Occupation Outlook

February 13th, 2013 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

A useful publication, listing 40 common occupations and showing three dials indicating likely future income, size of fees and job prospects.

The settings are low, medium and high for income and fees and for job prospects are limited, fair and good.

As far as I can see the only occupation with low fees and high income is real estate salespeople. However they have limited job prospects.

Fees, even high ones, tend to be insignificant compared to future income so the two  factors I would look for are high income and good job prospects. Those occupations are:

  • Accountants
  • Financial Advisors
  • Engineers
  • Vets
  • Dentists
  • Doctors
  • Psychologists

Of course more important (for me anyway) is whether you find an occupation interesting and challenging.

They have career sheets on each occupation, such as this one for journalists. Some interestings stats such as average income is $56,000 and 87% of journalists work in print media, and 80% of those work for APN or Fairfax.

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11 Responses to “Occupation Outlook”

  1. dime (9,869 comments) says:

    56k for the arrogant knowitall lefties. lucky them.

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  2. Harriet (4,857 comments) says:

    Looks like the prospects of any job related to being ‘a general dogs body in the snifle service’ – is low in demand!

    Cool…..small government…..as the current pricks might realise they have no future with a continous low income, low career potential and will soon fuck off! :cool:

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  3. krazykiwi (9,186 comments) says:

    My kids have almost completed their uni education – both doing double degrees, and both in fields where there is reasonable or better demand, and reasonable or better pay.

    Like so many of their peers they received advice about following their dreams, getting qualifications in things that really interested them. Mrs kk and I injected a bit of reality along the lines of also considering study debt incurred in light of likely job prospects and income.

    Quite a few of their friends didn’t get this advice, and simply studied what interested them. Social work, jazz ballet, travel, environmental science. Most of these young people are putting on a brave, if disillusioned face, being either unemployed or working in jobs that require no formal qualifications. And they have a pile of student debt.

    There’s a difference between a hobbie and a vocation. Telling a generation of kids otherwise has led to quite a bit of heartache.

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  4. Weihana (4,496 comments) says:

    krazykiwi (8,763) Says:
    February 13th, 2013 at 1:48 pm

    …being either unemployed or working in jobs that require no formal qualifications. And they have a pile of student debt.

    I bet that “pile of debt” is not that bad and can be significantly reduced if they do not draw too heavily on living expenses. Sure medical student, pilot etc. your debt is large but in the long run your income will likely justify it. Most courses aren’t that expensive, and while I’m all for “a bit of reality” I don’t see the point in dedicating your life to something you haven’t a passion for.

    Plenty of people are unemployed because they are overly picky about the jobs they’re prepared to do. Also I’m skeptical that many of these courses are truly their “dreams”. People who do follow their dreams tend to get ahead whatever the obstacles. If there’s not that many job opportunities they’ll make it work. Of course reality has to play a part. If you’re built like a rugby player maybe ballet isn’t for you, or if you can’t stand the sight of numbers then maybe environmental science (or any science) is not for you.

    People need a healthy balance of reality and passion. Money is important but it’s not the be all and end all. It’s a means to an end and that ultimate end is your own happiness. No point working in a well paying but mind-numbingly boring job. You’re going to spend a lot of your time doing this activity so if it’s boring to study, it isn’t going to get better.

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  5. Tauhei Notts (1,693 comments) says:

    I was surprised to see Psychologists amongst that lot that will be in demand.
    Then, I thought, a nation that has so many Green Party supporters would probably need lots of psychological help.

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  6. wreck1080 (3,885 comments) says:

    I wonder how IT salaries were listed as rather low?

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  7. krazykiwi (9,186 comments) says:

    Weihana –

    Also I’m skeptical that many of these courses are truly their “dreams”.

    You can be a skeptical as you like, but despite your soaring intellect you almost certainly know none of the people I am referring to.

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  8. Weihana (4,496 comments) says:

    krazykiwi,

    I wasn’t intending to refer to your anecdote specifically, simply suggesting that the types of courses you list might not be full entirely of people who are following a dream and instead are merely somewhat interested.

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  9. tristanb (1,127 comments) says:

    Anyone else notice that the average salaries were different for different professions? When is the National Party going to address this imbalance? NZ is meant to be an egalitarian society!

    And not only that, there is not equal demand for all jobs! Surely the government could create jobs to cater for all those who’d like to become a photographer or actor. (And no the millions of government money going into NZ on Air isn’t enough.)

    I am also disappointed that Welfare was not represented in the 40 occupations. This is a lucrative career, and looking at the political landscape in NZ, likely to have great job security and growth potential. By excluding it from the list, they have created inequality and prejudice. I will let Sue Bradford know, and we may bring this to the Human Rights Committee.

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  10. OECD rank 22 kiwi (2,746 comments) says:

    Forensic Scientist it is then because CSI is cool.

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  11. MrEd (1 comment) says:

    I find it interesting you left off IT, a field which is incredibly lucrative, has an ever increasing demand for jobs, and also opens up the choice of self employment in many situations (Especially developers).

    If there is one field young people should be gravitating to, it’s IT, I graduated with a great group of people, all of which were instantly snapped up by local firms (even though we live in a small-ish town).

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