Gamekeeper turned poacher

March 25th, 2014 at 11:00 am by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

’s new Internet Party will have a couple of New Plymouth connections.

Veteran journalist and journalism tutor has taken up the role of media adviser and would be writing the new party’s housing and education policies. He had already finished the environment policy.

Tucker is a very respected journalism tutor. He’s taught many of today’s journalists.

At the moment the party was polling at 2.6 per cent, he said.

So here’s my question to any of those journalists who were trained by Jim Tucker. Considering that the Internet Party hasn’t registered above 0.1% in any published poll, should a Jim Tucker trained journalist just report such an assertion without challenge, knowing that gullible members of the public may read it and assume it to be true?

Or would a Jim Tucker trained journalist ask the person making the claim to substantiate it?

Also would a Jim Tucker trained journalist upon being told they are supporting the party because Dotcom was a visionary, ask the subject of the interview how much they are being paid to take up the role of media advisor?

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33 Responses to “Gamekeeper turned poacher”

  1. ROJ (114 comments) says:

    Don’t even think that they get to that level when adding in the Mana lot. But an indication ?

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  2. Manolo (13,517 comments) says:

    How many guns for hire, read mercenaries, out there ready to be bought by the obese German?

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  3. gazzmaniac (2,319 comments) says:

    I hope for his sake that Tucker asked for payment in advance.

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  4. All_on_Red (1,557 comments) says:

    “Tucker is a very respected journalism tutor. He’s taught many of today’s journalists.”

    Hahahahaha.

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  5. beautox (438 comments) says:

    “Respected Journalist” – were you trying to be funny? As for learning journalism – what does that involve exactly? Surely in this country it means : making shit up, getting your facts wrong and failing to understand the basics.

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  6. Reid (16,213 comments) says:

    Jim Tucker has taken up the role of media adviser and would be writing the new party’s housing and education policies. He had already finished the environment policy.

    So what does a journalist know about policy development? Or does the substance matter less than the appearance? Or does “writing the policy” mean to a journalist the press package that accompanies the policy, in the same way the “product” means to a marketer the packaging and advertising, never mind the hundreds of engineers and operations staff who actually design, produce and deliver the damn thing?

    He’s taught many of today’s journalists.

    Yes All on Red. Hardly a mark of honour, is it.

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  7. greenjacket (452 comments) says:

    Huh? DPF – you misunderstand the role of a journalist – they are to take press releases and prepare them for wider publication. Why would they ask questions of the subject? If you want questions, then read a blogsite.

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  8. dime (9,805 comments) says:

    “He’s taught many of today’s journalists.” – lmao that’s something to be proud of!

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  9. davidp (3,574 comments) says:

    Journalists are paid pretty poorly. Partly because rephrasing press releases and interviewing local moaners isn’t seen as valued work, and partly because print media is a legacy industry that doesn’t have much of a future. This lack of pay explains why they always breathlessly report the number of people working for a government agency or business earning over $100k. Because for most journalists, $100k is an unimaginable fortune. This also explains why so many journalists will prostitute themselves for Dotcom. They’ve always dreamed of earning a new iMac.

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  10. Don the Kiwi (1,684 comments) says:

    So He’s to blame for all the bullshit that passes nowadays for journalism !

    Liberal – mainly left wing – propaganda that infests our media. Journalists have to be lower than car and insurance salesmen – and lawyers. And Labour party politicians.

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  11. dime (9,805 comments) says:

    “Partly because rephrasing press releases and interviewing local moaners isn’t seen as valued work”

    lol

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  12. band4u (18 comments) says:

    So he taught today’s journaists…most of whom cannot use correct grammar or construct a sentance that actually says what they mean? Journalists who seem to be totally gullible and take politicains at face value? Actually quite a good fit for the Internet Party and Mana I would have thought!

    I wouldnt be too trusting of ‘published polls’ however. These polls showed National could govern alone just prior to the last election and they only sqeeked in thanks to a ‘cup of tea’. They do not reflect the fact that people have two votes and sensible folk vote strategically.

    The same pollsters didnt even have NZF registering 5% and were ‘surprised’ on Election night. They seek to shape public opinion rather than reflect it and a waste of time.

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  13. Pete George (23,427 comments) says:

    “At the moment the party was polling at 2.6 per cent, he said.”

    I couldn’t find how to contact Tucker so asked Internet Party Chief Executive Vikram Kumar.

    The figure is from independent polling commissioned by and for the Internet Party.

    Without any details it’s not possible to judge that polling.

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  14. Rex Widerstrom (5,346 comments) says:

    The people to blame for the abysmal state of journalism in this country are the proprietors, who’ve slashed numbers and who pack newsrooms with inexperienced young journos because older, experienced practitioners expect decent wages. And then sent subediting offshore where it’s done by backpackers with no idea of the people or geography or issues they’re reading about, and sometimes a minimal grasp of English.

    So the senior journos all take the filthy lucre of politicians and corporates, and are paid to bamboozle the less experienced.

    The questions posed by DPF all need to be asked, and it’s not Tucker’s fault they most likely won’t be. He’s doing what his employer expects of him… and surely no one here would suggest he has a greater duty to the public?

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  15. davidp (3,574 comments) says:

    I sort of feel badly for some journalists. Say you’re an idealistic 20 year old who wants to break big stories, hold the powerful to account, and make the world a better place. You’re happy to earn $30k to do this. But instead you’re sent out to interview someone who wants to whinge about the government not giving them enough money. You realise that they’re a party stooge… the fact that someone like Jacinda Ardern tipped you off about the “story” is confirmation of that. You notice all the empty booze bottles, the satellite TV, and the remains of a KFC diet. But your editor is going to be pissed off if you return to the office without a story, so you snap a couple of photos and listen to them moan for half an hour. You probably feel a bit dirty, especially when you consider the only reason you’re debasing yourself is to sell local classified ads.

    Given this sort of pitiful situation, it is understandable that you’d throw yourself at Dotcom like a 40 year old hooker needing money to finance her next meth fix. You get a new iMac, and maybe Dotcom will let you help out on his next album or he’ll make you his press secretary or something.

    So that explains Fisher, Thompson, Bradbury, and Tucker. I suspect Green MPs, Labour MPs, Winston Peters, Hone Harawira, and Graeme Edgeler have a similarly pitiful existence and that explains their need to prostitute themselves to an international criminal and confidence trickster.

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  16. Alan (1,087 comments) says:

    I’m sure he’d tell you it was private polling, doubtless push polling.

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  17. Pete George (23,427 comments) says:

    More from Vikram – he says they won’t give out polling details, and points out that other parties don’t either.

    The Internet Party is happy for people to make up their own mind about its polling numbers via public, widely accepted results that are likely to show a rapidly increasing level of support in time

    We'll have to see over the next month whether public polls start to reflect similar support. Obviously publicity around the possible Mana cooperation and their launch this Thursday could make a difference.

    One thing in their favour is that the media will give them a chance to boost their profile, although their main target is younger demographics via social media.

    Internet Party Thursday launch on track

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  18. Reid (16,213 comments) says:

    So that explains Fisher, Thompson, Bradbury, and Tucker.

    But it doesn’t explain people like Campbell who earns far more than most people, journalists included.

    At some point some journalists decide to abrogate their professional ethics and mis-use their trusted position to promote lies and this also applies to others behind the scenes like editors and sub-editors.

    This would be fine if they revealed to those in the unthinking public who can’t see straight through them that this is what they are doing, but they continue literally to pray on said public abusing the hard-won established brand of their respective mastheads to disguise their agenda and the foolish executives either don’t even see them doing it or worse, tolerate it.

    The behaviour of all involved in this charade disgusts me because it’s misusing an ancient and trusted profession not to do good but to do evil. Not to mention the idiots are paying the price for it because this is the precise reason why both TV and print ratings are looking like a dangerous ski-slope while said idiot executives scratch their heads and wonder why.

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  19. Viking2 (11,367 comments) says:

    This is gunna piss you all off even more.

    Mega poised for $210m backdoor NZX listing

    The online-storage company Mega – launched by Kim Dotcom last year – is doing a back-door listing on the New Zealand stock exchange.

    The deal was unveiled this morning and will see Mega merge with NZX-listed TRS Investments.

    TRS will acquire all of Mega’s shares for $210 million and Mega’s shareholders will be issued 700 new TRS shares.

    Following the transaction, Mega’s existing shareholders will hold 99 per cent of TRS shares. TRS will change its name to Mega after the deal.

    The merger is subject to shareholder approval. The majority of TRS is controlled by shareholders Paul and Lynette Choiselat.

    Mega chief executive Stephen Hall said it was hoped the merger would be finished by the end of May.

    Hall said the proposed deal had been in the works for “some time”.

    “It’s obviously been part of the Mega’s strategy for a long time to become listed,” he said.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=11225952

    Apparently the internal “spies” didn’t tell you’se all about this.

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  20. OneTrack (2,973 comments) says:

    davidp – Do you really think that they think like that? Or is it just as likely as that they think that they are there to blow open the big story of “poverty” and how evil those neolibs are?

    If it was like you say, we wouldn’t have to rely on KiwiBlog and WhaleOil to call out the Labour Party clutching at straws and presenting useless examples of poverty who seem to be always creaming it on the welfare state – the 20-years olds would do it for us. (Note to Labour – if you want to do better propaganda – hide the Sky TV)

    But, no. They, and all their friends, are probably Green Party members there to save the world. It will be another twenty years before their critical thinking skills kick in and by then it is too late.

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  21. OneTrack (2,973 comments) says:

    “This is gunna piss you all off even more.”

    No, it’s not. He doesn’t owe me any money.

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  22. mikenmild (11,246 comments) says:

    Reid
    ‘an ancient and trusted profession’
    You’re kidding, right?

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  23. Reid (16,213 comments) says:

    You’re kidding, right?

    It was until the early 1980’s mm, then it started heading south. All over the world. Hmmm, never really thought about why that is, but that’s my observation, what’s your mileage on the timing?

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  24. Viking2 (11,367 comments) says:

    Time for the naysayers and doubters to start to take this seriously I’d suggest. To not do so will ignore the potential results.
    Leaving the man himself (Dot Com), aside the process that appears to be eventuating is world leading in politics and has been said many times will bring out the can’t be bothered because its always just more of the same. e.g. where is the difference between what Labour has done and National have done. Neither have changed the others policies and law except at the fringes.

    Rodney Hyde was exactly right on the weekend. Key is only about staying to course. why would he do anything at all?

    Ok, so I still like the man and much of what he does but the world never remains in limbo but NZ politics does and has since Roger Douglas last took the scalpel to our budget.

    Greens gone, Labour diminished, Maori gone. The Nats are in a hard place to win.

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  25. mikenmild (11,246 comments) says:

    Oh, rubbish. Journalism has never enjoyed such a mythical age of standards and excellence.

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  26. Yoza (1,774 comments) says:

    Funny:
    davidp (3,276 comments) says:
    March 25th, 2014 at 11:32 am

    This lack of pay explains why they always breathlessly report the number of people working for a government agency or business earning over $100k. Because for most journalists, $100k is an unimaginable fortune.

    This may come as a bit of a shock to you Davey, but for the vast majority of New Zealanders a hundred thousand dollars is an unimaginable fortune. It is kind of funny watching those who supposedly support greater autonomy for concentrated financial capital getting all hot and bothered when one of those concentrations questions the authority of a foreign ‘big government’ to limit that autonomy.

    Intellectual property laws are a bit of a crock. How is it ok for a song writer to maintain ownership over their work, yet a painter or a sculptor loses ownership of their work once it is sold? (Sorry, off topic – just saying is all).

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  27. Judith (8,532 comments) says:

    Rex Widerstrom (5,084 comments) says:
    March 25th, 2014 at 11:54 am
    The people to blame for the abysmal state of journalism in this country are …

    … the general public, the audiences who continue to read/watch/listen to the crap that is produced like mindless imbeciles.

    If the public stopped ‘consuming the product’ the representation of it would soon change.

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  28. Rex Widerstrom (5,346 comments) says:

    That would be true, Judith, if there was any alternative.

    Yes blogs, and particularly Whaleoil, do a sterling job of breaking news but, with all due respect to the hard work Cam puts in, it relies on whistleblowers to do much of the work. Until blogs hit on a formula that adequately monetises what they do – and I think that’s where your point about the audience’s perception of value most resonates – they won’t have the resources to do investigative work.

    It still frustrates me immensely that the right continually laments the state of the media, yet does nothing about it. Where, for instance, is Radio Liberty? That could have been developed into a service to rival National Radio but instead it was underfunded from the start and left to wither.

    At least Dotcom puts his money where his big mouth is (albeit for self-promotional purposes). I have 5/8 of FA but I’ve rolled up my sleeves are worked for contra and a pittance to get newspapers, magazines or radio stations off the ground before, and would consider such a contribution again provided I could see the backers were serious and it wasn’t just a vanity venture.

    The old restrictions on licences etc are gone. Don’t like the media? Shut up and start your own, just like Alistair Thompson did. (I mean that generally, it’s not aimed specifically at Judith).

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  29. PaulL (6,030 comments) says:

    @Yoza_troll: song writers and musicians can sell rights to their songs, as sculptors can sell rights to their work. It is true that it’s commonly accepted for sculptors to sell the rights with the work, and for musicians not to. But consider also that it’s common for sculptures to be one-offs, and songs to be reproduced many times. The business model for music doesn’t really provide for the rights to be sold with the song unless you’re selling the song to a single person. But plenty of musicians have sold rights to their music to their record company. And I seem to recall Michael Jackson buying rights to most of the Beatles songs.

    In short, you’re repeating one of the random lefty lines that somehow an “artist” should keep owning their work after they’ve sold it. But actually it’s a commercial transaction like any other. When I write software I can sell a copy of it and keep copyright, or I can sell the rights to it. An iPhone app developer typically does the former, a contract programmer typically does the latter. There’s nothing special about the “arts” in this respect, they’re just contractual relationships.

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  30. doggone7 (769 comments) says:

    Would a Jim Tucker trained journalist ask him if he realised that taking a job would see scorn lumped on him?

    Would a Jim Tucker trained journalist ask him if he realised that he is only supposed to take approved jobs?

    Would a Jim Tucker trained journalist ask him what his response is when he sees assertions posted on political blog sites like this with misleading headlines knowing that gullible members of the public will read them and assume them to be true?

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  31. Barnsley Bill (983 comments) says:

    We should be encouraging more of these left wing idiots to take a knee and eat the fatty german sausage. They are going to make themselves unemployable with what is coming down the chute.
    Kim Dotcom will have done more to clean out the left wing media than poisoning the tim tams for the weekly biscuit club could ever do.
    The stink from cuddling this disgusting human being will never wash off those that have cuddled him.
    They are going to have to flee NZ to find work.

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  32. igm (1,413 comments) says:

    If Tucker is responsible for the rabble masquerading as today’s journalists, the obese criminal has a lot to concern himself with.

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  33. Yoza (1,774 comments) says:

    Kim Dotcom has done a great service to this country by revealing the obsequious nature of our clandestine security apparatus, we should be more worried about paying for a secret police outfit that is essentially run for the benefit of the bosses in Washington.

    The whole Dotcom versus US big corporate media has been played out before:

    “But to say that the facts of the Megaupload case are rare would be to ignore one invaluable precedent, one that the officials who wrote the indictment seem to have been doing their best to hide.

    Before there was a federal raid in 2012 on the Dotcom mansion, there was a massive lawsuit filed back in 2007 that ended in 2010. Before copyright holders like Universal Music pushed for action by the Justice Department, there was a titanic copyright holder called Viacom.

    And before there was Megaupload, there was a site called YouTube.”

    The difference being the size of the protagonists. The comparatively little Viacom going after a monster like YouTube/Google as opposed to the massive corporations going after the comparatively little Megaupload. It kinda looks like justice exists for those who can afford to pay the most – a scenario most of the judiciary and their apologists are desperate to conceal. If the justice system exists to serve vast swathes of capital we shouldn’t be surprised when a minor player, like Dotcom, attempts to use a similar method to exert influence in our political process.

    When we operate in a system designed to accommodate the influence of wealth it seems strange that those who are the greatest advocates of this system react in an extraordinary manner to someone exploiting it to suit their own ends.
    Shouldn’t the happy-clappy capitalists frequenting Kiwiblog be celebrating Dotcom’s enterprise?

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