The obesity initiative

Stuff reports:

The Government is preparing to make a major announcement in the fight against , as it looks to reverse a trend of expanding waistlines and the burden of disease that goes with it.

In the next few weeks it’s expected the Government will announce a major package of reform, that could include changes in schools, primary health and a major public campaign targeted at children and parents.

It’s believed this could include changes to how physical education is run in schools, with both Health Minister Jonathan Coleman and Education Minister Hekia Parata understood to be in discussions. …

It’s expected the national package to be announced will not involve any regulatory changes around sugar content and advertising, or taxes on unhealthy foods or drinks.

Good. There is a role in education and information, but it is not the role of Government to decide which foods can and can not be advertised.

Official documents show the Ministry of Health has completed a major stocktake of programmes under both portfolios.

More than $82 million is currently spent across 76 projects. 

How many work?

UPDATE: The Greens of course are demanding the Government regulates food more:

Government plans to tackle the obesity crisis will not make any headway unless there is a crackdown on junk food, the Green Party says.

The Government is preparing to make a major announcement in the fight against obesity, as it looks to reverse a trend of expanding waistlines and the burden of disease that goes with it.

However, it’s expected the national package to be announced will not involve any regulatory changes around sugar content and advertising, or taxes on unhealthy foods or drinks.

Green Party health spokesperson Kevin Hague said reports that there would be no extra regulations on junk food within the reforms meant they were unlikely to make any impact.

Actually regulatory responses like sugar taxes have failed around the world. Not one has reduced obesity. At best they reduce sales of one particular product.

No food or drink is unhealthy in moderation. A can of coke once a month is fine. A bottle a day is not.

It’s about portion size and quantity of food people eat far more than the mix. Again a quarter pounder is fine occasionally, but not fine as your daily breakfast.

These demands for regulations are nanny statists wanting to tell us what we can and can not eat.

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