Poor Prince Charles

November 14th, 2008 at 9:55 am by David Farrar

The Herald reports how much dislikes touring New Zealand:

The Prince wrote to friends at the time that if “one more New Zealand child asks me what it’s like to be a prince, I shall go demented”, the Guardian newspaper reported yesterday.

Charles will become King of New Zealand when the Queen dies. As readers will know, I prefer Republic with a written constitution.

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34 Responses to “Poor Prince Charles”

  1. dime (9,980 comments) says:

    HAHAHA he has a point.

    Dime says keep the Monarchy!

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  2. Rakaia George (313 comments) says:

    I thought he already was demented. I think a republic is definitely the way to go – and I’m talking about GB when I say that!

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  3. Banana Llama (1,043 comments) says:

    That made me lol

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  4. GN (18 comments) says:

    he’s a mad old twat.

    Bring on the Republic of Aotearoa.

    seriously.

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  5. goodgod (1,348 comments) says:

    Oh for fucksake – it’s a 27 year old quote.

    If it means so much, I guess you’ll find John Key’s apathy toward the Boks touring is a real concern afterall…? And every racist remark from the Maori party over the last 5 years should have you condemning a coalition. Here’s a bag of straw. Grasp tightly. :lol:

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  6. big bruv (13,929 comments) says:

    Bugger that, long live the King/Queen.

    Do any of you really want to see the day when we have President Helen Clark or President Winston Peters?

    Anyway, many of us have British heritage, nobody would ever suggest that Maori forget their heritage so why should I have mine forcibly removed from me?

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  7. goodgod (1,348 comments) says:

    Bugger that, long live the King/Queen.

    Do any of you really want to see the day when we have President Helen Clark or President Winston Peters?

    Anyway, many of us have British heritage, nobody would ever suggest that Maori forget their heritage so why should I have mine forcibly removed from me?

    God save our gracious Queen…Long live our noble Queen…God save the Queen:

    Send her victorious…something something something…

    God save the Queen…

    There will be no mercy for you republican upstarts when the war begins!

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  8. Nigel (516 comments) says:

    If things go well, a referendum on a Republic would be a very good thing for the next election. My only concern is the Presidential election, the fear always is if you get HC(2) & the EFA, how much damage could be done if there was even less limit on power.

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  9. Murray (8,847 comments) says:

    We should take out shoot everyone who has ever gotten annoyed with stupid questions from kids shouldn’t we David.

    Your arguments for trying to be like Fiji is as compelling as always. Congratulations, you’re as cutting edge as the Guardian.

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  10. Put it away (2,880 comments) says:

    I don’t particulary care about the monarchy but it’s mainly the left who hate it, so I feel it has to have something going for it

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  11. kiwipolemicist (393 comments) says:

    Some would say that Charles is already demented due to his inbreeding.

    Victoria & Albert were first cousins, as were Albert’s parents. The only fresh blood in the royal family since then is the Queen Mother & Diana.

    http://www.kiwipolemicist.wordpress.com

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  12. Ross Miller (1,704 comments) says:

    Much like the ETS …. we don’t need to be out there leading the charge to save the planet.

    Equally there should be no mad rush to replace the monarchy.

    But the reality is that once our Aussie cousins make the break we will follow as sure as night follows day.

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  13. Rakaia George (313 comments) says:

    How many of you that are pro-monarchy ever paid for their lifestyle out of your taxes? I did for too many years, which is why I am in favour of a republic. It’s just a shame we can’t chop their heads off these days.

    Can’t I be a nasty right-winger anymore if I’m an atheist republican?

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  14. grumpyoldhori (2,362 comments) says:

    Bollocks, HM’s loyal company of wood choppers will shorten up a few of you misguided Republican types.
    You want some ex MP as President, because that is what you will get , think Key or Goff want a President elected by the people ?

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  15. dimmocrazy (286 comments) says:

    Looks like none of you guys actually read what DPF was saying “republic AND written constitution”.
    The crux is of course in the second, and there is no way to organize that properly in the constitutional and political quagmire this country finds itself. Add to that the fact that NZ is simply too small and parochial, and the only reasonable conclusion should be that New Zealand must cease to exist as a sovereign state, and be included in a larger federal system of some sort. The question of course being what federal system. The US would be nice, particularly in combination with some pan-pacific constellation, but that is perhaps too far-fetched. Australia is a more likely contender, culturally more logical and with the advantage that there are already a large percentage of NZ-ers living there, short geographical distance etc. The problem with connecting up to Australia is probably more emotional than anything else. The economic advantages of such a move would be dramatic. In the longer term such a combination could annex to a Pacific-Asian constellation.

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  16. Sam (502 comments) says:

    I’m on the fence here, so, when the revolution comes I’ll just opt for the opposite side of my brother…

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  17. David in Chch (519 comments) says:

    I think we can still retain a constitutional monarchy. BUT let’s make it OUR monarch. How about the Maori king or queen for constitutional monarch? It actually takes care of a lot of problems with presidential elections for what is supposed to be a largely ceremonial role.

    That said, whatever change occurs MUST happen within the context of an overall constitution, and preferrably some sort of constitutional conference.

    Until then, if it ain’t broke … (well, not much at least :-)

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  18. baxter (893 comments) says:

    I’m surprised David that you didn’t report that Kiri TeKanawa won the contest held by the Republican Society to be the first President of our Republic. There were five finalists and 3000 votes and she won by 1,300…
    …………..As for Prince Charles I have no strong thoughts but I don’t think he should be held in perpetual contempt for the comment he made as a result of his visit here with the then Lady Di. She was the centre of attention not he.

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  19. Sam (502 comments) says:

    That Dame Kiri won the online poll is as good as any reason not to have a popularly elected president as head of state.

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  20. Zippy Gonzales (485 comments) says:

    Pity the kids didn’t ask him “Why are you prince?” I don’t think divine rule cuts any mustard these days.

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  21. Murray (8,847 comments) says:

    Dame Kiri? Where does she live again and for how long now?

    And what passport does she travel on.

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  22. NeillR (351 comments) says:

    if “one more New Zealand child asks me what it’s like to be a prince, I shall go demented”
    Surely it’s immediately obvious that one more child did ask him…….. freaking wingnut.

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  23. Murray (8,847 comments) says:

    Yes he has big ears, clearly unfit to have an opinion.

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  24. Stuart Mackey (337 comments) says:

    Monarchy or Republic? With our constitutional arraignments the question is almost pointless, people in this country are so ill informed on matters constitutional, that any charismatic scoundrels in government could set up such a system as to have their way with the nation and strip our hard won rights to the point of serfdom.

    Until such matters as Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Assembly and of Association, Freedom of, and from, Religion and those others that a nation cannot be considered free without, are beyond the grasp and manipulation of politicians and lobbyists, Bills and laws subject to the veto of those rights, abandonment of such vestigial protections of our rights and liberties as are still retained, must be resisted at all costs, and such distractions as to the nature of our head of state be the furthermost thing from our minds.

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  25. bruno 32 (22 comments) says:

    A better question at the time would have been “Why can’t you squeeze toothpaste onto your own toothbrush and not let that funny man do everything for you ? ” “Does he wipe your arse too ? “

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  26. Chthoniid (2,047 comments) says:

    I prefer constitutional monarchy. A lot of such countries have been quite stable and successful states (Denmark, Netherlands, Japan, UK etc)

    Republics with written constitutions aren’t necessarily more stable- a lot of Latin America has proven that.

    Nonetheless, there are a couple of other points in favour of constitutional monarchy.
    We get a head-of-state that doesn’t feel like they need to do anything overtly political, like presidents often feel the need to do.

    We often end up with a good idea of what the monarch will be like, whereas presidents seem to get buy on fooling large numbers of the voting-population.

    We also get a head-of-state that lives 20,000km away instead of here. There are a lot of people who envy us that particular arrangement. They have their head-of-state living in the same country. We get to keep ours 20,000km away.

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  27. mavxp (483 comments) says:

    Just to clarify:

    It does *not* follow that needing a more robust constitution enshrining our freedoms requires that we must become a republic.

    It also does not follow that needing a more robust constitution enshrining our freedoms requires that we join the US or Australia. Although as these countries already have such documentation in place it would make the transition a lot simpler, and less likely to have the scrum screwed by whatever untrustworthy New Zealanders have their hands on the levers of power at the time.

    Of the above potential solutions, I favour joining Australia.

    If she becomes a republic in due course (along with us in it), then so be it.

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  28. Mr Dennis (348 comments) says:

    I favour the monarchy, primarily because I wouldn’t trust any constitution written by our current crop of politicians.

    The system we have works. It is concerning however the constitutional changes that Labour has made. They have been slowly cutting ties with Britain, but not moving in the direction of a republic with a president, rather in the direction of a communist state with the Party in absolute charge. This is extremely worrying, and why I’d rather stick with the current arrangements.
    http://sjdennis.wordpress.com/2008/08/30/constitutional-change-by-labour/

    We could tweak the current system a little however:
    – Make the list of people the Queen picks the Governor-General from have to be jointly agreed to by both the PM and the Leader of the Opposition – to hopefully get more apolitical appointments.
    – Make it clear that the GG is expected to not give the Royal Assent to anything that appears to be against the will of much of the public, and that they have the option of putting it to a referendum. At present the GG just signs everything they are handed so don’t really do much good for the country.

    There will be a public debate on this whenever the Queen dies. We will most likely have a referendum. And I am very concerned about what the Left may manage to propose, and convince the majority of the population (who are uninterested in politics and have never given the serious issues at stake much thought) to vote for.

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  29. pushmepullu (686 comments) says:

    - Make the list of people the Queen picks the Governor-General from have to be jointly agreed to by both the PM and the Leader of the Opposition – to hopefully get more apolitical appointments.

    WTF? The Queen doesn’t pick the Governor General from a list. She plays no role in the process beyond an abstract one. The Governor General is chosen by Cabinet.

    That was a problem under Labour, but under National it will be fine. Although I suggest firing the corrupt Satnayand and replacing him with a good National party figure who understands the need for consensus.

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  30. Mr Dennis (348 comments) says:

    My mistake. If the GG is entirely selected by Cabinet, that is even worse. What other country allows the executive branch of government to be elected by the legislative branch? It pretty much takes away the point of having both branches of government.

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  31. Jack5 (5,137 comments) says:

    How would you set up a New Zealand republic AND keep the Waitangi Treaty?

    And if you abolish our figurehead royalty what about the Maori King? And where is he going to fit in the written constitution?

    We have a great set-up now. It’s a de facto republic, with a nominal sovereign as far away as is possible without space travel, and who has virtually no political power in NZ. Even the sovereign’s representative is appointed by NZ politicians. We get someone’s head to put on the stamps and coins, and for practically no financial outlay. It gives the celebrity magazines for the airhead market something else to focus on apart from the TV presenters and sports people of our own country.

    At the same time we avoid another layer of bureaucracy and drones entailed in a presidential system that would only inflate Wellington’s sense that it is the centre of the Milky Way Galaxy. A republic would also give us as state leader either some pompous twit like Bolger or a poseur like Clark, or perhaps it would cycle through non-white minorities until the last Chatham Islander with a trace of Moriori blood got a go.

    If the system ain’t broke, don’t try to fix it!

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  32. Ratbiter (1,265 comments) says:

    It’s not Prince Charles’ fault our children have been dumbed-down by inane children’s TV and their piss-weak, pleading parents, to the point where they can’t think of any more relevant a question to ask than “what’s it like to be a Prince?”

    OTOH, it definitely IS his fault that he can’t think of a suitably enlightening answer for them. He should be a handy raconteur by now, he’s had enough practice giving speeches! Charlie Boy and his gaffes have done more than anything else to turn people off the monarchy over the years. When he gets his turn the best thing he could do would be to abdicate in favour of Prince William, who would be far more popular.

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  33. Ratbiter (1,265 comments) says:

    PS: The idea that our ancestors came to these islands by a long and dangerous voyage over the sea is an integral part of the heritage shared by most New Zealanders. Having a distant Head of State who continues to be a direct reference to this heritage in this day and age gives a sort of spiritual quality to the country’s constitutional matters, which is irreplaceable.

    President Joe Blogs may be able to convey a similar gravitas in a country the size of the USA, but (s)he would not be able to do so here.

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  34. Jack5 (5,137 comments) says:

    Calls for a republic are nearly always tied up with calls for a written constitution.

    Yet look at the crap and inane bureaucracy (and bureaucrats) that Geoffrey Palmer’s laws have already created.

    For richness, wisdom, flexibility, and its cultural relevance to New Zealand you can’t go past the British system of an unwritten constitution.

    What the written-constitution proponents will next say is that this is no longer sufficient for our new multicultural society. They won’t dare suggest of course that we import into a new constitution things like the feudal privileges of Samoan or Tongan priestly castes, or Beijing’s communist legal system.

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