Parliament Today 21 May 2014

May 21st, 2014 at 12:38 pm by Jordan.M

Questions for Oral Answer.

Questions for Minister 2.00PM -3.00PM.

  1. Hon DAVID CUNLIFFE to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  2. DAVID BENNETT to the Minister of Finance: In preparing Budget 2014, what advice did the Government receive on how responsible fiscal management will take pressure off interest rates for New Zealand households and businesses?
  3. Hon DAVID PARKER to the Minister of Finance: Has he received any report from the Treasury disproving the analysis from Westpac’s chief economist that a proposed 15 percent tax on capital gains on investment property would have a significant effect on the net present value of residential rental property investments; if so, will he table that Treasury report?
  4. METIRIA TUREI to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  5. MAGGIE BARRY to the Minister of Education: How will Budget 2014 continue to support the education system?
  6. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: What consultation with general practitioners, nurses, and district health boards did he undertake before announcing free doctors’ visits for children aged under 13?
  7. Hon PHIL HEATLEY to the Minister for Social Development: What measures does Budget 2014 contain to support vulnerable children?
  8. Su’a WILLIAM SIO to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement that he has a “plan to deliver a brighter future for New Zealand.”?
  9. JULIE ANNE GENTER to the Minister for Building and Construction: Will he change the Construction Contracts Amendment Bill or promote other legislative change to ensure that money held by a main contractor, for payment to subcontractors when their work is completed, is not used for any purpose other than paying those subcontractors?
  10. JACQUI DEAN to the Minister for the Environment: How does Budget 2014 help communities and councils manage their local freshwater resources?
  11. Hon MARYAN STREET to the Minister of Justice: Does she stand by all her answers to Oral Question No. 11 yesterday?
  12. ANDREW WILLIAMS to the Minister of Finance: How much have departmental output expenses been cut in Budget 2014 for the 2014/15 financial year compared with the 2013/14 financial year?

Today Labour are asking whether the Prime Minister stands by all his statements, capital gains tax, free doctors visits, whether National is delivering a brighter future, and whether the Minister of Justice stands by her answers yesterday. The Greens are asking whether the Prime Minister stands by all his statements and payments to building contractors. New Zealand First is asking about cuts in departmental budgets as a result of the budget.

Patsy question of the day goes to Maggie Barry for Question 5: How will Budget 2014 continue to support the education system?

General Debate 3.00PM-4.00 PM 

A wide ranging consisting of 12 speeches of no more than 5 minutes in length. Amusing and informative.

Valedictory Speech of Shane Jones MP 5.30PM-5.45PM

The Valedictory Speech of Shane Jones, a Labour List MP. His Wikipedia biography is here.

Government Bills 4.00PM – 5.30PM and 7.30PM-10.00PM.

1. Appropriation (2014/15 Estimates) Bill - Second Reading

2. Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Bill (No 3)- Third Reading

3. Food Bill - Third Reading

The Appropriation (2014/15 Estimates) Bill (The Budget) is  being guided through the house by the Minister of Finance, Bill English. This bill seeks parliamentary authorisation of the individual appropriations contained in The Estimates of Appropriations for the Government of New Zealand for the year ending 30 June 2015 .

The Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Bill (No 3) is being guided throught the house by the Minister of Local Government, Paula Bennett. This bill would implement the Government’s second phase of legislative reform relating to the operation of local government.

The Food Bill is being guided through the house by the Minister for Food Safety, Nikki Kaye. The bill introduces substantial reforms to the regulatory regime for the safety and suitability of food.

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10 Responses to “Parliament Today 21 May 2014”

  1. OneTrack (3,117 comments) says:

    Cunliffe Q1 – what a goose.

    edit and Turei

    We need a real opposition.

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  2. Ed Snack (1,883 comments) says:

    Re Capital Gains Tax, can anyone give a moral case for the tax ? I mean other than “you have some money, we want it, hand it over” that we’ve seen so far. And distinguish between those trading in items for the purpose of making a profit and gains in the value of an asset.

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  3. igm (1,413 comments) says:

    Cinliffe is a goose, but what the hell is that weasel Parker? Because he went broke playing with property, does he want to cripple everyone else. He went under because of sleezy dealings, not becoming of a leeching Labourite trough swiller! Bet he gets well served in the reaming room . . . loser.

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  4. chris (647 comments) says:

    I know the “Does he stand by all his statements?” question (asked twice today!) is an attempt to score political points by catching them out with a supplementary question, but it’s all so childish. Did National do this silly crap too when they were in opposition?

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  5. Bill Courtney (161 comments) says:

    Good to see that Maggie Barry still knows how to ask a question. I was at the Education and Science Committee two weeks ago to make our submission on Bill no. 2 and listened to about two and half hours of submissions and Committee questioning. In that entire time, Maggie Barry did not say a single word – not one. Honest.

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  6. UrbanNeocolonialist (289 comments) says:

    Ed: Can you make a moral case for any tax? The fine art of taxation is to do it in a way that (hopefully) minimises that harm it does. To prevent revolution it also needs to take more from the wealthy and channel it to the poor to balance the flow in the other direction due to commerce.

    Not taxing residential capital gains is hugely distortionary to investment as the returns for investing in a house are 50% higher as a result (If you are on 33% marginal tax rate that most are). That in turn pumps up house prices, and has created overpriced housing and huge external debt for NZ to service with no real benefit to the country – we would have been massively better off if that money had been put into something that generated wealth for NZ. It also makes borrowing (competing for the same investment dollar) more expensive for actual wealth/growth creating domestic industries, with interest rates in NZ being quite high by OECD standards.

    Fat chance of changing it now given that majority of population feel they are personally benefiting (even if it hurt NZ as a whole). Politically the only way to bring it in would be for successive governments to chip away at the edges, start small and grow it over time so that change only additionally affects a few percent of population in any year. Eg target only expensive homes and gradually reduce it over time (or let bracket creep via inflation do that for you).

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  7. chris (647 comments) says:

    So if CGT is the golden bullet to stop increasing house prices, then why is housing just as / more “unaffordable” in Sydney and Melbourne? Noting of course that Australia does have a CGT.

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  8. G152 (350 comments) says:

    Where was Peters today?
    Was he dodging a question or three?

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  9. ross411 (842 comments) says:

    chris (477 comments) says:
    May 21st, 2014 at 2:17 pm
    So if CGT is the golden bullet to stop increasing house prices, then why is housing just as / more “unaffordable” in Sydney and Melbourne? Noting of course that Australia does have a CGT.

    Kiwipower and rolling blackouts from similar implementations elsewhere, worthwhileness of windfarms based on how well it works elsewhere, decrying how well charter schools work ignoring their working well elsewhere, and now ignoring how well CGT works in other countries. All of these things have been detailed in comments and stories previously on Kiwiblog. I’m sure there’s more.

    It’s almost like ostriches with their heads buried in the sands.

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  10. OneTrack (3,117 comments) says:

    “So if CGT is the golden bullet to stop increasing house prices, then why is housing just as / more “unaffordable” ..,”

    Maybe because a logical reaction to having to pay a CG Tax is to put the price up when you sell so you get the same in the hand before the tax was imposed? No, that can’t be it – that would be human nature and labour doesnt seem to understand.

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