a huge job, earned well over 2 hundy a year. she hit a glass ceiling and it was not cool. she has since changed job and moved up higher again. bless her. change takes time.

    quotas are never the answer.

    As Alan says though : Also females do better in continuous assessment environments and males better in competitive ones.

    I agree with that statement.

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  25. Samuel Smith (276 comments) says:

    Looks like a good piece of research.

    NZ top of the table when you look at the best 20% of students country-by-country, and still as high as 6th when you look at the bottom 20% of learners.

    I just don’t believe Parata when she beats down the NZ education system. The reality is it’s one of the best systems in the world for results and the very best of all multi-cultural OECD nations.

    The students of New Zealand should be congratulated for these excellent results.

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 4 You need to be logged in to vote
  26. RRM (9,630 comments) says:

    I would like to see more industry organisations (like Registered Master Builders) going into high schools and giving kids some alternative ideas about the real world.

    Hi, 5th form boys. Your degree-qualified teachers are probably encouraging you hard out that you should go to university (like them) come out with ~$50k student debt (like them) and if you’re lucky pick up an entry level position paying $38k that might turn into $45k after a couple of years (like them.)

    Fuck that. Get into a trade instead. You’ll be earning practically graduate money while you learn. Do the maths, figure out how far ahead you’ll be by the time your mates finish their degrees.

    Forget all this shit about how trades are for guys who aren’t smart, and anybody who’s anybody has to go to university.

    Vote: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  27. dime (9,634 comments) says:

    “I just don’t believe Parata when she beats down the NZ education system. The reality is it’s one of the best systems in the world for results and the very best of all multi-cultural OECD nations.”

    im sure youd be beaming with this much pride if your kid left school and could hardly read.

    “its ok, the system is awesome!”

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  28. SPC (5,472 comments) says:

    dime, politics (and parliament) is a continuous assessment environment. It is often poll driven.

    Calling equal representation quotas will only work for so long, explaining that merit choice is preferable is one thing – but inferring that men are somehow more often the superior candidate is to apologise for the glass ceiling. And to claim that the superior candidate can represent women is here the definition of paternalism – his fulfilling the role of the man to speak and act on behalf of the feminine …

    There is a reason the glass ceiling exists (priority to family life), the question is whether we should allow this to impact on relative representation levels.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 4 You need to be logged in to vote
  29. Rightandleft (652 comments) says:

    The point here is that the Minister has been repeatedly stating a statistic that has no actual basis in fact and then using that fake stat to blame teachers for failing schools. The 14% figure is not a figure that shows total illiteracy either, it shows a lower than acceptable level of literacy but not even 14% are leaving school totally unable to read and write. That 14% also includes immigrants with lower English language ability and the intellectually impaired students who have been improperly mainstreamed.

    The part about the socio-economic factors and lack of books in the home shows that schools are not the cure-all to these problems. There are problems at home that are having a greater effect on their learning. The study found that schools are actually doing an excellent job compared to public systems in nearly every developed nation in the study. We earn a PISA point for every US$92 spent per child, half the money input needed per PISA point for the US and UK. We are getting better value for money than any other PISA ranked system.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  30. doggone7 (751 comments) says:

    “… Poor buggas never have a chance.”

    Someone made an arbitrary call that a student leaving school without an NCEA Level 2 qualification (generally high school Year 12, the old form six) did not have the minimum level of competency required to train for a basic apprenticeship. Picking up on that some assume that all of those citizens are incapable and a waste of space. Thank goodness most of them get jobs and don’t sit around saying “I never had a chance.” I appreciate the help some of those gave me when I went to the supermarket this week and they were beavering away doing essential work.

    Like the “20% leaving school illiterate” catch cry, simplistic figures are grasped, used and spewed as simplistic, naive generalisations by malcontents and mischief makers.
    The level of intelligence and positive contribution of most of the so-called losers who leave school, is far more considerable than that of bellicose internet posters.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  31. itstricky (1,689 comments) says:

    I have not read it but clearly this is a good bit of research otherwise DPF would be trying to nit pick it to pieces. No cries of “off with her head” for misrepresenting and choosing stats to fit? Nah didn’t think so; gotta save your energy for the next round of union/teacher bashing right?

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  32. Paulus (2,554 comments) says:

    Listening today to RNZ it was commented by non other than Gavin Ellis, that the standard of written and spoken language is failing badly by the persons in the media, due to retirement principally,and does this matter.

    I have a theory, for young boys particularly, in education, and it is simple, but teachers are not up to a good enough standard either, and that is:-

    “If you cannot talk properly how the hell can you learn a language, or read one ?” – Maori included.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  33. dime (9,634 comments) says:

    ” I appreciate the help some of those gave me when I went to the supermarket this week and they were beavering away doing essential work.”

    were they putting your chardonnay through the register?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  34. Flyer (22 comments) says:

    So after just two years of National Standards we’ve already seen an improvement from 20% failing to just 14.3%!

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  35. doggone7 (751 comments) says:

    “So after just two years of National Standards we’ve already seen an improvement from 20% failing to just 14.3%!”

    An amazing tribute to Anne Tolley and Hekia Parata! But wait – there’s more! Apparently Ms Parata claimed that experts had found that four consecutive years of quality teaching eliminated any trace of socio-economic disadvantage. So when she’s sorted out teacher quality there will be no more socio-economic disadvantage. In some churches she would be anointed a saint.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  36. HB (295 comments) says:

    there are a few reasons why up to 15% are leaving school without NCEA L1
    1) they are just not up to it – e.g. have fetal alcohol syndrome, severe learning disabilities etc
    2) they leave school as soon as they turn 16 so don’t complete year 11 and therefore don’t achieve enough credits (quite a few fall in this category – most with parental endorsement)
    3) they may leave school without the qual but go on to achieve it elsewhere (alternative course providers).

    You also need to remember that at no point in history have the pass rates been as high as they are now… we can’t dumb down the work so that everyone passes otherwise what is the point? The qualification would mean nothing.

    All the above applies to L2 also. Except an even greater number are not up to it (with regards to traditional school subjects, anyway). There are alternative pathways for students to achieve but high schools can’t be everything for everyone. They already offer way more ‘alternatives’ than 20 years ago.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  37. doggone7 (751 comments) says:

    HB

    You are speaking reason (and probably from some direct experience.) Unfortunately the information is more that a simple catch cry so the teacher haters who think they know all about education will not be interested.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  38. HB (295 comments) says:

    yeah, direct experience.

    Not sure about the boy/girl thing.
    I do know that at the co-ed high school I teach at our boys get better results in NCEA than the all boys school. They are better at rugby though ;)

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  39. wf (396 comments) says:

    My grandson, who has been to decile 1 schools all his life is now, at 15, following a remedial reading program me. It’s not that he’s dumb, just not up to the level of reading activity needed for his studies. He is bi lingual Japanese/English. Thank goodness for an observant teacher is all I can say.

    Workplace literacy is very poor in some industries. Truck drivers, for instance, often can not read the lading bills for their trucks. Foresters cannot read the safety rules – is this why there are so many accidents in forestry?

    Ever since schools progressed to social advancement by age back in the 60′s rather than by achievement in the 3 Rs, especially reading, kids have been getting through primary school without any competency checks. Reading and comprehension went by the wayside when the ‘playway’ came in. It was easier.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  40. doggone7 (751 comments) says:

    “Ever since schools progressed to social advancement by age back in the 60′s rather than by achievement in the 3 Rs, especially reading, kids have been getting through primary school without any competency checks. Reading and comprehension went by the wayside when the ‘playway’ came in.”

    With due respect, these claims are rubbish. If you think I am wrong go to your three nearest primary schools and ask them if they have competency checks for their kids and how long they have had them. Ask them if Reading and comprehension have ever been discarded and if so when.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.