Drug use spreads at the Herald

January 29th, 2014 at 10:00 am by David Farrar

The Herald continues with the fantasy that there in a parallel universe in which National might agree to make Winston Peters Prime Minister.

Audrey Young writes:

John Key this morning scoffed at speculation that National might consider any power-sharing arrangement with New Zealand First leader Winston Peters as though it were complete fantasy.

Scoffed? This is the equivalent of asking if there are little green men on the moon. It is complete fantasy.

But the notion is not that off-the-planet that is hasn’t been contemplated. Here’s some of the context.

Back in 1996, at the final stages of coalition negotiations, NZ First asked Labour for a power sharing arrangement in which Peters would be Prime Minister for some of the term and Helen Clark the other.

I’m sure Winston did ask for it in 1996, or someone on his behalf did. He may have asked for the Crown Jewels also. The issue isn’t that of course Winston wants to be PM. The issue is whether a party that gets 5% of the vote would ever get their leader made PM.

It was instantly rejected by Labour.

Of course it was. So what makes anyone think that if a party on 28% of the vote instantly rejected making the leader of a party that got 13% of the vote Prime Minister, that a party looking to get 45% of the vote would make the leader of a party that gets say 5% of the vote prime minister?

Herald correspondent John Armstrong raised the power-sharing issue at the weekend in his political column following Key’s decision last week to lift his ban on working with NZ First post-election.

In light of John’s column, I asked the Prime Minister this morning if he would rule out a power-sharing deal and he said “that’s not on the table.”

Pressed further, he said ”No, Winston Peters won’t become Prime Minister.”

ZB’s Barry Soper asked him if it were put on the table, would he consider it, and Key said No.

I look forward to the Herald asking the leaders of National and Labour if they would agree to declare war on Australia, if NZ First ask for it. Also ask them if they would agree to sacrifice their eldest child to Lord Xenu, and become Scientologists if NZ First asked for it. All there scenarios are equally likely – ie zero.

Now I’m quite happy to stand by my certainty. The odds of Elvis being alive are 1000 to 1. I’m happy to offer the same odds against National ever making Winston Peters Prime Minister – 1000 to 1. The only criteria are you must pledge at least $500 (so I would pay out $500,000) and you must pay the $500 immediately to me, and I will pay the $500,000 on the day Peters is sworn in as Prime Minister, backed by National.

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17 Responses to “Drug use spreads at the Herald”

  1. Pete George (23,687 comments) says:

    Why would National want to work with this Winston:

    The plan outlined by the Prime Minister for 2014 brought to mind the word “hoover”. Not the great water dam in the United States, not the first FBI boss in the United States, but the vacuum cleaner. You know why? Because it sucks. John Key has spent too long running around after the movie moguls. He is in his own fantasy land. His speech had the most confused start of any speech that I have ever heard in this House by a party leader—the most confused start that I have ever heard.

    New Zealand’s Prime Minister’s of the past would have been embarrassed to have spouted such dribble. I think that a leadership spill in the National Party is not long away.

    National is a Government of non-achievers with a woeful record of failure. It always puts the interests of foreign big-business ahead of ordinary New Zealanders.

    Mr Key made a speech last week, if you recall, and all of sudden, he says “Oh, we will be happy to talk to New Zealand First.” It is a bit like that famous quote from Jesse Jackson: “Now, Santa Claus running into heavy weather, and he calls for Rudolph.” It is unbelievable— unbelievable. There is no basis for this National Government to boast about its economic record.

    The stark, ugly truth is that New Zealand is nowhere near paying its way in the world, Mr Bennett. It is clear that this Government is clueless as to how to address that. Young New Zealanders have been betrayed by this Government.

    Two minutes to go, Mr Speaker? One minute to go? Wonderful. That will be enough to finish off this party. What we have heard today, if you look at the penultimate page, is a statement about taking steps this year to introduce a National match-fixing policy. That is what we heard today. It was National’s match-fixing policy for the election.

    If you cannot win the game, cheat—fix it. Well, we are on red alert and ready to hand out a card. We cannot say it will be a red card. We cannot say it will be a green card. We cannot say it will be a yellow card. But we most definitely can say that it will be a white card. As soon as they fly, it will be a white and black card, as soon as they—as they will—fly the white flag.

    One last statement: remember what Mr Key said about the SIS raid last year? He said he did not know about it. We will prove in this House that he did.

    (from draft Hansard DEBATE ON PRIME MINISTER’S STATEMENT 15:19:04~Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS (Leader—NZ First)

    It would take more than drugs to consider working with someone talking about your party like that.

    “We will prove in this House that he did.”

    Like all the other lies about having proof?

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  2. redqueen (583 comments) says:

    Is John Key allowed to take that bet? ;)

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  3. ExtremeRightisright (23 comments) says:

    Can i be a venture Capitalist!!!

    I love the prospect of being able to earn huge sums of money by doing no REAL work!

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  4. Ashley Schaeffer (513 comments) says:

    Winston is barely coherent if that speech in the House is anything to go by. It’s actually a little sad just how much the guy’s faculties have deteriorated. National should have ruled him out as a coalition option again – not doing so was a wrong step by Key.

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  5. Scott (1,821 comments) says:

    DPF – you mean Elvis is dead? That’s not true! He is alive and well and living with a waitress in Idaho. I know this is true because I read it in News of the world.

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  6. peterwn (3,312 comments) says:

    There is an even older precedent. When Norm Kirk (or might have been Bill Rowling) went overseas, Hugh Watt was acting Prime Minister. Hugh asked to be driven around in CR 1 (CR 1 is the only limo that is specifically allocated, the others are ‘pooled’), but was refused by the Public Service Garage (as it then was). So Hugh asked if the CR 1 plates could be transferred to another limo while he was acting PM. So someone else had Prime Ministerial pretentions.

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  7. David Farrar (1,902 comments) says:

    Heh poor Hugh. I’ve even been driven in CR1 (without the PM). Highlight was having it go through drive in McDonalds :-)

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  8. Enzo (45 comments) says:

    I don’t believe you are good for the money if more than a couple of people take the bet.

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  9. dime (10,134 comments) says:

    lol are the herald trying to make it look like national are a shambles? to deflect from the dipshit left?

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  10. stephen2d (87 comments) says:

    dime: yep, The NZ Herald: when you can’t gather the news in a “trained and skilled” way, then make shit up.

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  11. tvb (4,518 comments) says:

    The National Party would openly revolt against a power sharing arrangement that has Winston Peters PM. Just where is the Herald getting this stuff.

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  12. tas (649 comments) says:

    I think Key is giving Winston the embrace of death. Key didn’t open the door to Winston in order to actually work with him, he did it to scare left-wing voters away from Winston.

    Winston’s supporters are overwhelmingly left-wing: in 2011, 42.7% of NZ First voters voted for Labour electorate candidates, versus 16.6% for National (source).

    If there is a real possibility of Winston supporting a National government, it will probably decrease Winston’s support below 5%.

    I believe Key emphatically ruled out reducing superannuation in 2008 (he promised to resign) to drain Winston’s support amongst seniors. It worked – Winston got 4.1%. Let’s hope it works in 2014 too.

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  13. Laksa (16 comments) says:

    I can see it now, John and Winston having a quiet meeting deep inside Parliament.

    “Little proposal for you Winston.” he says “you give me $500 so I can make a small wager and when get into power, I’ll make you PM for a whole week how does that sound? What’s more for that week in power I’ll personally pay you $100,000.”

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  14. OneTrack (3,237 comments) says:

    “Can i be a venture Capitalist!!!”

    Yes, you can. Invest your own money wherever and whenever you like. You just need to be prepared for the likely possibility that you will lose the lot with no comeback.

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  15. OneTrack (3,237 comments) says:

    “Just where is the Herald getting this stuff.”

    Green Party press releases, as usual.

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  16. SPC (5,787 comments) says:

    Do you have the $500,000?

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  17. Rex Widerstrom (5,354 comments) says:

    Back in 1996, at the final stages of coalition negotiations, NZ First asked Labour for a power sharing arrangement in which Peters would be Prime Minister for some of the term and Helen Clark the other.

    I was advising the Labour negotiating team at that time (Michael Hirschfeld, Mike Moore et al). The consensus, when that was dropped on the table – seemingly without much forethought – was that, since Labour had acquiesced to most of NZF’s reasonable requests, it was time to make unreasonable ones so as to be able to “truthfully” say that they couldn’t reach agreement with Labour.

    I believe Winston thought then that if he could govern with National, especially with Bolger as its leader, that National’s MPs would see that he (Winston) ought to have been their choice all along. He didn’t just want to be PM, he wanted to be a National PM – not sure whether that holds true now, though I very much doubt it as reality has surely sunk in.

    And after all, it wasn’t much of an ask to look more Prime Ministerial than Bolger. Presumably NZF would have folded into National, with Winston at its head.

    He made it to Deputy PM, but a year later National put paid to the plan (idle daydream might be a better description, really) by rolling Bolger and appointing Shipley. There followed the major dummy spit and dissolution of the Coalition. Winston may still have harboured hopes that some Nat MPs would have preferred offering him the Prime Ministership rather than face a mid-term election, but that daydream was torpedoed by the hubris of some of his MPs, who thought it was they NZF voters had supported and remained within the government (the perks and baubles no doubt played a role, as most who did were Ministers), so Shipley was able to continue to govern.

    However he must realise now that many of the current crop of National MPs don’t recall his halcyon days as a Young Turk, hold Key in higher regard than did their counterparts in ’96 when it came to Bolger, and aren’t in much danger of losing power, so I suspect even Winston himself wonders what some journalists have been smoking.

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