More on MMP review

April 11th, 2012 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

I blogged yesterday the positions of the political parties on the review. I’ve amended it for United Future as I had overlooked that they are the one party which supported open lists. Their submission said all list candidates should have to stand in an electorate, and they be ranked in descending order of the percentage of party votes in that electorate their party got. That encourages them to campaign for party votes then. Not a totally bad idea, but you wouldn’t want to be the Labour candidate in Helensville or National candidate in Mangere!

I should also make clear that you can still make written submissions to the review until 31 May 2012. The headline last week was for those who wish to also do oral submissions. These oral submission hearings will start in Wellington on Monday 23 April.

Also the Maori Party submission has now been published. They have some interesting proposals:

  • That those of Maori decent be automatically enrolled on the Maori roll, with an option to transfer to the general roll. At present Maori choose when they enrol, rather than have to opt out.
  • Lower the party vote threshold (they do not specify to what) as no Maori party has ever gained 5%
  • Keep the one electorate seat threshold
  • That like the general seats, no Maori seat can be split between the North and South Islands (Te Tai Tonga includes all of the South Island and parts of Wellington)
  • To include tribal information in the electoral roll

As far as I know, the Mana Party have not yet put in a submission.

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9 Responses to “More on MMP review”

  1. Nichlemn (63 comments) says:

    UF’s list idea seems like a way to implement several of the bad aspects of FPP with few counterveiling benefits. It’d ensure reduced geographic diversity, as for instance you’d get a lot of Green MPs in Wellington and proportionally fewer elsewhere. The incentives to compete for the party vote would not be that strong, instead the real battle would to get selected for strong seats, as is the case under FPP.

    The Maori Party’s “opt out” proposal highlights one of the dangers of “libertarian paternalism”. It doesn’t appear to reduce choice, but I can think of no good rationale for it other than the Maori Party’s self-interest. Imagine if National proposed a law that all votes for automatically for National unless you chose to “opt out”.

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  2. peteremcc (342 comments) says:

    Or more realistically, if we automatically put everyone on the general role, unless they explicitly asked to be on the Maori roll (instead of just a straight choice as it is at the moment).

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  3. david (2,565 comments) says:

    How on earth would “they” determine that someone had Maori ancestry? A DNA test?, a judgement based on appearance?, their name? Correct me if I’m wrong but is it not currently possible for a 100%European (or Zimbabwean African for that matter) to enrol on the Maori Roll as there is no requirement to prove ethnicity. Looks a bit like the Maori Party wants to do a bit of ethnic cleansing of the Rolls – I would have thought that was more John Hatfield’s space.

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  4. Sonny Blount (1,848 comments) says:

    Hooray for United Future.

    The only party to offer an alternative view on the party lists.

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  5. Sonny Blount (1,848 comments) says:

    Nichlemn (52) Says:
    April 11th, 2012 at 1:16 pm
    UF’s list idea seems like a way to implement several of the bad aspects of FPP with few counterveiling benefits. It’d ensure reduced geographic diversity, as for instance you’d get a lot of Green MPs in Wellington and proportionally fewer elsewhere. The incentives to compete for the party vote would not be that strong, instead the real battle would to get selected for strong seats, as is the case under FPP.

    Whereas the current MMP situation is to make the electorate races irrelevant and to concede even more power to the parties via their list rankings.

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  6. Graeme Edgeler (3,279 comments) says:

    How on earth would “they” determine that someone had Maori ancestry? A DNA test?, a judgement based on appearance?, their name?

    They don’t. If you claim Maori ancestry they will accept that.

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  7. Graeme Edgeler (3,279 comments) says:

    There are several problems with NZF’s proposal.

    One is that one of the advantages of MMP is that we can support a party even if we don’t like their local candidate.

    Another is that people voting for a party will have no idea what they are voting for.

    And the main one is that this is as open to manipulation as many of the other things currently in MMP.

    If we want voter control of lists, then we should have that: open lists where I get to choose list candidates directly, or where there are primaries.

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  8. Mr Nobody NZ (397 comments) says:

    “They don’t. If you claim Maori ancestry they will accept that”

    Until there is a more advance methodology put in place beyond simply claiming or feeling that you’r Maori, the roll is in my opinion worthless and we might as well simply reverse the approach and transfer all voters onto the Maori Roll and let those who would prefer to opt out onto the general roll.

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  9. emmess (1,416 comments) says:

    I’d like to go further
    How about no Maori seat can be split between the North, South and Stewart Islands?
    There are 20 Maori people (total guess) on Stewart Island so to keep the Maori seat of roughly the same size there will need to be 35,000 Maori seats.

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