Stuff rates the leaders

May 18th, 2014 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

Will the real please stand up?

That’s the message from experts who claim the Labour leader is failing to connect with the voting public because he’s not being true to himself.

It’s a sentiment reflected strongly in the latest Stuff.co.nz/Ipsos political poll in which people were asked to play a word association game with Cunliffe and Prime Minister .

Asked to sum up the leaders in one word, people opted for “good” when describing Key, but words included confidence, arrogance, charismatic, leader and a suite of words lumped together as “profanity”.

For Cunliffe, words like untrustworthy, arrogant and shifty were more likely to be used along with trying, promising and inexperienced.

What would be interesting is to see the breakdown by how people say they will vote.

Former TVNZ political commentator turned media trainer Bill Ralston said Cunliffe came across like he “doesn’t know himself”.

“He always appears to be acting. You know, ‘I’m going to be angry now, I’m going to be funny now, I’m going to be serious’. I don’t know what or who the real David Cunliffe is but we haven’t seen him yet. It’s that inauthenticity that’s the issue. He just is not pitching himself as a normal person.”

Ralston, who helped train Key, said the Prime Minister and New Zealand First’s Winston Peters were leaders who had “clearly identified characteristics and personalities – you can almost guess what they are going to say or do next whereas Cuniffe, there’s something that just doesn’t ring true”.

Cunliffe, who at times proved he had the ability to connect, was a thoughtful man who was likely to be over-analysing problems, he said. “He shouldn’t try to be anything else other than himself.”

Media trainer Brian Edwards, who has worked with Cunliffe, said the Labour leader was coming across poorly “which is curious because in the past he’s come across very well indeed. He doesn’t look relaxed, he doesn’t look spontaneous, he looks like he is reciting extended sound bites that he has been given by advisers.”

I think Ralston and Edwards both have perceptive comments.

Tags: , ,

57 Responses to “Stuff rates the leaders”

  1. lazza (381 comments) says:

    Some time back I offered Cunners some free advice, The Lord knows why … maybe pity?

    Seems like he was unable/unwilling/incapable … of taking it (see below).

    Advice (unsolicited).

    It has just struck me that your “voice”,that is the Way! you put your case is not helping your chances of success.

    Here follows some adjectives that describe your presentation style-voice.

    You would do well to develop “something different” because you come across as a loser right off.

    Confident winners do not right off the bat convey in the way they speak their tentativeness.

    You have to sound confident, not querelous all the time.

    Here are the adjectives …

    accusative … try neutral
    querelous … relax
    carping … try “I could care less”
    combatative … kiwis do NOT relate to aggressive postures.

    They (the positivity) work for JK … the reason that he is (appears) so laid back. You might try it.

    Vote: Thumb up 8 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  2. hj (6,991 comments) says:

    That’s the message from experts who claim the Labour leader is failing to connect with the voting public because he’s not being true to himself.
    ..
    as I said yesterday, he’s like a diplomate but he is being diplomatic to his own party and hence he is hamstrung. On the one hand you have Iprent and on the other the warts and all individual.

    Vote: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  3. Peter (1,712 comments) says:

    Lanza, I’m not surprised your advice didn’t get traction. It doesn’t make much sense.

    Vote: Thumb up 13 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  4. Hugh Pavletich (217 comments) says:

    The problem runs a lot deeper than Mr Cunliffe and his lack of “authenticity”. It is extremely difficult to be authentic when talking nonsense !

    Bluntly … the Left currently does not have workable solutions to issues … and the better informed wider public is increasingly well aware of that.

    A significant reason for this is because of the rapidly increasing influence of the internet / social media … and the decline of the heritage media, which tended to favour and protect the Left.

    They have the same problems in the United States and the United Kingdom … and likely elsewhere.

    The Left is going nowhere until it changes radically and connects with the public with workable solutions to issues.

    Popular. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 25 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  5. Peter (1,712 comments) says:

    Leaders need to be, above all, consistent. The rock in the storm. Key, Clark and Peters are. Well, Winston is being less consistent in parliament these days, which makes it all the more noticeable.

    Vote: Thumb up 12 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  6. OneTrack (3,088 comments) says:

    “The Left is going nowhere until it changes radically and connects with the public with workable solutions to issues.”

    But they will keep focussing on glasses of milk and what the Caninet manual may or may not say.

    Vote: Thumb up 13 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  7. duggledog (1,554 comments) says:

    As someone pointed out on here a day or two ago, Cunliffe blew it during the Campbell Live story at his home where he went for a Pretend Beer Like Real Blokes with his secret friend John and blurted out ‘Hey I’ve made mistakes but I’m learning fast’ or something to that effect.

    You can’t say that and seriously expect to get a crack at leading the country. Not when things are allegedly going so beautifully for us. A hell of a lot of people would have seen that item and just written him off right there and then. My Mrs couldn’t believe what he was saying but we all liked his wife though.

    This is on top of everything else that the MSM has slyly skirted around like his donations, quals etc that has nevertheless taken root in the lunch rooms around New Zealand. I think John Key will utterly decimate him and Norman in the election debates. I can hardly wait. Great sport. Key’s really on top of his game now, he’s got so much more confidence and articulation that say 5 years ago and ackshully he wasn’t too bad then.

    Vote: Thumb up 15 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  8. hj (6,991 comments) says:

    Hugh Pavletich
    The Left is going nowhere until it changes radically and connects with the public with workable solutions to issues.
    …….
    yes the best advice is brushed aside if it isn’t what liberal elites want to hear.
    Savings Working Group
    http://www.treasury.govt.nz/publications/reviews-consultation/savingsworkinggroup/pdfs/swg-report-jan11.pdf
    Tax Working Group
    http://www.victoria.ac.nz/sacl/centres-and-institutes/cagtr/pdf/tax-report-website.pdf
    Treasury
    http://www.treasury.govt.nz/downloads/pdfs/mi-jarrett-comm.pdf
    http://www.treasury.govt.nz/publications/research-policy/wp/2014/14-10

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 5 You need to be logged in to vote
  9. igm (1,413 comments) says:

    “Tojo” Cunliffe stuffed himself up claiming to have done so many things that were untrue. Telling young labourites about bogus family war records, then texting during a Anzac service, when he is an avowed pacifist coming from conshie stock, shows he is nothing but a charlatan. He has yet to make public his desire to disestablish the RSA movement!

    Vote: Thumb up 16 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  10. hj (6,991 comments) says:

    We need to take the political system apart and redesign it. I was reading about that a while back and one suggestion was answers to question on a form (no posturing, prevaricating or rhetoric). Knowlegeable people could take part in governance for free via their keyboard.
    NZ First gets a lot of stick but I am reminded of myself being signed up for Mutual Funds when I was young and nodding yes, yes when really I didn’t follow what was going on. People lower down need to be indulged with clearer explanation than pilloried by economists living in another world.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  11. 3-coil (1,219 comments) says:

    Cunners suffers from the same problem that afflicts all inveterate liars. He has to hesitate for just a moment before he answers to check “what lie have I used to answer this question in the past?”

    It’s a bitch, and the only way around it is to tell the truth all the time – but he’s too far in now, he has layers of lies upon lies (eg his CV), so he’s stuck with this problem forever.

    Vote: Thumb up 10 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  12. wf (441 comments) says:

    I feel sorry for Cunliffe because he’s in the wrong job. If he didn’t realize it before his elevation, I bet he knows it now.

    Like Shearer before him, he’s probably a nice enough guy, but the pressure of trying to please his union masters completely defeats him. He looks lost.

    All very dispiriting when you are up against someone who seems so surefooted in every situation.

    Vote: Thumb up 10 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  13. hj (6,991 comments) says:

    National is vulnerable on immigration but Cunlife cant bite.

    Overseas, politicians have been pandering to the worst fears and lowest common denominators of their electorates – immigration is one of the most controversial and partisan political issues in the US right now, while any quick trek through the European media will show you the UK, French and German governments all trying to gummage up the free movement of people across the EU (they’ve got eastern Europe in mind, mainly). Some of this recent anti-immigration posturing is the bigger political parties trying to cut off even worse options, and prevent anti-immigration voters defecting to more extreme options (such as France’s National Front). Even allowing for the realpolitik of the whole thing, though, it’s all pretty discreditable.
    So I was quietly chuffed to come across evidence that we, at least, are still open-minded, liberal, and decent people.

    http://economicsnz.blogspot.co.nz/2013/11/an-open-minded-people.html

    The lowest common denominator is the other :

    The social and intellectual elite in France, far from viewing their nation as homogenous, regarded most of their fellow Frenchmen not as ‘one of us’, but as racial alien, and so inferior that they stood below the ‘most inferior savage races’ and were ‘beyond cure’.
    In Victorian England, too, the elite viewed the working class and the rural poor as the racial Other. A vignette of working class life in the Saturday Review, a well-read liberal magazine of the era, is typical of English middle class attitudes:

    http://kenanmalik.wordpress.com/2012/06/04/what-is-wrong-with-multiculturalism-part-1/

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 4 You need to be logged in to vote
  14. hj (6,991 comments) says:

    Hugh Pavletich
    The Left is going nowhere until it changes radically and connects with the public with workable solutions to issues.
    ….
    People need to read the Deomographia report. It is urban planning that causes the housing crisis.
    Left to its self evolution can produce a kidney (but it will have to produce a Houston first).

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 4 You need to be logged in to vote
  15. Jack5 (5,137 comments) says:

    I’m on the right, but thought the relaxed and open Cunliffe revealed on the Campbell TV3 series of leaders in their homes was likable and personable, in contrast with the persona Cunliffe projects in interviews, panels etc.

    Perhaps Cunliffe is being stuffed up by Labour’s spin doctors. I guess there’s little chance of getting help from John Key’s team, who seem to be, at least in part, the team of PR engineers who work with the Red Chinese investment front in NZ.

    Even if Cunliffe could be perceived as well as Key is, however, Cunliffe would still be pressed down by the weight on his back of Labour’s feminists, rainbow coalitionists, and educationists.

    Vote: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  16. big bruv (13,880 comments) says:

    wf

    Unlike Shearer (who I have no doubt is a decent and honest man) Cunliffe is a complete and utter silent t.

    Shearer could have been a decent enough PM, he is a likeable chap and one who did indeed end up in the wrong job. Shearer is far too decent a man to be in the house I suspect.

    Cuntliffe, well he is everything his name suggests.

    Vote: Thumb up 16 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  17. thedavincimode (6,759 comments) says:

    There is no need to over-analyse and over-complicate the issue. The bottom line is that cunners is a wholly unlikeable, bullshitting and vainglorious arse.

    Vote: Thumb up 21 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  18. BeaB (2,123 comments) says:

    Too many small details that add up to a big picture – the CV, the medals, the secret donors, the fish and chip shop, the list goes on. People arent’t fools. When he adopts that big gruff manly voice in Parliament to show his anger and emotion he just looks ridiculous. And all those mixed metaphors!
    That’s not even to mention the problem with saying Key has stolen all your ideas but they are actually crap which is what they were trying to say about the budget.
    Underneath I suspect there is a comfy old country vicar cuddling his cat. And I also think if he ever gets in he will turn out to be the Kiwi Tony Blair.

    Vote: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  19. martinh (1,257 comments) says:

    His fake smile annoys me the worst.
    Oh well i hope he stays in longer, him and the party president are two people i really think are above their pay grade

    Vote: Thumb up 11 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  20. Ed Snack (1,872 comments) says:

    The Leaders in their homes” though will have been totally scripted and edited. About as authentic as a soap opera. Maybe it is just that TV3 employs a better quality of script writers than Labour.

    Vote: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  21. RightNow (6,994 comments) says:

    Cun’liffe is an example of the Peter Principle. He’ll never get “promoted” to PM
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Principle

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  22. Sir Cullen's Sidekick (888 comments) says:

    Folks – what you don’t understand is Cunliffe is keeping his powder dry…..he will be at his best when the proper election campaign starts….Watch out fellows….He will be in belligerent mood and will utter classic one liners like – “you betcha”, “you gotcha”….

    Vote: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  23. hj (6,991 comments) says:

    When Helen Clarke was here she said the biggest issue was “undoubtably” unemployment. She was completely silent on house prices. The UN migration head believes numbers don’t matter:

    The EU should “do its best to undermine” the “homogeneity” of its member states, the UN’s special representative for migration has said.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-18519395

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 3 You need to be logged in to vote
  24. RAS (63 comments) says:

    It’s not the salesman, it’s the product.

    Vote: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  25. Nostalgia-NZ (5,191 comments) says:

    I agree with Jack, from the little I’ve watched, he looks relaxed as though Oravida and time in the job has taken some pressure off him as would be expected. Also that he hasn’t jumped into the Dotcom debate was helpful along with the fact he made it clear he wouldn’t comment on the family situation of others when asked about JK’s daughter this week. I doubt that he will do it, but as the budget was a shift to the left, continuing the marginalising of Labour to the far left, he should do a JK reversing the leftward trend and get back to the middle, hurdling the Nats if necessary. Employment Law and Welfare would be a good start with business at least. If he continues to recognise a Labour past, of which great parts of are no longer relevant, he’ll be run out without facing a ball with JK taking the last batsman’s catch while roaming free in the left field. Not to forget that Labour’s past, Douglas and FTA with China now ‘belong’ to the right.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  26. David Garrett (7,270 comments) says:

    RAS: I agree…The Labour Party is lost in the wilderness…they think they can somehow stand for Waitakere Man AND the LGBT “community” AND those who still think the government running everything is a great idea…the reality is no organization can be that broad a church and simultaneously satisfy all their factions….

    Cunliffe is simply the manifestation of what happens when you try to do that…you need four or five different voices, and four or five quite different personas…

    Vote: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  27. Judith (8,534 comments) says:

    Friday, after the budget, was bound to be trying for all leaders. The media, hungry for something to ‘spectacularise’ seemed to have found it with a group of protesters outside Sky City.

    In my opinion John Key missed a vital opportunity that day.
    On watching the protests on live tv, I asked myself what would some of our great leaders, like Lange have done?

    Key could have scored some big points by doing as other leaders have in the past, and provided time to speak to a delegation of the the protesters, just a couple. All he had to do was provide ten minutes to listen. Even if he didn’t agree, the fact he was prepared to listen and take note of the concerns of some of the electorate, would dis-spell their claims that he ‘just doesn’t care’.

    A wise ‘true’ leader would have done that – would have shut down the ‘doesn’t care’ argument with just ten minutes of his time. He didn’t even have to change anything or change his policy – but just to let them know that he acknowledges their arguments would have been enough. Instead his inaction increased the divide, gave the media and the protesters more to complain about (especially when he then made a joke of their valid protest and concerns) and portrayed the very big picture of a leader that just doesn’t care about ALL NZers.

    If Key wants to be the PM again, with a healthy majority and without Peters on board, he is going to have to start acting like a statesman, and a person fit to lead the whole country – not just those that vote for him.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 15 You need to be logged in to vote
  28. mara (784 comments) says:

    The man is too desperate to be trusted.

    Vote: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  29. Kea (12,777 comments) says:

    My advice to the communist bloc is simple:

    :arrow: Begin to make peace with the fact National will win the election and John Key is your leader. :)

    Vote: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  30. Hugh Pavletich (217 comments) says:

    Hj … Labour needs to START by getting over its hang-ups about the market economy.

    After seeing the Christchurch bureaucrats trying development (Central Blueprint and the rest of the horror story) … I just can’t warm to the idea of Labour unleashing these guys in to housing development / building. Just one problem of many.

    Since you bought up the Annual Demographia Survey, may I respectfully suggest you read closely what Alain Bertaud, former Principal Urban Planner at the World Bank, had to say about the Chinese Communist Party’s attitudes to the market economy …

    http://www.demographia.com/dhi.pdf

    Why is NZ Labour still to the Left of those guys ?

    And since you mentioned Houston … did you know it is a Democrat town ? And too … its current re-elected Mayor Annise Parker is the first openly lesbian Mayor of a major US metro …

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annise_Parker

    Hj … should Labour lose this September election, will you all be emigrating en-masse to Democrat (and wonderfully tolerant) Houston ?

    Get praying in earnest David Farrar !

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 4 You need to be logged in to vote
  31. Simon (719 comments) says:

    Look up Peter principle there is a photo of cunnlife

    It can only get much worse if he gets voted into pm. He is clearly reached his level of incompEtence

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  32. stigie (1,164 comments) says:

    ” A wise ‘true’ leader would have done that”

    Judith…you mean for John Key to step outside of Skycity just to get eggs thrown at him ?

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  33. Judith (8,534 comments) says:

    @ stigie (690 comments) says:
    May 18th, 2014 at 12:06 pm

    No, that is not what I said – he should have asked to see a delegation of a couple of them, to hear what it was they were asking for, and to let them know that he was listening, and at least heard what their complaints were.

    it is an old technique that has worked well for many leaders – let the people feel acknowledged, and even if they don’t get what they want, they feel better knowing at least the people cared enough to listen.

    One of the biggest criticisms of Key is that he doesn’t care about anyone but big business. To be seen to listen to others, would immediately shut that criticism down.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 10 You need to be logged in to vote
  34. holysheet (385 comments) says:

    Cunners suffers from the same problem that afflicts all inveterate liars. He has to hesitate for just a moment before he answers to check “what lie have I used to answer this question in the past?”

    Very well said
    Back in the day when I had a boss my wife said to him
    “You tell so many lies you don’t know when you actually tell the truth”

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  35. NK (1,243 comments) says:

    Funny. I thought Karen Price was the new leader of the Labour Party. The country certainly knows her better than silent “t”.

    Vote: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  36. tvb (4,415 comments) says:

    I would describe Cunliffe as a quantum politician. In a brilliant article Mitt Romney had quantum theory applied to him One could equally apply a similar analysis to Cunliffe. For instance in the same way light can be a wave and a particle, Cunliffe can be both a leftie and a moderate at the SAME time. Likewise all his views can be expressed as probabilities. For instance there is a non zero chance that Cunliffe supports state confiscation of all property. Also with Cunliffe one cannot separate the act of observation from how he feels on an issue. Cunliffe will feel every possible way on an issue until the moment he is asked about it and will give the answer that pleases the questioner the most. Of course there is an anti Cunliffe candidate that will leap into prominence namely Russell Norman who destroys Cunliffe and the Labour Party.

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  37. hmmokrightitis (1,590 comments) says:

    TBH, I think you’re dreaming Judith. None of them were interested in listening. They are happy to hurl abuse and shout slogans, such as what they see as a fact “the war on the poor”. OMFG, really? If you tried to engage them in honest conversation, thats what you would get. Nonsensical bullshit with no basis in fact. Why even bother?

    Vote: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  38. OneTrack (3,088 comments) says:

    “Cunliffe, who at times proved he had the ability to connect, ”

    Like when he was on the top of a bus in Avondale?

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  39. OneTrack (3,088 comments) says:

    Judith – “One of the biggest criticisms of Key is that he doesn’t care about anyone but big business.”

    That may be a criticism of Key in the echo chamber of the Labour and Green Party meetings, and their marketing arms TV1 TV3 news. Meanwhile, out in the real world world of work to be done and taxes to be paid, Key appears little worried about big business and does seem to react to some issues raised by others – the extension of paid parental leave being a recent example.

    Vote: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  40. BeaB (2,123 comments) says:

    Unlike Judith I think John Key over and over again shows he has a heart and a social conscience. Otherwise he and his wife could be enjoying oodles of leisure, travel, golf and home life rather than the hard grind of government and politics.

    He doesn’t need to talk to any rent-a-mob scraped up by the Bradfords and Mintos of this world. He is far more usefully employed talking to the wide variety of New Zealanders he interacts with every day, just about all of whom come away impressed by the man himself regardless of their political views.

    We trust him, like him and appreciate the direction he has taken the country in. I’ll vote for him until he decided to retire, which I sincerely hope won’t be any time soon.

    I also used to like Lange but his oratory and wit unfortunately far outstripped his energy and sticking power. But he isn’t even in the same room as John Key, our only PM so universally admired and liked at home and abroad.

    Call me one-eyed but Key always trumps pseudos like Cunliffe and I believe he is as much the PM for people like me as he is for what Cunliffe sneeringly calls the ‘big end’ of town.

    Vote: Thumb up 13 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  41. Andronicus (219 comments) says:

    Key comes across as a used car salesman. All smiles, white teeth, lovely manner and slick hair. All mouth and trousers.

    Cunliffe is a job in development. Give him time and, maybe, we will see what he is really like. He needs to relax, take it easy, let the real man come out.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 13 You need to be logged in to vote
  42. BeaB (2,123 comments) says:

    Andronicus
    I think we are seeing the real man – one who embroiders the truth, parrots party lines, tailors his message to the crowd, adopts phoney voices, tells lies about his past, comes over as smarmy and untruthful, ambitious and self-seeking.
    I certainly don’t need any more of his ‘real man’ to come out.

    Vote: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  43. Judith (8,534 comments) says:

    @ OneTrack (2,101 comments) says:
    May 18th, 2014 at 1:17 pm

    So you don’t think that with National sitting on 47% in the polls, that what others think of him is not significant?

    I would say it is still terribly significant. Key needs to get as higher vote as possible, in order to limit the number of coalition partners he has. He certainly does not need to have to go to NZ1 unless he has no other option.

    Therefore, whatever other people think of him is valid and is significant. As most people will tell you – there are a degree of the population that will always vote the way they do, and those are fairly evenly divided. It is the swinging vote in the middle that makes or breaks a PM’s dreams. That is the vote that Key needs to capture, and a simple act like being seen to listen to a couple of students, could have gained him a bit more kudos in the swinging vote. He doesn’t have the cash to buy votes, so he has to give the next best thing, his time/ attention / and understanding. Making a joke of the people that are protesting against you, to the people that he is accused of being the only group he gives attention to, is NOT going to help him. No matter how much you’d like to believe it.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 9 You need to be logged in to vote
  44. Reid (16,440 comments) says:

    The bottom line is that cunners is a wholly unlikeable, bullshitting and vainglorious arse.

    What needs to happen is a Campbell Live leaked tape of Matt shouting at him in the war room and then all the other caucus nasties lining up to have a go at him one by one until he’s a blubbering heap on the floor.

    This sympathy tactic won’t help them win but it might stop some of us from enjoying their tremendous loss quite so much when it inevitably happens.

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  45. Peter (1,712 comments) says:

    Judith, Key giving them time would legitimate them.

    Truth is, they are just ranters. The more they squeal, shout and fight, the higher National moves in the polls. Who wants to be associated with such losers?

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  46. Sir Cullen's Sidekick (888 comments) says:

    Andronicus (209 comments) says:
    May 18th, 2014 at 2:08 pm
    Key comes across as a used car salesman. All smiles, white teeth, lovely manner and slick hair. All mouth and trousers.

    Cunliffe is a job in development. Give him time and, maybe, we will see what he is really like. He needs to relax, take it easy, let the real man come out.

    @Andronicus – You gotcha! You betcha!

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  47. OneTrack (3,088 comments) says:

    Andronicus – “Cunliffe is a job in development.”

    How long has the guy been in parliament and how much longer should we wait? Do you think 5 more months will do it? Or maybe he could come back in 2017 and have another try at the PMs job, when he has had more development? Shearer was the only one who could validly claim the inexperience excuse.

    The ABC club warned us. All we are seeing is what they knew all along.

    Vote: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  48. OneTrack (3,088 comments) says:

    reid @2:38 – Maybe a Downfall version, with Matt as the Fuhrer?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  49. OneTrack (3,088 comments) says:

    Judith – “and a simple act like being seen to listen to a couple of students,”

    I didnt know that Sue Bradford and Mayann Street were students?

    Vote: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  50. RF (1,396 comments) says:

    I can remember a few years ago that thumb head used to trot out lines such as … Get back in your box… Be very afraid. When addressing National MPs in the house. I think he used to wear pin stripe suits in those days

    At the time I thought he was either going places or a posing fuck wit. I chose the later and I guess I was right.

    He just does not ring true when he makes his speeches. Deliberate and rehearsed.

    Thank god he is not trusted by 75% of his caucus and will be gone after the election.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  51. Longknives (4,737 comments) says:

    “and a simple act like being seen to listen to a couple of students,”

    Fuck the spotty,whiny little gits..”National doesn’t care about the Arts..” etc etc
    *I did my Tertiary the hard way- Full student loan paid back WITH interest. These pampered little tossers don’t know they’re alive…

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  52. prosper (162 comments) says:

    Cunnliffe trained at a school near Harvard, worked for the Boston Consulting Group, is a multimillionaire, lives in one of NZ most expensive suburbs and is married to a prominent successful lawyer. This is not the path of a socialist. He should begin either Act or National. He is using the Labour party to become PM not because he believes in their policies. That is why he comes across as fake and insincere he simply doesn’t believe what he is saying.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  53. Keeping Stock (10,337 comments) says:

    @ Judith – when protesters outside Key’s post-Budget lunch are screaming out delightful things like “John Key – fuck you”, why should he give them the time of day? There were 60 protesters on Friday out of Auckland’s population of 1.5 million, so they are hardly representative of a huge segment of the population.

    And the protesters wouldn’t care anyway. They were protesting a Budget that gave little to John Key’s “rich prick” mates, but gave plenty to families. I guess when you announce a post-Budget protest before the Budget is delivered you run the risk of looking like an ungrateful, self-interested rent-a-mob.

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  54. Longknives (4,737 comments) says:

    Keeping Stock- They were ‘Professional Protesters’. They don’t even really know/care what they are ‘Protesting’ about…
    On the news I saw a smelly hippy from Greenpeace wanking on about drilling, a posh looking student ranting that “National doesn’t care about the Arts” and a whole lot of the usual smelly dropkicks waving Mana flags and yelling abuse at the Police.
    *Of note is that I recognised multiple familiar faces from the last ‘Rent-a-Mob’ Protest the feral left organised…

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  55. Johnboy (16,483 comments) says:

    But he was the chosen annointed one of the Union movement prosper. How can this be if what you say is true? :)

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  56. prosper (162 comments) says:

    The union thought they had chosen a person similar to Key in that he had international business experience but as they are insincere themselves in pretending to look after the workers they could not detect Cunnliffe,s insincerity. Does that make sense I am on my third wine.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  57. berend (1,708 comments) says:

    Brian Edwards: He doesn’t look relaxed, he doesn’t look spontaneous, he looks like he is reciting extended sound bites that he has been given by advisers.

    But wasn’t that true for the previous 3 leaders as well? From Phil Goff onwards, it was clear they were putting on an act. So I think this points to a deeper problem in Labour.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote