Another charter school

October 5th, 2013 at 10:00 am by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

The Vanguard Military School chief executive is defending against the threat of a teachers’ union boycott and promises from opposition parties to scrap them.

Nick Hyde is running the North Shore’s first partnership school and says he wants to “dispel the myths”.

He says the current education system is good for 80 per cent of students.

“Our place on the education map is to provide a place for those who are struggling.”

To be fair, I think it is around 85% who are doing well. The tail is around 15% not 20% according to latest research.

Vanguard Military School in Albany will be sponsored by Advance Training Centres (ATC), the military prep school Mr Hyde manages in Rosedale.

It is one of five partnership schools due to open at the start of 2014 in Auckland and Northland.

Labour and the Green Party have promised to repeal charter schools and the Post Primary Teachers Association (PPTA) is considering a boycott of any sporting, cultural or professional contact with them.

PPTA junior vice-president Hazel McIntosh says they are “a terrible experiment on New Zealand’s children that must be stopped in its tracks”.

A terrible experiment that is 100% voluntary. Not one family will have their kids attend a charter school unless they choose to do so. Unlike most state schools where uif you are in their zone, you have basically no alternative but to attend.

It is the choice that the PPTA opposes. They do not believe in it.

Vanguard Military School will cater for 108 year 11 and 12 students and expand in 2015 to include year 13.

Registered teachers will be used for core NCEA subjects like science, Maori, English and physical education. Non-registered teachers will take defence force studies and engineering classes.

“We felt someone with experience in these roles would be a better fit,” Mr Hyde says.

Students will also be taught computing, CV writing, leadership skills and will work towards their driver licences.

There will be a student-teacher ratio of 1 to 12.

Sounds terrible eh?

And they are not getting any extra state funding. They are getting the same as any new state school would get.

One of the reasons Mr Hyde decided to set up a charter school was over-demand for places at ATC.

“The horrible part of my job is to write to parents and say ‘Your child is eligible but we can’t take them on’,” he says.

ATC is entitled to have each student for only a year.

“It’ll be nice to have them for two or three years and we can take some of our most gifted students all the way through to university which is exciting,” Mr Hyde says.

He says charter schools have a place in the system as long as they are of a high quality.

The focus should be on quality. The five approved to date look promising.

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80 Responses to “Another charter school”

  1. Samuel Smith (276 comments) says:

    It seems there are only two options for Vanguard:

    1. Be closed down as soon as Labour and the Greens come to power.

    2. Assuming National keeps it promise (more fool me), the military academy will be closed down once it doesn’t produce NCEA results higher than the public system.

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  2. Tharg (15 comments) says:

    So what’s with opening this charter school on the North Shore, when it was always stated by the backers that they would be in ‘areas of significant educational underachievement’?
    And as for the unions ‘opposing choice’ – nice simple mantra, but it doesn’t stack up.
    1. The evidence shows that more choice between schools there is in an education system, the more unequal the outcomes ( per, Treasury, OECD… anyone else whose researched it). Isn’t lack of equity in outcomes the reason that this charter school experiment is run?
    2. Choice and competition between schools leads to winner and loser schools – and fewer choices for those in the loser schools as their subject offerings are narrowed and so forth.

    BTW – Vanguard’s success rate has been pretty average so far – with over 1 in 5 students not achieving the narrow range of standards that they offer.

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  3. tas (612 comments) says:

    Maybe the PPTA should run its own charter school. Then we can see how popular their policies are with parents.

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  4. Right of way is Way of Right (1,121 comments) says:

    Hang on Samuel, this military academy needs to produce NCEA results higher than the public system, but has to do it with students that have not managed to produce those results in the very same system? Sounds fishy!

    Surely the best option is the best outcome for the student! Something the PPTA seem to be overlooking in their ideological crusade against charter schools. In this regard, they are as contemptible as the Republicans who have managed to close down the US Govt!

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  5. Samuel Smith (276 comments) says:

    Yeah, I thought charter schools were supposed to be set-up in areas of underachievement like South Auckland.

    This one appears to be on the North Shore.

    Google it, I think John Banks’ son is a recent “graduate”.

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  6. Lance (2,629 comments) says:

    Also students in certain subjects gain the benefit of learning from someone who has actually practised their skill set in the real world, who knows what is real and what is crap, what employers would actually be after.
    As by way of personal experience I was going great in school maths until I hit calculus. Nobody could explain to me why we had to use these techniques, therefore I couldn’t visualise it and therefore I couldn’t understand it. I barely scraped through and avoided uni studies because I knew I couldn’t manage calculus. I qualified through the trades instead. Once I got my hands on electronics as a career and later into design, calculus was bloody obvious, why couldn’t someone have told that you could see calculus in action in electronic circuits. I could have qualified as an engineer much earlier than I did with the right tutor, someone who actually practised this.
    There has to be numerous other students who need the same sort of guidance and insight from practical and highly capable tutors who have been there- done that.

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  7. Samuel Smith (276 comments) says:

    @Lance – finding calculus difficult is nothing to be ashamed of. Just try harder next time.

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  8. Lance (2,629 comments) says:

    @Sam
    You appear to have not read what I wrote.
    Calculus is actually easy, for some, it needs to be explained in a practical way and probably by someone who actually uses it in the real world. Not some formulaic theorist.

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  9. gazzmaniac (2,307 comments) says:

    So what’s with opening this charter school on the North Shore, when it was always stated by the backers that they would be in ‘areas of significant educational underachievement’?

    There are underachieving middle class white kids just like there are underachieving brown kids. And not all middle class white people have enough money to do anything about it.

    Lance – I agree totally, and avoided electronics at uni for that reason. I studied geology instead and electronics is a hobby.

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  10. Than (451 comments) says:

    1. Be closed down as soon as Labour and the Greens come to power.

    It’s sad that this is a real possibility.

    A rational person would look at Charter Schools, assess their results, then decide whether to continue with them or not. But Labour has already declared they will be a failure and pre-planned excuses to explain away any evidence to the contrary. Utter blind ideology, directed by the self-interest of the teacher’s unions.

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  11. OneTrack (2,987 comments) says:

    “A rational person …”

    Well that excludes Labour and the Greens for a start.

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  12. Red Sam (122 comments) says:

    “1. Be closed down as soon as Labour and the Greens come to power.”

    Closed down or re-integrated into the public education system, such as a special character school (section 156 of the Education Act)?

    Alternatives to mainstream state schools have always been able to exist in New Zealand, particularly since the 1989 Education Act. But did the government need to introduce an entire new category of schools, ie charter schools, to bring about flexibility in a tiny country of 4.5 million? No, they did not. This form of privatised schooling was an ideological sop to their ACT party mates.

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  13. Anodos (116 comments) says:

    The problem being with the nonsense they people already have choices is that to set up a special character school is an administrative nightmare and virtually impossible. To set up a private school is easy but costs a fortune and only the wealthy can pay. So what all the lefties is advocating is keep all of the choice for those who can pay but keep the under-performing groups in their zones and without choice. Why advocate this – because it keeps union members in jobs and unchallenged as to the quality of work they do. Education is for kids and their families – and when and where it is failing they need choices.

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  14. transmogrifier (522 comments) says:

    Anyone opposing the idea of charter schools must be doing so on blinkered ideological grounds. I honestly cannot believe that those who profess to care about education would not welcome variety, choice, and targeted learning goals. We are “taught” at teachers’ college that all learners have different needs and what works for one may not work for another. Yet at the top end of educational policy, we have the exact opposite policy operating, where the NZ Curriculum is a one-size-fits all magical entity that will produce an army of brilliant students.

    What they have done, of course, to get this army of brilliant students to appear at the other end of the NCEA system is gut it of any genuine knowledge, critical thinking and communication skills, and instead make the learning objectives as hollow and fuzzy as possible so that any motivated teacher can find a way to cram many mediocre students into the basket marked ‘A’

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  15. wat dabney (3,709 comments) says:

    1. Be closed down as soon as Labour and the Greens come to power.

    This is what Obama – bought and paid for by rent-seeking teachers’ unions – did he first became President. Just threw the children under the bus, like Labour will do.

    That could be Labour’s election slogan: “Fuck the Kids”

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  16. Adolf Fiinkensein (2,872 comments) says:

    Clearly the idiots who comment here have not lived on the North Shore. I have and I can tell them there are plenty of areas where people are far from well off. You should ask Pam Apera (if she’s still there of the Beneficiaries Advocacy and Information Service in Glenfield how much money from WINZ each year she gains for low income people living between Torbayand Devonport.

    I recall a few years ago the figure exceeded $2mil. That’s what she negotiated for them on top of that which was already being paid. The problem was, apparently, many people did not know what they were entitled to receive according to their circumstances and, for one reason or another, WINZ did not tell them.

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  17. kowtow (8,211 comments) says:

    Lance @1048

    Which brings us back to the saying

    “Those who can, do,and those who can’t,teach.”

    Posted specially for the activists from the PPTA who appear to visit this blog whenever this subject comes up.
    And instead of trying to block innovation and protect your sinecures get back to teaching kids proper and the gummint mightn’t feel so pushed to do something about the huge failing tail here in Aotearoa formerly New Zealand.

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  18. wat dabney (3,709 comments) says:

    Nearly half of pupils from poorer backgrounds whose private school fees were paid by the last Tory government are now earning at least £90,000 a year.

    More than 75,000 children took part in the Assisted Places Scheme, which ran for 17 years from 1980 before it was abolished by Labour.

    A study revealed ‘virtually all’ have gone into well paid professional and managerial positions, including more than 40 per cent whose annual pay is £90,000 or more – nearly four times the national average salary of £24,000.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2443306/Half-assisted-place-pupils-earn-90k-Study-reveals-virtually-gone-professional-managerial-positions.html

    Can’t have young people escaping the reservation, can we. Labour relies on keeping people dependent on their patronage, and state teachers rely on maintaining their monopoly in order to keep their rent-seeking going.

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  19. Anodos (116 comments) says:

    And when they begin to get opportunities the PPTA try and make pariahs of them and ban “their staff and kids” from playing with them. One of the PPTA operatives was on TV news saying that he thought the best way was to treat them like they are a “disease”. Outstanding example to all.

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  20. Sir Cullen's Sidekick (872 comments) says:

    Unfortunately another school in the list of Cunliffe to close down when he assumes power in 2014…..

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  21. Chris R (70 comments) says:

    @Lance. I have been trying to teach myself calculus despite now being in my 50s. If only there’d been a charter school for me a few decades ago. Any tips on how to learn calculus for this grey-haired maths drop-out? Thanks.

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  22. Sir Cullen's Sidekick (872 comments) says:

    “That could be Labour’s election slogan: “Fuck the Kids” – All the latest opinion polls seem to support this….

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  23. Lance (2,629 comments) says:

    @Chris R
    It became clearer to me when I saw oscilloscope traces of electronic circuits in action and how I could manipulate the signal to what I wanted. I could then use the (mathematical) characteristics of the individual components (capacitor / inductor reactance etc) and work back from there.
    Another tip was understanding that a sine function is akin to a wheel turning, and a single point on that wheel will draw a sine if a roll of paper was pulled past it. So a steady circular motion is one of the fundamental building blocks of physics. If I keep that in mind when embroiled in equations using such functions then I can see them in my head and understand what I am doing.
    I worked this is concert with a book called “Calculus the Easy Way” by Douglas Downing ISBN 0-8120-9141-8

    By the time I had worked my way through the book and tried more circuit networks (oscillation damping and stepped response in particular), I could take the trainer wheels off and pick up the maths where I had left off years ago.

    The fact that I used electronics is immaterial, there are many other real world physics that can help visualise these equations.

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  24. HB (303 comments) says:

    “Unlike most state schools where uif (sic) you are in their zone, you have basically no alternative but to attend.”

    This is actually untrue.

    The majority of high school students have a choice of high schools to attend. Just because you live in ‘School A’ zone does not mean you are required to attend that school. What it does mean is that ‘School A’ must accept your enrolment if you live in their zone. You have it the wrong way round.

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  25. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    DPF is not a parent and that could be one reason he knows so little about our education system.

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  26. Ian McK (237 comments) says:

    What sort of left-wing scumbag is this arsehole Samuel Smith? He epitomises the good-for-nothing bludging shit that sit in judgment of anyone showing success. I hope the creep arrives at our place looking for work . . . I will treat him really well! I treat shit like him as they deserve.

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  27. Anodos (116 comments) says:

    HB – the issue is who can afford to catch a bus or be driven out of zone every day. And what “type” of kids get accepted out of zone. Have a good look at the demographics of the South Auckland High Schools that are 1% European and the zone population demographics then post a knowledgeable comment. How far out of zone ought they have to go? What are the acceptance policies of the schools they would like to get into?

    mikenmild – does everyone spokesperson for Education in parliament have children? Do you want to make that a criteria for expertise?

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  28. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    It is helpful to have a parent’s perspective, but I wouldn’t make it a qualification for public office. Personally, I’d prefer to impose an IQ test.

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  29. burt (8,206 comments) says:

    Have I missed something here – why do the Teachers Union think they control education policy ? Is there a reason why the Teachers union can’t establish a “Union school” to prove to everyone that having the best interests of teachers union representatives put before students and parents is the way to run a school ?

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  30. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    The unions certainly have an influence on education policy. It’s not surprising, seeing they represent most of the country’s education professionals.

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  31. Anodos (116 comments) says:

    They are worried that this is an attack on unions. The way that their executive have behaved with media (e.g. Hazel McIntosh on Larry Williams saying she hasn’t and wouldn’t read the Standford reports) has meant no one needs to “attack” them – they are putting holes in their own boat. Unfortunately they claim to speak for all teachers on all things – a huge credibility loss – and ostracising parents and children who make a different choice – brilliant example of promoting freedom and tolerance – something the NZ Curriculum clearly promotes.

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  32. Anodos (116 comments) says:

    mikenmild – There is representing and then there is representing well. They also need to remember the first priority of education is outcomes for kids and the needs of their families and every child getting the opportunity to do well especially when it hasn’t worked so far – i.e. with the kids Vanguard will work with.

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  33. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    People should also remember that these new schools are fortunately on such a tiny scale that they will make no difference to overall outcomes. I should think the best thing the government is hoping for is that ACT’s experiment runs for a few years and then everyone can forget about it all.

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  34. Anodos (116 comments) says:

    Schools are not supposed to be about overall outcomes but about every child mattering. That is why it is a disgrace to have an acceptable level of failure and call a system that does “world class”.

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  35. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Do you think it is possible to design a system where everyone achieves to his or her full potential?

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  36. Anodos (116 comments) says:

    Yes. NZ is a tiny and incredibly well resourced country. At the very least there is a massive difference between current outcomes and what is feasible. Both from the parent and formal education side – as well as the efforts of the students. The biggest issue is the schools and unions saying the outcomes are predetermined by economics and nothing will change until wealth patterns change. They have forgotten the purpose of state funded education (partnership Schools being one version of that). The worst thing to fight for at this point is the cycle enforcing status quo.

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  37. Reid (16,229 comments) says:

    Lefties want to close down any education they don’t control because its their prime social engineering platform which they use to churn out people who think “correctly” and the last thing they want is a grassroots movement that parents begin flocking to so they nip any such attempts in the bud before they have a chance to get any traction amongst the parents. Recall that Lange when PM made himself Education Minister? Why would any PM want that portfolio? This is why. Whenever a lefty govt is in power, always pay very careful attention to the Education portfolio.

    So you see their wretched policy on charter schools is even more insidious than their usual ideological fanaticism because they’re dealing not with their children but with OUR children. And most people don’t even know it.

    Disgusting creatures, aren’t they.

    And it says a lot for the ignorance of the Nats doesn’t it, that the idiots clearly don’t understand this basic lefty 101 mindset because if they did, they would have made Charter Schools their first priority in their first 100 days in their first term.

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  38. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Anodos
    I tend to agree – the best change that we could make would be to boost the remuneration and status of teaching as a professional choice for people – make it as attractive as medicine, for example. The partnership schools, on the other hand, are a pointless waste of time, as the sort of variation they are trying to showcase could be easily achieved within the current system with much less fuss all round.

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  39. Anodos (116 comments) says:

    mikenmild – The point is they can’t practically be achieved in the current system at all – although the letter of the law makes it seem possible. What proportion of New Zealanders can pay for the approx minimum of $12,000 per child for the choice of a private school. Why are there not the red-tape prohibitive Special Character Schools popping up to solve problems. Knowing people who have begun schools your word “easily” doesn’t mean what you think it means.

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  40. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    There have been plenty of special character schools established. I’m sure those involved have been passionate about this, and their reasons for doing so have generally been selfless. Most parents who are committed to their children’s education do the most obvious thing though; they get involved with the local school and work hard there.

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  41. Anodos (116 comments) says:

    I would genuinely like to know how many is “plenty” in terms of SC schools.

    There will be an easy test here for Partnership Schools
    Step 1: Will families go to the new schools.
    Step 2: Will they find something that suits and helps their child.

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  42. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    I don’t have numbers, but you could look it up easily enough. Sure, your test will give some information. What will you say about children that are failed by their partnerships schools?

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  43. doggone7 (769 comments) says:

    You know it’s going to be a controversial topic when early on you find, “…I think it is around 85% who are doing well. The tail is around 15% not 20% according to latest research.” That immediately goes against what has been commonly spouted on here in the past couple of years.

    I’m waiting for the information about the 15% that someone called the “huge failing tail.” Perhaps that expression could be explained. If there is to be no “acceptable level of failure” we have to have a 100% level of success. Someone please explain what success is. (If it is that 100% leave school and get jobs straight away don’t write that here send it directly to Steven Joyce, John Key or someone.)

    That is why it is a disgrace to have an acceptable level of failure and call a system that does “world class”.

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  44. Cato (1,095 comments) says:

    Actually, most teachers are overpaid as it is – at least at the primary level. It’s true that, at first glance, they are hemmed in by a lowish pay ceiling, but you have to take into account the very high basement. What you really have to look at is the fact that most people who move from the private sector into teaching normally receives a pay rise, and those who go from teaching to the private sector typically take a pay haircut.

    The teaching occupation (it’s not a profession because professionals don’t have trade unions and don’t strike) is probably the most widespread and visible example of state socialism. Everybody is paid the same according to their seniority and competition between members – there is no performance element to the job unless you are genuinely terrible at which case the principal and board might make some efforts to gradually ‘manage’ you out.

    There is a premium associated with that kind of security, albeit one with greater appeal to mediocrities. We have a glut of teachers at the moment and the problem is under the current paradigm there is no way to allocate the jobs to the good ones and away from the bad ones.

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  45. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    The current glut will probably turn to a shortage soon enough as there are many ageing teachers who will be retiring over the next five or ten years.
    If the current system is so mediocre, how come our results are so competitive internationally?

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  46. Anodos (116 comments) says:

    At Education Counts site
    – 2010 Level 1 Maori 65.7% pass. Non Maori 80.1%
    – 2010 Schools lever percentages with level 2 or above – Maori 53% – non-Maori 77%.

    Acceptable? Nope. World class? Only if the rest of the world is crap and we should be setting our own benchmarks anyway.

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  47. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Whay would be ‘acceptable’ rates. Do you think everyone should get to Level 1? Not many years ago it was assumed that an intermediate level education was satisfactory for most jobs.

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  48. Anodos (116 comments) says:

    Level one for all is a start for life as well as employment. The gaps between race groups are unacceptable in a nation resourced and stable like ours.

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  49. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Re the racial differences, you have to remember that the present government is allergic to targeting programmes by ethnicity. Level one for all is a noble ideal – but would require early identification of those most at risk of failure and intensive wrap-around services for those children, and their families.

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  50. Black with a Vengeance (1,810 comments) says:

    How about a ninja assassin school?

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  51. Psycho Milt (2,406 comments) says:

    Hang on Samuel, this military academy needs to produce NCEA results higher than the public system, but has to do it with students that have not managed to produce those results in the very same system?

    Given that the claimed purpose of these schools is to address the alleged failure of the public education system to teach these kids, the answer is “Yes.”

    A rational person would look at Charter Schools, assess their results, then decide whether to continue with them or not.

    Er, no. A rational person would have a wee think about what compelling evidence for diverting funding from public to private schools existed before actually doing it. They might even stir themselves to have a chat to experts before implementing it – but it seems rational persons are in short supply in the current government.

    HB – the issue is who can afford to catch a bus or be driven out of zone every day.

    This isn’t the USA – school zones overlap. My kids have been in multiple school zones for all levels of schooling (primary, intermediate and secondary). That’s typical for urban dwellers, not the exception.

    There will be an easy test here for Partnership Schools
    Step 1: Will families go to the new schools.
    Step 2: Will they find something that suits and helps their child.

    Those aren’t very useful tests. Step 1 tells nothing because, given the angst parents have about quality of education, any outfit claiming advantages over the regular system will get customers. Step 2 tells nothing unless the measurement can establish whether the effect is something the regular system couldn’t have provided, and whether the effect is free of a “placebo effect” resulting from the attention to their kid’s education involved in the parents moving them to a charter school.

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  52. Fisiani (1,025 comments) says:

    The partnership schools to give them their proper title are a worthy innovative trial. They are not compulsory. Every pupil will attend by choice. Choice is anathema to the teacher unions. I really wish that National would have the guts to challenge the teacher unions and make teaching a noble career once again. Hell. why stop at the teacher unions. Unions in general are a blight on modern civil society. They had a real and positive purpose at the start of the 20th century but are clearly a nihilistic and negative feature of the 21st century.

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  53. doggone7 (769 comments) says:

    mikenmild; You’ve got me thinking

    When I left school 50% got School C (NCEA level 1.) The “dumb” kids by and large had left the day they turned 15 so didn’t even get to School C!

    “The gaps between race groups are unacceptable,” someone noted. Obviously the fault of teachers.

    Someone said teaching isn’t a profession. I wouldn’t argue about that but consider the similarity to what doctors do. You get sick you go to a doctor or hospital to get fixed. Our society creates an underclass with all the attendant problems, the children from there go to school to get fixed. Schools don’t do it, the kids “fail” and teachers are blamed. Schools point out some of the realities and they’re accused on here of (being bound to) saying the outcomes are predetermined by economic circumstances.

    The best teachers are obviously at Kings College, St. Cuthberts College and schools like that. Not that I’m saying outcomes are predetermined by economic circumstances of course. What we need to do is get all those top scholars from Diocesan School for Girls, St Margarets, etc. to take up the non-profession of teaching. However I’m sure their parents would have been inspiring them to do something worthwhile with their lives.

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  54. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    doggone
    To follow that medical analogy a bit further, one may go to a doctor or hospital and very conceivably not ‘get fixed’. Do you blame the doctors and hospitals for that? As for people like Fisiani imagining that the unions are the cause of the problem, words fail me.

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  55. Griff (7,406 comments) says:

    The best teachers are obviously at Kings College, St. Cuthberts College and schools like that. Not that I’m saying outcomes are predetermined by economic circumstances of course.

    Of course some poor sap in Otara pulling his class up by a far greater degree than a rich school with more money, more resources and top quality teachers does not count in this world view.
    1/ students in 1/ student out is less “Best” teaching than 10/ student in 4 / student out.

    Many “best” teachers work in feral suburbs because they give a fuck and chose to teach in less benighted areas.

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  56. doggone7 (769 comments) says:

    mikenmild

    I have never been a member of the much-loathed (by a few) PPTA but have known a few people who were in it. (I suppose my kids’ teachers would have been in unions – never thought about that actually till right this minute.) My observation would be that being in the union played a very, very small part of their work lives and way less of their whole being. They were too busy doing their work. Anyone would think that teachers’ unions are outfits operating like the Mongrel Mob and have an agenda of anarchy and spend all their time plotting how to destroy education reading some stuff I see.
    p.s. And I thank all those who put their hearts and souls into doing their best for my kids and their friends.

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  57. Antarg (38 comments) says:

    If there’s no government funding and the law is being adhered to, there’s no reason for private schools to be removed…

    Unfortunately, there’s considerable evidence available that the law is being disregarded wholesale by this government.
    The UN has been notified by independent bodies about the disregard for human rights, and in this context, charter schools are obviously going to raise suspicion.

    In an international context, there’s more to go on. Consider the impact of ‘training institutions’ like Common Purpose in the UK, where leadership training has been used to put people in power who really shouldn’t be, and it gets alarming.
    In some cases training from charter schools has been reported in terms that suggest little more than brainwashing or behavioural modification.

    Schools that are voluntarily financed are a great idea in principle, in fact I think the idea of all schools being crowdfunded by the local community should be a fundamental part of democracy.

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  58. Johnboy (15,903 comments) says:

    Ah The Vanguard! :)

    They should have picked a more successful name really! :)

    Launches

    Vanguard launched 3 satellites out of 11 launch attempts:

    Vanguard TV3 – December 6, 1957 – Failed to orbit 1.36 kg (3 lb) satellite
    Vanguard TV3 Backup – February 5, 1958 – Failed to orbit 1.36 kg (3 lb) satellite
    Vanguard 1 – March 17, 1958 – Orbited 1.47 kg (3.25 lb) satellite
    Vanguard TV5 – April 28, 1958 – Failed to orbit 10.0 kg (22 lb) satellite
    Vanguard SLV 1 – May 27, 1958 – Failed to orbit 10.0 kg (22 lb) satellite
    Vanguard SLV 2 – June 26, 1958 – Failed to orbit 10.0 kg (22 lb) satellite
    Vanguard SLV 3 – September 26, 1958 – Failed to orbit 10.0 kg (22 lb) satellite
    Vanguard 2 – February 17, 1959 – Orbited 9.8 kg (21.6 lb) satellite
    Vanguard SLV 5 – April 13, 1959 – Failed to orbit 10.3 kg (22.7 lb) satellite
    Vanguard SLV 6 – June 22, 1959 – Failed to orbit 10.3 kg (22.7 lb) satellite
    Vanguard 3 – September 18, 1959 – Orbited 22.7 kg (50 lb) satellite[6]

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  59. Griff (7,406 comments) says:

    There union is along the watersiders and boilermakes using its self imposed monopoly on those who qualify as teachers et al.
    still a state sanction dinosaur like the railways the seafreight service and other archaic monopolys inflicted by muldoonisim and more misguided fools prior. NZ only awoken to reality in Roger’s economics.

    I do not see the harm in experimenting and allowing successful methods of education to flourish at a cost to less successful educational philosophy.

    I also support a system where if you opt out of the state system you get a credited to cost of privately funding your kids education.

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  60. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Would you like to opt out of socialised medicine as well?

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  61. Johnboy (15,903 comments) says:

    If they socialised Viagra I would stay in, otherwise I’d opt out. :)

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  62. wat dabney (3,709 comments) says:

    Would you like to opt out of socialised medicine as well?

    Many people would, given the chance.

    The Cabinet Secretary has been asked to investigate whether Labour put “undue political pressure” on civil servants to “cover up” appalling standards of care at failing hospitals…Internal emails show that in November 2009 Labour tried to stop the NHS watchdog from informing the public about failings at Basildon University Hospital, where patients were dying needlessly on filthy wards.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/10356621/Cabinet-Secretary-asked-to-investigate-Labour-cover-up-over-failing-hospitals.html

    Why should people be forced to pay for a criminally negligent “service” run for the benefit of employees rather than consumers?

    We might choose to remain in the pool if the actual delivery of services was by competing private institutions. There is absolutely no reason for the state to actually deliver education or healthcare as a government monopoly.

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  63. Griff (7,406 comments) says:

    Some do mike.
    Its a way to stop the social science based loony’s in academia with their un supported programs of change, their social engineering and wish washy values system.
    Results based on achieving the goals of the parents, not the teachers union and social science nutwhacks

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  64. Psycho Milt (2,406 comments) says:

    The partnership schools to give them their proper title are a worthy innovative trial. They are not compulsory. Every pupil will attend by choice. Choice is anathema to the teacher unions. I really wish that National would have the guts to challenge the teacher unions…

    One envisages a future Labour government setting up public sector supermarkets to compete with the existing duopoly. Fisiani will endorse it as a “worthy innovative trial” because it won’t be compulsory to shop there and every customer will shop there by choice. Choice is anathema to the supermarket duopoly. Everyone wishes Labour would have the guts to challenge the big grocery businesses…

    In short, there’s a bit more to what makes something “worthy” and “innovative” than whether it’s compulsory and whether it will annoy people you don’t like.

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  65. doggone7 (769 comments) says:

    “There union is along the watersiders and boilermakes using its self imposed monopoly on those who qualify as teachers et al.”

    I do not understand this.

    “… stop the social science based loony’s in academia with their un supported programs of change, their social engineering and wish washy values system.” The politicians?

    “Results based on achieving the goals of the parents, not the teachers union and social science nutwhacks.”

    10% of the population have mental health problems. That means in a school with 100 staff 10 might be questionable. The 1500 kids would have nearly 3000 parents/caregivers. That makes 300 with mental health issues. Let’s not call them “nut-whacks” but let’s have them running the school eh?

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  66. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    The whole point of the 1989 education reforms was to get parents running the schools.

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  67. Griff (7,406 comments) says:

    Unions such as the boilermakers and the ship stewards watersiders many of those involved in the think big project use there state sponsored union control of the work place to further ideological aims at the expense of the service their members where contracted to provide and the country as a whole.

    One example
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1951_New_Zealand_waterfront_dispute
    The attitude of the watersiders puzzled many rural New Zealanders. The 40-hour-week legislation had been introduced supposedly to “protect” factory workers who had chosen to work long hours all year round. But New Zealand also had an agricultural economy, requiring all farm-workers – shepherds, shearers, hay-makers, truck-drivers, freezing-workers, fruit pickers – to work longer hours in summer, with much more free time in winter. In addition, watersiders and freezing workers were already earning incomes approximately 30% higher than most workers, receiving about 10 shillings an hour. In comparison, schoolteachers and truck drivers were getting about 7/-, female chefs 5/- and nuns teaching in Catholic schools 1/6 an hour.

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  68. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    And the relevance of the 1951 waterfront lockout to schooling in 2013 would be what, exactly?

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  69. Griff (7,406 comments) says:

    watersiders and freezing workers were already earning incomes approximately 30% higher than most workers, receiving about 10 shillings an hour. In comparison, schoolteachers and truck drivers were getting about 7/-, female chefs 5/- and nuns teaching in Catholic schools 1/6 an hour.</

    It represented extortion as only union labor could do the job at real hour worked rates well above market price .
    Don't get me started on the crony capitalism rife in the licensing of imports to a select few Rortregime :wink:
    Too far back in history for you?
    Both the costs involved in .

    The inefficient union labor force deliberately engage in a battle against the capitalist scum.

    Crony capitalist working on a cost plus pricing system that still allowed protected industry to compete and in same cases make excellent profits.

    We paid for .

    I worked in a freezing works. built car tires. maintain equipment etc etc . I was well aware of the union throwing it weight around under often suspect leadership. I have also been an instigator in chucking one union for another in a large work forces due to corrupt and inefficient union officers. I have also been involved in most possible angles in the union employee dynamic from employe to employer.

    The unions have a place.

    Some of the ideological goals some unions aspire to are not at the country’s, the governments the populous or the workers benefit.

    monopoly should be discouraged this includes any where with a single body controlling worker employer interface in large industry including education.

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  70. Antarg (38 comments) says:

    Most of this system was built on fraud.
    Do a search for ‘meet your strawman’.

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  71. valeriusterminus (243 comments) says:

    There are many considerations proscribed by State that negate a parents liberal choice of what they “do” with their kids.
    Food – shelter – healthcare, are all proscribed. Education – well that just should not be left to the whim of the parent at the time.

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  72. valeriusterminus (243 comments) says:

    Like – Charter Schools are the the educational equivalent of a Mexican cancer clinic.

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  73. Griff (7,406 comments) says:

    There are parts of Mexican cancer clinic in the present education regime.
    Also a certain amount of anti government sedation.
    This I know from close family engaged on the coal face. As well as in the media and in published reports from within education .

    http://tvnz.co.nz/national-news/report-slams-reading-recovery-programme-5542927

    Is one of many distortions of ideology.

    Evidence based allocation of resources.

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  74. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Griff
    I’m all for following the evidence. Your recollections of the 1951 waterfront dispute and your time in the freezing works does not really have much relvance to the present-day role of the education unions. The unions are influential, but do not control the education system – they are merely voluntary associations of employees.
    Which parts of the system would you describes as ‘Mexican cancer clinics’?

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  75. Duxton (636 comments) says:

    Black @ 6.11pm

    Hey bro! Choice to sees youz fullez back, cuz! Dees righties can’t argue wiz youz, bro! Youz da big inter…..inta….intrlic….smart guy, cuz!!! Choice, bro! Keep posting yourz stuff man. Every time youz do it, youz proves you is rite, cuz!

    Safe bro.

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  76. Griff (7,406 comments) says:

    The unions are influential, but do not control the education system – they are merely voluntary associations of employees.

    PPTA junior vice-president Hazel McIntosh says they are “a terrible experiment on New Zealand’s children that must be stopped in its tracks”.

    Might not have control in this case they are not acting in the best interest of kids just how they think they can protect there membership.
    http://ppta.org.nz/index.php/communities/president-page/2373-pres-charterschools-view

    No union has control the waterside’s did not have control they still managed to generate a vote that stopped the country and cased some measure of resulting social unrest.

    They have stated it is a fail experiment when in some cases there has been proven benefit on charter schools
    they also make unreasonable demands on funding and management

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  77. Griff (7,406 comments) says:

    Political statements and similar sourced from PPTA blog

    don’t think I’m the only one who shuddered when Parata posted her holiday snaps recently on twitter and one showed her grinning next to the gormless Michael Gove.

    So the first (and likely last) wave of charter schools have crawled out from the murky shadows. What have we learnt from a first glance at this unwelcome, invasive species?

    D Grade education minister Hekia Parata landed another blow to earthquake devastated Aranui schools this afternoon by issuing a slow death warrant

    They’ve picked up on the worry about unregistered teachers, and are fudging around the percentage to allay this. The ones offering secondary education all say they will have registered teachers for the ‘core curriculum’ but no commitment to have registered teachers for what they call ‘supplementary subjects’. This distinction is weasel words

    New Zealand Minister of Education Hekia Parata continues to assert that to be a teacher does not require teaching registration – that is, she believes that professional teaching does not require a teaching qualification.

    All teachers want is to work with their colleagues across schools in well-facilitated, professional learning communities, assisted by co-ordination and effective guidance from the centre. This is precisely what is lacking.

    Instead this government has opted for national standards used to rank students and send schools into spirals of failure for the poor and increased educational advantage for the rich.

    And so on

    attacking the government and its policy on ideological grounds and placing it self at direct opposition to what the boss (minister) requires from them.

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  78. ChardonnayGuy (1,197 comments) says:

    I’m not so much worried about Vanguard as I am about some of the fundamentalist Christian outfits that were recipients of charter school largesse. Fundies are not particularly good at strategic management and long-term objective planning, and tend toward populism, quick fixes, and short-term expediency. I suspect that in some cases, these managerial defects will appear in due course, lead to dysfunctional outcomes, and the whole business may end up boomeranging in the general direction of National and ACT.

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  79. wat dabney (3,709 comments) says:

    The unions are influential, but do not control the education system – they are merely voluntary associations of employees.

    Bollocks.

    They are a powerful and well-organised special-interest group which has conspired through its Labour Party vehicle to legally enforce the current monopoly, to the benefit of group members and at the expense of children and taxpayers.

    Politically-active cartels such as these, specifically organised for rent-seeking purposes, are not ‘merely voluntary associations’. They are thugs in suits.

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  80. Dave Mann (1,207 comments) says:

    So, some self styled military outfit has set up a training camp for Maori activists to brainwash disaffected youth and teach them to kill more effectively…. and we are supposed to APPLAUD this..?

    Are people mad?

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