The new ACT Leader

February 3rd, 2014 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

Audrey Young reports:

Dr Whyte, 48, has lived for about six of the past 20 years in New Zealand and Mr Seymour, 30, has lived for two of the past seven years in New Zealand.

Both have philosophy degrees and Dr Whyte has been a noted writer and columnist in Britain.

Dr Whyte lives in Herne Bay with his wife, Zainab, originally from west Africa and raised in Belgium, and their two daughters, Rachel, 10, and Khadija, 6.

(The girls attend the same school as the children of Labour Party leader David Cunliffe.)

Dr Whyte’s first few hours as new leader were marred by Mr Boscawen’s decision to withdraw not only his fundraising services to the party but by his threat to withdraw his own substantial donations, which have been at least $250,000.

Mr Boscawen said he accepted the result, and would remain a member of the party, and sincerely wished Dr Whyte and Mr Seymour every success.

Dr Whyte said he would spend the next month gearing up for his first party conference as leader, policy work, fundraising “and revving up the members”.

He said his previous writing promoting the legalisation of drugs, for example, had been of greater concern to Mr Boscawen than to the board.

Such a policy would be attractive to many voters, but not I suspect in Epsom!

Mr Cunliffe said it was ironic that a party that had been “dismissive of academics in Parliament had chosen two academics as their leader and candidate”. Referring to Dr Whyte’s advocacy of legalisation of drugs and getting rid of all labour laws, Mr Cunliffe said “that would put him in the realm of Colin Craig and show that Mr Key really is desperate for coalition partners”.

I’m pretty sure that Colin Craig is not an advocate for legalisation of drugs!

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77 Responses to “The new ACT Leader”

  1. dog_eat_dog (679 comments) says:

    Someone had better tell David the Green’s policy on marijuana, lest he be seen as ‘desperate’.

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  2. EAD (316 comments) says:

    I’ve had the privilege of hearing Jamie Whyte speak over here in the UK on several occasions. He is a Senior Fellow at the Cobden Centre which is in IMHO the best Austrian School of Economics Institute outside of the Mises Institute in the USA. He is a very intelligent man and it is somebody who I would vote for on principle rather than to keep the most extreme form of the Statists away from the levers of power.

    If he can play the media game well, he will increase the level of political debate in NZ immensely as I’d imagine a large % of NZ’s population have never been exposed to a proper Libertarian philosophy from the NZ MSM. Hopefully it will wake people up to the false left/right, red/blue paradigm that the media portrays as the only options and thus that gives legitimacy to big government whereby 40% of “GDP” is now seen as being “right-wing” by some.

    If you want to read some of his writings, see the links below:

    http://www.cityam.com/profile/jamie-whyte
    http://www.cobdencentre.org/author/jamie/

    My regards to John Boscawen – a deeply principled and intelligent man.

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  3. deadrightkev (178 comments) says:

    It matters little how long they have lived in NZ and if they have a libertarian view on drugs. Just look at Russel Norman, an Aussie activist who leads a NZ political party at 12% plus in the polls.

    John Key will give Whyte the nod and Epsom voters will oblige.

    What will determine Act success for the future is the people Whyte pulls in to rebuild the party, the quality of candidates he can attract and the approach he takes to inspire and attract former members.

    Whyte and Seymour on their own with a few well meaning board members will not be enough.

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  4. David Garrett (5,134 comments) says:

    I don’t know quite what to make of the decision to elect Whyte as leader, but have Seymour stand in Epsom…I know Rodney thinks it’s nuts, and I have huge respect for his judgment. Time will tell.

    I will be expecting Whyte to continue to support ACT’s Law and Order policies as he has told me he does…It always puzzles me that some people seem to think economic “classical” Liberalism and hard line law and order policies are contradictory…They are not at all contradictory..

    One of the basic tenets of “Liberalism” – with a capital “L” – is that no person is entitled to molest or interfere with any other person going about their lawful business…Locking up bad bastards for a long time is entirely consistent with that philosophy.

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  5. NK (916 comments) says:

    One of the basic tenets of “Liberalism” – with a capital “L” – is that no person is entitled to molest or interfere with any other person going about their lawful business…Locking up bad bastards for a long time is entirely consistent with that philosophy.

    Yep. We’re all blood brothers there David.

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  6. dime (8,752 comments) says:

    “One of the basic tenets of “Liberalism” – with a capital “L” – is that no person is entitled to molest or interfere with any other person going about their lawful business…Locking up bad bastards for a long time is entirely consistent with that philosophy.”

    fuckin a!

    “as I’d imagine a large % of NZ’s population have never been exposed to a proper Libertarian philosophy from the NZ MSM”

    true that!

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  7. dime (8,752 comments) says:

    libertarianism has a decent shot at getting some traction world wide.

    just like new left wing trends seem to hit everywhere at the same time eg the living wage.

    like the extreme left, we only need 5-10% to have a decent impact.

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  8. tas (527 comments) says:

    Oh God please don’t bring Cannabis up again. I agree that it should be legalised, but, unless there is political appetite for discussion of the issue, it’s an issue that is best ignored by ACT.

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  9. Pete George (21,812 comments) says:

    One of the basic tenets of “Liberalism” – with a capital “L” – is that no person is entitled to molest or interfere with any other person going about their lawful business…Locking up bad bastards for a long time is entirely consistent with that philosophy.

    Libertarianism is in the eye of the beholder.

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  10. kowtow (6,706 comments) says:

    Yep,bad bastards should be locked up,including fuckers who sell drugs.

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  11. dime (8,752 comments) says:

    “Yep,bad bastards should be locked up,including fuckers who sell drugs.”

    what about bad bastards that sell… sugar? :O :O

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  12. EAD (316 comments) says:

    That is true indeed Dime. I think every Libertarian/Austrian School follower has an ah ha moment when all of a sudden everything just makes sense. Mine was hearing Ron Paul talking about issues which no other Presidential Candidates Red or Blue ever discussed like Central Banking. All the others seemed to talk in soundbites and focus on divisive issues like “guns”, “gays” & “god” which in all reality shouldn’t be political issues.

    5-10% is all we need. Like Ron Paul once said:
    “Speak up, speak often and don’t worry about those that at this point can not understand as they can never un-hear what we tell them.”

    Some of my other favourite Ron Paul quotes:
    “We, as a group, now have a greater moral responsibility to act than those who live in ignorance. Once you become knowledgeable, you have an obligation to do something about it.”

    “I want to use all my strength to resist the notion that I can run your lives or run the economy or run the world. I want to use that strength to repeal and reject that notion and stand up and defend the principles of liberty.”

    http://www.zerohedge.com/contributed/2014-01-31/powers-be-are-secretly-terrified-people%E2%80%99s-power-%E2%80%A6-and-only-pretend-they%E2%80%99re-fi

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  13. Nigel Kearney (747 comments) says:

    If there is one thing ACT supporters should have learned it is that a libertarian leader does not imply a libertarian party or policies. Most of ACT’s political capital was spent creating a hideous governmental behemoth in Auckland and also probably locking in permanent left wing control of the whole region. The approach was actually more libertarian when Prebble was in charge.

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  14. David Garrett (5,134 comments) says:

    tas: I agree…Brash’s sudden announcement on cannabis law reform – and Banks’ strident rejection of it – was probably the biggest disaster of the 2011 campaign….and that is saying something!

    It should only ever be promoted as something there could or should be a referendum on…notwithstanding that allowing people to snort smoke or inject whatever they wish into themselves is also – as I understand it – “classical Liberalism”..

    Nigel Kearney: Very little of ACT’s “political capital” was spent on establishing the super city…it was a Nat Policy which Rodney was given the task of implementing…We used a great deal of political capital getting three strikes, which was NOT National policy, and was constantly being undermined by the duplicitous Simon Power…

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  15. Pete George (21,812 comments) says:

    Some of my other favourite Ron Paul quotes:
    “We, as a group, now have a greater moral responsibility to act than those who live in ignorance. Once you become knowledgeable, you have an obligation to do something about it.”

    It’s common in politics, especially amongst political activists, for someone with certain knowledge to consider a lack of agreement ignorance – and that position is reciprocated.

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  16. Adolf Fiinkensein (2,668 comments) says:

    David Cunliffe has an unsurpassed ability to say the stupidest thing possible at anyparticular time.

    Long may he continue.

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  17. EAD (316 comments) says:

    5-10% is all we need

    “It does not take a majority to prevail… but rather an irate, tireless minority, keen on setting brushfires of freedom in the minds of men” – Samuel Adams

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  18. Weihana (4,475 comments) says:

    tas (438 comments) says:
    February 3rd, 2014 at 9:37 am

    Oh God please don’t bring Cannabis up again. I agree that it should be legalised, but, unless there is political appetite for discussion of the issue, it’s an issue that is best ignored by ACT.

    Absolutely. Let’s get back to the real issues of consequence like what our flag should be! :)

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  19. Weihana (4,475 comments) says:

    David Garrett (4,593 comments) says:
    February 3rd, 2014 at 9:48 am

    It should only ever be promoted as something there could or should be a referendum on…notwithstanding that allowing people to snort smoke or inject whatever they wish into themselves is also – as I understand it – “classical Liberalism”..

    Such is the shallowness of this brand of “Liberalism”. Every issue is reduced to a narrow view of what supposed “forces” individuals impose on one another irrespective of one’s common sense that what can appear to be a private matter does in fact affect other people.

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  20. Nukuleka (77 comments) says:

    ‘Such a policy would be attractive to many voters, but not I suspect in Epsom!’

    Advocating for a policy of legalising drug use will certainly have be attractive to many voters- the down and out dead beat ones, the let’s get high and drive ones, the let it all hang out and don’t bother going to work ones, the we don’t give a damn about the welfare of our kids ones…

    DPF- you’ve lost the plot on this one!

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  21. Weihana (4,475 comments) says:

    Nukuleka (52 comments) says:
    February 3rd, 2014 at 10:03 am

    Advocating for a policy of legalising drug use will certainly have be attractive to many voters- the down and out dead beat ones, the let’s get high and drive ones, the let it all hang out and don’t bother going to work ones, the we don’t give a damn about the welfare of our kids ones…

    Yes, lets lock those parents up for growing plants and smoking it. Dad in prison… mum on the benefit: the head start every child needs. Now lets all pat ourselves on the back for caring about the welfare of kids. :roll:

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  22. Nostalgia-NZ (4,688 comments) says:

    Get real Weihana, it’s only the 4th decade of the war billions need to be spent on this yet. We can’t let people do what they like in their own homes.

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  23. MT_Tinman (2,791 comments) says:

    I don’t give a shit about the drugs issue. It is of no import.

    We are talking here about a (in the foreseeable future) minor party.

    What needs concentrating on is the influence ACT can have on a middle-of-the-road government bent on out-Labouring Labour.

    Hopefully that influence will be liberal countering the we-know-best rubbish from the CCCP and possum-head parties.

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  24. Weihana (4,475 comments) says:

    Nostalgia-NZ (4,432 comments) says:
    February 3rd, 2014 at 10:19 am

    …billions need to be spent on this yet.

    The answer to our unemployment woes. :)

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  25. Jack5 (4,222 comments) says:

    Whale Oil describes Whyte as interminably boring.

    Here’s another quote from the Whale:

    I don;t believe either of those two will increase Act’s vote one bit. Though I have been proven wrong before. However a couple of wet behind the ears academic wonks will hardly give the former Act demographic a stiffy anytime soon.

    I’m not sure begging or praying for a free pass from John Key is much of a political strategy. He’d rather deal with the near dead Winston Peters than these wet behind the ears poseurs.

    ACT will look for a new venue for its annual meeting next year – the Suzuki Swift will be far too big for that.

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  26. ChardonnayGuy (1,023 comments) says:

    Personally, I like what I’ve seen of Whyte and Seymour thus far. At last, a return to classical liberalism proper and an end to populist, opportunist neoconservative nostrums like hardline criminal justice policies, white-anting religious social conservative pontifications and obsessions with fringe micromovements that have no purchase on New Zealand politics. Good to see Whyte pole-axing Maori-bashing and the corporal punishment ban debate. With this new team, ACT will be able to differentiate itself from the Cons. I don’t think Boscawen was able to do that, which proved his undoing.

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  27. Scott (1,614 comments) says:

    I don’t really see the need for the act party to be honest. If they are going to be socially liberal, or “libertarian”, then they will inhabit similar ground to National which has basically given up to the liberal/progressive forces of the Greens and the Labour Party. They seem to be like national but more liberal and may be wanting lower tax rates?

    The unrepresented people in Parliament right now are those who are socially Conservative. Those who believe in Western civilisation, who take pride in our heritage, who believe in traditional moral values. Those people are unrepresented in Parliament right now and that’s why I think that the Conservative party is in with a shot this election. I would imagine that the numbers of libertarians in New Zealand today would be far less than the numbers of people who believe in traditional moral values.

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  28. Daigotsu (446 comments) says:

    Liberalism calls for harsh jail terms for true criminals, but advocates the state not waste time and money chasing blameless criminals who harm nobody, like people who smoke grass, have sex with members of the same sex, or steal the identities of dead children to create fake ID documents just for a laugh.

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  29. dime (8,752 comments) says:

    Scott – i think there is a place for both.

    If Craig could become a bit more skilled, no reason why they cant be a steady 5% party.

    If ACT can get 2 MP’s in this time and build, no reason they cant get back to 5% too.

    ACT have been useful to National. They can take the credit/blame for policies introduced that are outside the norm.

    National are very centre at the moment. Too centre. They need the two smaller parties to drag them to the right a bit.

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  30. backster (2,000 comments) says:

    I think that both Boscowan and Banks have more in common with conservative values than with Libertarian ones. I suspect that the ACT party has been captured by the old Libertarian fringe movement and it would surprise if they are able to capture 1% but good luck to them. I strategic party voted for them past two elections but Conservative next time.

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  31. Weihana (4,475 comments) says:

    Daigotsu (422 comments) says:
    February 3rd, 2014 at 11:13 am

    Liberalism calls for harsh jail terms for true criminals…

    I think the question is more open-ended than that.

    Liberalism, fundamentally, is about liberty and equality. For liberalism the extent that the state uses force against people should correlate with advancing liberty. There seems to be an assumption that harsh consequences advance liberty. Seems fairly intuitive. Murder, for instance, is a very serious threat to liberty so a proportional serious consequence should follow such acts to protect people’s lives. However, I’m not aware that there exists an obvious correlation between the two. Death seems about the worst possible consequence one can impose yet it doesn’t seem to deter or prevent murder from occuring, and places that utilize this punishment don’t seem to necessarily correlate with better outcomes than places that don’t.

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  32. Scott (1,614 comments) says:

    Weihana, as usual I don’t agree with you. I did agree with your first post today but since then not so much.

    People argue about this endlessly but I understand that when we had capital punishment for murder the murder rate in New Zealand was very low. In 1957 you can ask a policeman about the number of murders in the country that year and he could normally count them with just his fingers. Nowadays we have one murder a week or more.

    I predict that if we reintroduce capital punishment for murder then our murder rates would plummet.

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  33. Weihana (4,475 comments) says:

    Scott (1,558 comments) says:
    February 3rd, 2014 at 11:52 am

    I predict that if we reintroduce capital punishment for murder then our murder rates would plummet.

    Why is this not true in many states that retain the death penalty?

    Are you willing to entertain the possibility that changes in the murder rate have to do with something other than whether or not capital punishment is used? Y’know.. like gay marriage. :)

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  34. iMP (2,152 comments) says:

    Are we discussing Walter Whyte who likes meth and is ACTing up a bit?

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  35. Than (371 comments) says:

    I see Colin Craig has become the go-to bogeyman for Cunliffe to try and link with National, even in contexts where it makes no sense. I predicted this several months ago as one of the reasons why an arrangement with the Conservatives would hurt National more than it would help them.

    National should rule out working with the Conservatives sooner rather than later. The longer they leave it, the more Cunliffe will be able to use Craig’s reputation as crazy to damage National by association.

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  36. dime (8,752 comments) says:

    Than – funny how the conservatives are so scary.

    Labour will need to work with the greens, MANA, NZfirst, united and maori. a big coalition of shit

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  37. dime (8,752 comments) says:

    Since this announcement ive seen quite a few posts around the place along the lines of:

    “i live in epsom and im not voting act now”.

    Dime calls bullshit.

    What kind of a MORON would not give the electorate vote to ACT if they wanted a national govt?

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  38. Than (371 comments) says:

    dime – Sure, a lot of people think the Greens/Mana are crazy and a lot of people think Colin Craig is crazy. But Labour has no choice but to work with the Greens, while National does have a choice about working with Craig. They should rule out an arrangement with the Conservatives, and then they’ll be able to justifiably claim to be the only sane option.

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  39. dime (8,752 comments) says:

    Than – then the media will just run the no friends line.. act wont win, blah blah

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  40. Scott (1,614 comments) says:

    I don’t think the Conservatives are crazy at all. In fact the traditional morals of Colin Craig and the Conservative party were totally mainstream New Zealand up to a relatively few years ago.

    Since then we have been deluged with an avalanche of progressive legislation – men marrying men is good, smacking your own children is child abuse, prostitution is a perfectly legal and normal way to earn a living – that our forebears would have considered lunacy.

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  41. iMP (2,152 comments) says:

    Let’s see here a minute..um Consv (not in parliament) have earned 2.1% in the polls off their own free market effort within 2 years.

    ACT (in parl.) have 0.0% after 6 subsidised elections (18 years). Gee this is such a hard decision.

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  42. The Scorned (719 comments) says:

    …Such is the shallowness of this brand of “Liberalism”. Every issue is reduced to a narrow view of what supposed “forces” individuals impose on one another irrespective of one’s common sense that what can appear to be a private matter does in fact affect other people.

    “affecting other people” is irrelevant and not the issue..the real question is…are the RIGHTS of any individual violated by an action? Individual rights are the language through which Libertarianism-Classical liberalism ism is spoken. Finally ACT have leaders who actually believe and espouse the Liberal values the party was founded on….which were NOT tired old anti freedom Conservative ones.

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  43. The Scorned (719 comments) says:

    From someone who was there…

    Regular listeners to this programme will know that I am no great fan of the ACT party. Deborah Coddington & I were involved in the very first discussions with Roger Douglas, Rodney Hide & Derek Quigley in which the formation of ACT was discussed. As freedom-lovers, we balked at the new forms of compulsion being proposed by Sir Roger in his book, Unfinished Business, which was intended as a blueprint for the new party. It became clear to us that he had not really abandoned the mindset of his socialist past, that he still believed the state should force people to do what he thought was good for them, that he differed from his former Labour Party colleagues only as to the form that force should take, & that the value of personal freedom weighed on his mind not one jot. His attack on the cash economy & insistence that there should be “stiff penalties” for those who didn’t follow “correct procedures” regarding his precious GST – the Government Slavery Tax – sent chills down my spine. After a few weeks Deborah & I decided to have nothing more to do with ACT, & I began referring to them as the Association of Compulsion-Touters.

    Have they learned anything? Certainly their pragmatism carried them into Parliament, which would not have happened had they adopted a strict libertarian platform. But it’s obvious that something is eating away at them. Their weekend conference heard a constant refrain about the need to return to principles & stop sidling up to despicable opportunists like the National Party in the name of expediency. The problem is, ACT were never clear about their principles to begin with, so they don’t really know what it is they should be repairing to. The references to personal freedom & responsibility in their founding documents were written by Ian Fraser, who also left in disgust early on in the piece & went on to form Libertarianz.

    Lindsay Perigo

    Hopefully those days are behind us and liberty gets a chance…

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  44. Psycho Milt (1,975 comments) says:

    In fact the traditional morals of Colin Craig and the Conservative party were totally mainstream New Zealand up to a relatively few years ago.

    Since then we have been deluged with an avalanche of progressive legislation - decriminalising homosexuality, criminalising rape within marriage, allowing people to import stuff without a permit, making employers pay women the same rate for the same work – that our forebears would have considered lunacy.

    FIFY

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  45. Weihana (4,475 comments) says:

    The Scorned (717 comments) says:
    February 3rd, 2014 at 1:48 pm

    “affecting other people” is irrelevant and not the issue..the real question is…are the RIGHTS of any individual violated by an action? Individual rights are the language through which Libertarianism-Classical liberalism ism is spoken.

    Such is the circular a priori reasoning of which reasonable folk can find themselves bashing their head against in an effort to discuss any issue with a libertarian.

    Why is government regulation evil? Because it uses force! Why is the government not allowed to use force? Because it violates my rights! Why is it your right? Because they are using force against me! And around and around ad infinitum…

    What affects other people is at the core of every political and ethical question because how people are affected influences and determines how they will respond and act. No amount of labelling drug use as a “right” will distract most people from the common knowledge that drug abusers (whether legal or illegal) impact other people in a negative way and consequently this argument alone will never prevail to achieve sensible reform that minimizes harm.

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  46. lolitasbrother (346 comments) says:

    As far as I am concerned it is demeaning for NZ Nat to ask people to vote ACT, Epsom or anywhere.
    ACT is dead . They ACT spent 15 years trying to disintegrate and they succeeded with elitist crap stuff like Catherine Judd.
    ACT is almost universally despised and NZ Nat can let go,

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  47. Goldsmith (15 comments) says:

    Scott – You’re absolutely correct. Colin Craig is not crazy at all as made out to be by the nasty leftist media and liberal dope smoking far right.

    Funny that – when someone speaks honestly using normal everyday conversation, they are called crazy, yet when a politician spins bull-shit like a helicopter all day long – he is considered deep, intelligent, and sophisticated!

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  48. Goldsmith (15 comments) says:

    iMP… you’ve hit the nail on the head.

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  49. Jack5 (4,222 comments) says:

    Dime posted at 12.36 about Epsom, which the now libertarian ACT wants National to hand over to it:

    What kind of a MORON would not give the electorate vote to ACT if they wanted a national govt?

    That’s a really sophisticated strategy, Dime, and will win over thousands:”Vote for us or you’re a moron!”.

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  50. wrightingright (132 comments) says:

    I’m an Epsom resident and I’ll be changing to voting for Seymour now that ACT has Whyte as their new leader! Much better than Banks.

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  51. Tom Jackson (2,235 comments) says:

    Austrian economics.

    Lol

    Evidence free…

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  52. publicwatchdog (1,823 comments) says:

    Will new ACT leader Jamie Whyte answer THIS question?

    (Will NBR allow this question ‘to be put’?

    If not – why not? :)

    __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    http://www.nbr.co.nz/ask-jamie

    Jamie – given that ‘talk is cheap’ and proven track record is the best indicator of how truly principled are political parties, leaders and candidates, can you please provide any evidence to prove that YOU supported ACT’s purported principles of ‘one law for all’, and ‘personal responsibility’, by publicly agreeing that the (now) defendant John Archibald Banks should be committed to trial for alleged electoral fraud?

    If not – why not?

    Kind regards,

    Penny Bright

    ‘Anti-corruption / anti-privatisation campaigner’

    2013 Auckland Mayoral candidate

    http://www.pennybright4mayor.org.nz
    http://www.pennybright4epsom.org.nz
    http://www.occupyaucklandvsaucklandcouncilappeal.org.nz

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  53. David Garrett (5,134 comments) says:

    That has to be the most illiterate comment on ACT ever made…and that’s saying something!

    What exactly does “…elitist crap stuff like Catherine Judd” mean? Is that some sort of tortuous reference to Charter Schools?

    don’t fret Lolita’s sibling…ACT will manage without your vote…

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  54. Tom Jackson (2,235 comments) says:

    Libertarians seem to have no way of accounting for an initial distribution of ownership that doesn’t seem arbitrary. Locke had real trouble with this.

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  55. Than (371 comments) says:

    Than – then the media will just run the no friends line.. act wont win, blah blah

    So what if they do? Unless you think that will hurt National’s share of the party vote, what does it matter?

    The Conservatives got 2.6% of the party vote last election. When they didn’t get in half of that was redistributed to National anyway, so ~1.3% is the magic number. If an arrangement with Colin Craig costs National more than 1.3% of their own party vote (and it would, Cunliffe is already milking it for all it’s worth) it’s a net loss. If the goal is getting a National-led government for a 3rd term then an arrangement with the Conservatives would be a huge mistake.

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  56. Chuck Bird (4,410 comments) says:

    Than, you obviously do not understand how MMP works. I will not try to explain how works but I can assure John Key other senior National MPs do know how it works and will be acting in the best interest of National leading a government.

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  57. nasska (9,519 comments) says:

    Agree with Than….any votes the CCCP pick up are going to be cannibalised off National. If JK refuses deals or accommodation with Craig’s Crazies present National voters will be disinclined to stray.

    If they do & the Conservatives poll less than 5% (which is probable) & have no chance of an electorate seat, all the Godnutters & Chem Trails loops will be faced with wasting their votes if they take a chance on the CCCP.

    Oh dear!

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  58. RRM (8,988 comments) says:

    If not – why not?

    Because you are a raving loon Penny, and your single issue stuck record dribble is of no interest to anybody (other than a few smelly, nose pierced, dreadlocked freaks.)

    I hope this answers your question.

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  59. Chuck Bird (4,410 comments) says:

    So Nasska, you also think you know more than JK how MMP works? He has not said he will gift the CCCP a seat at this stage. However, if and when he does it will be to help increase the chance of National governing. JK may be a lot of things but one thing he is not and that is stupid.

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  60. nasska (9,519 comments) says:

    I reckon that JK knows a lot more than me about MMP Chuck but his knowledge is not necessarily shared by all those who have commented on this thread.

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  61. David Garrett (5,134 comments) says:

    RRM: ” smelly nose peirced dreadlocked freaks”…Love your work!!

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  62. publicwatchdog (1,823 comments) says:

    Miss this did you RRM and David Garrett?

    http://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/EN/AboutCouncil/HowCouncilWorks/Elections/Documents/mayorfinalresults2013.pdf

    As the fourth highest-polling Auckland Mayoral candidate in 2013, it appears that nearly 12,000 Auckland voters may have a different view?

    “Because you are a raving loon Penny, and your single issue stuck record dribble is of no interest to anybody (other than a few smelly, nose pierced, dreadlocked freaks.)

    ummmm……. perhaps either of you would like to point a stick (as it were) at any evidence of the public support YOU have for your views?

    When you’re ready …………………..

    Kind regards,

    Penny Bright

    ‘Anti-corruption / anti-privatisation campaigner’

    2013 Auckland Mayoral candidate

    http://www.pennybright4mayor.org.nz
    http://www.pennybright4epsom.org.nz
    http://www.occupyaucklandvsaucklandcouncilappeal.org.nz

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  63. David Garrett (5,134 comments) says:

    Where do you get the money to establish and maintain all those websites Penny?

    Me? A bit of law, and a bit of this and that….

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  64. nasska (9,519 comments) says:

    Waterwoman

    ….”As the fourth highest-polling Auckland Mayoral candidate in 2013, it appears that nearly 12,000 Auckland voters may have a different view?”…..

    There were 340339 valid votes cast in the 2013 election out of which you received 11619. That suggests that there’s a small surplus of sane Auckland residents who think you’re bonkers….like about 328720 of them. :)

    Ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auckland_local_elections,_2013

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  65. wrightingright (132 comments) says:

    David, given how utter rubbish looking Penny’s websites look I’d suspect it doesn’t take much money at all to maintain them….

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  66. OneTrack (1,967 comments) says:

    “ACT is almost universally despised …”. in the hard-left Labour/Green caucus offices as ACT are a barrier to the comrades taking power.

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  67. Scott Chris (5,678 comments) says:

    any votes the CCCP pick up are going to be cannibalised off National

    Hmm, I don’t know. If this blog is any indication then former ACT voters such as Dime, Chuck Bird, Jack5, Reid and a few others I can’t think of off the top of my head will all be voting for the CCCP this time round.

    Maybe that is why ACT has been forced to redefine itself and in the process, thrown off its conservative shackles.

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  68. nasska (9,519 comments) says:

    Scott Chris

    In the 2011 general Election ACT received 1.07% of the party vote….they will lose a few floaters to the CCCP but not enough to make much difference to Colin’s lot.

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  69. bhudson (4,720 comments) says:

    There are rich pickings in the 1,595 votes they can target from the Libertarianz

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  70. RichardX (291 comments) says:

    nasska (8,810 comments) says:
    February 3rd, 2014 at 7:25 pm
    Waterwoman
    ….”As the fourth highest-polling Auckland Mayoral candidate in 2013, it appears that nearly 12,000 Auckland voters may have a different view?”…..
    There were 340339 valid votes cast in the 2013 election out of which you received 11619. That suggests that there’s a small surplus of sane Auckland residents who think you’re bonkers….like about 328720 of them.
    Ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auckland_local_elections,_2013

    I think you are being cruel to the failed candidate
    If she maintains the same level of improvement that she experienced from 2010 to 2013, she could be mayor by 2058
    Thankfully I won’t be around to see it, but then she probably won’t be either

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  71. RRM (8,988 comments) says:

    They voted for your good name Penny.

    It starts with a “B” – putting you at or near the top of the list. Probably the first list you’ve been near the top of in your life – congratulations! :-)

    Now, I have no doubt that of your 11619 votes, a healthy 750 or so might have come from the dope-fucked, unemployable worthless eaters who count Occupy Auckland as the best thing they’ve ever done. But the rest of them ticked they read the list from the top down, your name came up first, and they were in a hurry to get out of there because KFC was calling their name.

    Thought exercise for you:

    Stand at the bus stop at the bottom of Queen Street at 0745am on any weekday, you will be able to see roughly 12,000 employed, hardworking Aucklanders… and approximately NONE of them would have voted for you, your politics of envy, your infantile websites, or your paranoid delusions about how evil white bastards are shafting the little guy.

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  72. KevinH (1,128 comments) says:

    Libertarians are the new age romantics of politics, all philosophy and very little substance.
    The fact is nothing will happen in Epsom unless John Key gives them the nod, to be or not to be.
    Once approval has been supplied, Act could stand a chimpanzee and Epsom will vote them in, sad but true.
    Best wishes to Dr Whyte but be warned, politics is a brutal business, dog eat dog.

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  73. wrightingright (132 comments) says:

    bhudson , if the Libz voters had voted for ACT instead last election then ACT would have one more MP and be in a much much much healthier situation right now!

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  74. Samuel Smith (266 comments) says:

    Bye, bye Act.

    Seymour’s chances of winning are about as high as seeing a Republican president in the White House before 2024.

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  75. RRM (8,988 comments) says:

    Did you vote for Penny, Hamnida?

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  76. Samuel Smith (266 comments) says:

    RRM = No, John Minto.

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  77. ChardonnayGuy (1,023 comments) says:

    No, but CC is an advocate for weird “alternative remedies” like chiropracty and homeopathy…

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