Transmission Gully is go this year – if the Government does not change

July 30th, 2014 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

Construction of the motorway north of Wellington has finally been given the green light, and its true cost has finally been revealed.

The Government today inked a public-private partnership deal that will see the first sod turned later this year, almost a century after the project was first mooted.

While resource consent was granted back in 2012, the motorway’s fate was not assured until a contract had been hashed out with the Australian-led consortium that will build it.

Today’s deal means taxpayers finally know how much the 27-kilometre four-lane link between Linden, south of Porirua, and McKays Crossing, north of Paekakariki, will cost them.

Construction works out to be $850 million in today’s dollars, which is $25m less than it would have cost if the transport agency built the motorway.

Excellent.

The New Zealand Transport Agency says Transmission Gully will save motorists 7.3 minutes heading south and 6.3 minutes heading north during periods of heavy congestion.

The road is also a key component of the Government’s $2.6 billion project to build a 110km four-lane expressway between Levin and Wellington Airport, which will slash about 40 minutes off that journey during the morning peak.

That is huge.

But they have not said when the first sod is turned. If actual construction has not started by 20 September, my fear is that the Greens will demand the road be scrapped as price for coalition with Labour, if there is a change of Government.

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59 Responses to “Transmission Gully is go this year – if the Government does not change”

  1. oldpark (265 comments) says:

    Would be good to hear from the Australian Communist Russel Norman from the 10% non electoral list party potential NZ economy wreckers” greens”hE Would confirm your suspicions.According to their American Import from Boston a woman named Genter wants to ban Transmission Gully plus Aucklands so called holiday highay to Whangarei…

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  2. Judith (8,534 comments) says:

    So vote National or lose transmission gully…

    Do we have a percentage of the risk involved – an empirical evaluation based on factual evidence that this is likely to be the outcome, or is it more political scaremongering from a party that has nothing positive to offer, so is intent on winning an election solely by highlighting their illusions of the negative aspects of the opposition?

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  3. Manolo (13,517 comments) says:

    Carts and oxen on dirt roads forever, shouts the communist Norman. His Luddite muppets agree.

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  4. oldpark (265 comments) says:

    A Wellington radio station Newstalk ZB rang Norman the potential NZ economy wrecker if elected,and asked his views on Transmission Gully.He hung up on the RADIO STATION,what an indictment of such an imported pest.

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  5. mjw (391 comments) says:

    Or worse, if National is relying on the Conservatives they may demand a binding referendum on it before it proceeds.

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  6. RRM (9,784 comments) says:

    I like how their animation shows the initial climb through the cutting south of MacKay’s crossing full of fuckers sitting in the right lane for no reason whatsoever. They’ve accurately modelled real Wellington traffic conditions. :-)

    Vote National or the forces of Oppose Everything Do Nothing will ensure it never happens!

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  7. campit (467 comments) says:

    The claim that it works out to be $850m in today’s money is absolute sophistry. Will there be any comment from ACT or the Taxpayers Union on the absolute rort where taxpayers will pay $125m per year from the next 25 years?

    “The Government needs to come clean. In fact, the cost is $125 million per year for 25 years, so the total cost is over $3.13 billion for 27 kilometres, which works out at over $115 million per kilometre.”
    “NZTA says the contract cost $25 million less than it would cost through conventional means, but it spent over $30 million just on the contracting process.

    “The PPP is not a way of saving money, it is a way of hiding an expensive loan using the private sector.

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  8. Ross Miller (1,686 comments) says:

    Judith … thank you for your advice that Labour and the Greens in a policy flip flop now support Transmission Gully.

    Take it you’re going to let that nice Mr Cunliffe and Wussel and the Gucci Sheila know too?

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  9. Brian Marshall (201 comments) says:

    Really Judith? I see building the road that has been proposed 98 years ago as positive.
    Are you actually paid to come on to Kiwiblog to argue the left-wing or counter argument? I see your negative posts all the time and wonder how you can keep coming back when most of your comments are shot down quite convincingly?

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  10. tvb (4,326 comments) says:

    Roading is a good wedge issue between national and labour. But 5 minutes at peak does not sound like much. Is that figure correct.

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  11. peterwn (3,239 comments) says:

    Judith – Labour has said it will ‘indefinitely postpone’ (ie scrap) the so-called ‘Holiday Highway’, but interestingly Labour has not had the balls to say where it stands on Transmission Gully – so it is definitely a negotiating point for coalition talks. Labour is also unlikely to have the strength to stare down the Greens, even while Helen Clark never gave the Greens any portfolios, this was at the cost of ‘respecting’ Green policies and attitudes.

    I doubt the act of turning the first sod would ‘seal’ the project – it would be more like how much it would cost the Government to unwind the PPP, which might be quite small.

    The first sod was turned on the ‘Nelson Railway’ in 1960, but this did not prevent the project being scrapped the following year upon a change of government.

    And a message to Redbaiter and others criticising National for not adhering to so-called ‘founding principles’. Do you really want a Labour led government? If not then stop knocking National in the run-up to the election, then set about to work constructively to achieve your objectives – assuming mainstream NZ has an appetite for them.

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  12. Yogibear (361 comments) says:

    Labour under Goff (and I think Shearer) had a very consistent position on PPPs – namely that they would honour a signed contract.

    That signing happened yesterday.

    Time for Cunliffe to reconfirm that position.

    If he can do that, who gives a shit what Norman thinks.

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  13. chris (634 comments) says:

    We must surely be the only western country in the world that doesn’t have a safe motorway system connecting our major cities. Instead of this piecemeal approach (Transmission Gully, Puhoi to Warkworth/Wellsford, etc) there should be a comprehensive plan to create a modern highway from e.g. Whangarei to Wellington. Then implement over x years, where x might be 20, 30, 40, but at least a proper plan.

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  14. Cunningham (837 comments) says:

    “my fear is that the Greens will demand the road be scrapped as price for coalition with Labour, if there is a change of Government.”

    I don’t think there is any doubt whatsoever that this will happen.

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  15. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    I don’t suppose that the benefit-cost ratio for this behemoth has magically come out above 1.0 yet, has it?

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  16. Yogibear (361 comments) says:

    Nice dodge there CAMPIT – I see your Greens quote selectively used kilometers rather than meters, which is often the way to describe the cost of yours and the Greens beloved CRL.

    So just to be consistent, the CRL is $1 million a metre and using your whole of life TG figures, that road works out to $115k per metre.

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  17. RRM (9,784 comments) says:

    Chris –

    I haven’t been up the line for a couple of years but I noticed they’ve got rid of the old zig-zag and level crossing at Ohingaiti and put in a flyover that you don’t even need to slow down for.

    The great majority of SH1 is perfectly adequate for what it actually needs to accomplish. The worst little bits of it appear to be gradually getting ironed out. But it all takes time and costs money!

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  18. Judith (8,534 comments) says:

    @ peterwn (3,162 comments) says:
    July 30th, 2014 at 9:29 am

    My comments had nothing to do with supporting Labour – I will most certainly not be voting for labour – but rather about the constant and persistent shit slinging and innuendo being promoted, such as this thread.

    It is nothing but innuendo – there is NO factual evidence that Labour will scrap the works – they might review it – but nothing that says the will scrap anything. Labour are fully aware that some sort of solution has to be found.

    Personally I wish we had let the americans construct it when they wanted to during the war years, it was extremely foolhardy not to let them, but such is the value of being able to gaze backwards.

    I will not support a National government led by John Key – that is my bottom line, despite believing that a full National government, not a coalition would be the better of what is on option at the moment.

    I was during the last week softening to the idea of swallowing my pride and perhaps supporting National – until I listened to Key’s speech regarding the Centenary of WWI yesterday. I cannot express here just how disgusted I was. Key, who had been animated, and emotionally active during the proceeding debates, read his speech as if he was reading from a car manual. He had clearly never pre-read it, stumbled over the words, at times looked totally bored, and any meaningful expression of what he was saying was completely absent. He did my grandfather a great injustice. His performance was made worse by the fact that every subsequent speaker, spoke from their heart. It struck me how this is a man who has strong feelings about his own agenda, which was demonstrated by his previous animation, but has little feeling for this country and especially for its history. The contrast was incredible. He will NEVER get my support.

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  19. chris (634 comments) says:

    @RRM true, it’s certainly a lot better than it used to be, and to be fair I thought the roads up north of Auckland weren’t actually too bad when we took a trip up there in the school holidays. But there’s far too much two lane highway with opposing traffic just a couple of metres apart. And yes, I know it costs a heap of cash to build. Roading is so expensive.

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  20. Brian Smaller (4,007 comments) says:

    As someone who drives from Mangamahu to Wellington and back every week, I cannot wait for Transmission Gully to be completed. My trip from the farm to the Hutt is 210km. I usually take a shade under three hours (including a pit stop for a coffee and to gas up the car). That is an average speed of 70kph. Some of the trip is on windy country back roads. When you consider the fact that SH1 has 50, 60, 70, 80 and 100kph zones, multiple traffic lights and roundabouts that cause your spot speed to drop to 0kph at times then that is not too bad an average speed. The TG route will allow me to keep to a steady speed for longer which will result in lower fuel costs. Every time you have to brake or slow down and speed up again you are wasting gas.

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  21. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    ‘Roading is so expensive’
    All the more reason to ensure that we only invest these huge sums in projects that actually make economic sense.

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  22. Yogibear (361 comments) says:

    …… Judith, quite by accident, you have hit on the key question of most infrastructure in NZ.

    “Will we need it sooner or later”?

    It frustrates the hell out of me that most of the shit slinging that goes on is the endless relitigating on whether we need it, not just moving to the “when” question once project viability is clearly established.

    CRL is a classic example of this. Even Gerry Brownlee, who doesn’t seem disposed to commuter rail agrees it is a good project but questions the timing.

    The point of this is the “if” debate is primarily an economic one, whereas the “when” debate still has economic elements, but moves very quickly into optimal financing structures.

    The failure of our politicians to grasp and lead this debate leads to stupid comments like we see from the Greens about the TG deal structure.

    The fundamental point about PPPs is they have to pass a value for money test. They have to BEAT a public sector comparator – namely the cost to the public sector comparing like with like (especially whole of life costs and risk) from undertaking the same project.

    TG clearly did that based on the information to hand.

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  23. MarkF (100 comments) says:

    Chris and RRM I agree, I have been saying for years we need a 20, 30 40yr plan to 4 lane Whangarei to Wellington at least. I could also make a case for Christchurch to Dunedin, spur from Hamilton to Tauranga.

    RRM yes you are right some of the worst parts are getting sorted but there is still an awful lot that aren’t. The northern end of the Desert road and Brnderwyn for example both seriously need work. The idea of a long term plan would bring some sort of certainty to companies involved in the process and not the very piecemeal, stop/start method used today. Puhoi to Warkworth now “underway” the planning and engineering for Warkworth to Wellsford should now be well underway etc.

    Also we have a large tunnel boring machine in Auckland now (Alice) maybe at the end of that contract it could possibly be converted to cut a tunnel through, say, the Rimatukas, that would be a huge improvement over the often snowbound goat track that is there now. If not the Rimutukas then maybe Brnderwyn which is an even worse goat track and as we saw last week very easily prone to damage and thereby cutting off Northland or through the Kaimais all of these would save much time and money and therefore fuel (the Greenies should be pleased)

    Just some forward thinking and good long term plans would be fabulous. But then we get politicians involved and it all goes to hell in a handcart.

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  24. Rich Prick (1,666 comments) says:

    Judith, we don’t really give a rat’s arse what you do with your vote. “at times looked totally bored”, well go join Billingsley in the queue for an apology then. It might be a long wait though.

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  25. rangitoto (239 comments) says:

    So I take it Miken wont be travelling on that road when it’s completed.

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  26. campit (467 comments) says:

    Bugger me, 10 thumbs down for pointing out that taxpayers and future taxpayers are paying billions more than they have to for this road. Tax and spend all good then? If only there was a union of taxpayers that ensured our money was being wisely spent.

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  27. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Like if I had a student loan I would insist on paying interest on it because I don’t support interest-free student loans?

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  28. rangitoto (239 comments) says:

    Don’t take out the loan in the first place.

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  29. Huevon (217 comments) says:

    Let’s build this mofo!!!

    Notice there is no interchange into the back of Porirua…no shortcut into Welly to rob us, eh??

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  30. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    ‘cut a tunnel through, say, the Rimatukas, that would be a huge improvement over the often snowbound goat track that is there now’
    The option was there to build a road tunnel after the rail one was completed in the 1950s, but it was prohibitively expensive. The last time a tunnel option was considered was in the 1980s, I think, and it didn’t stack up against the option of improving the existing road. A huge amount of work has gone into the road in the past 20 years. A tunnel would be an enormous waste of money – it would probably be even less cost-effective than Transmission Gully.

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  31. Yogibear (361 comments) says:

    Campit

    You got a thumbs down from me because you are either ignorant or willfully misleading by quoting the Greens spin on this.

    Len Brown wants to borrow for the CRL – do a like for like comparison on both a public debt-financed procurement and PPP procurement for that project and explain to me why CRL is a good financial (I’m not talking BCRs here) investment from your perspective and TG is bad.

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  32. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    ‘If only there was a union of taxpayers that ensured our money was being wisely spent’
    There is, but they are a bit busy at the moment with the scandal over the Ministry of Health using taxis instead of walking.

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  33. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    ‘explain to me why CRL is a good financial (I’m not talking BCRs here) investment’
    You don’t believe that BCRs are a good way to compare projects?

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  34. RRM (9,784 comments) says:

    As always – I’ll believe it is happening when I see a main earthworks contractor mobilised on site, and truck loads of dirt start coming out.

    Not a moment before.

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  35. ShawnLH (4,482 comments) says:

    “And a message to Redbaiter and others criticising National for not adhering to so-called ‘founding principles’. Do you really want a Labour led government? ”

    Red does not believe in winning elections. Doing so means you have lost your ideological purity and sold out.

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  36. campit (467 comments) says:

    @Yogiebear

    There’s nothing misleading about it. This is a rort. Taxpayers are paying way more than they have to. NZTA haven’t revealed the cost of the project if it was done through traditional contracting methods.

    No funding has been announced for the CRL. AT are still working through the business case and an updated Cost Benefit Analysis, as they should.

    The point I’m making is the taxpayer is being shafted. It wouldn’t be so bad if the private partner was taking any risk, but they aren’t. In the event that the private partner collapses 20 years from now (as has been the case in Sydney and Brisbane), the Govt will inevitably have to pick up the tab. Same if an earthquake damages the motorway. So why bother with a PPP?

    Cognative dissonance alive and well here on Kiwiblog.

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  37. RRM (9,784 comments) says:

    All the more reason to ensure that we only invest these huge sums in projects that actually make economic sense.

    Mikenmild –

    I’d wager almost NOTHING makes less economic sense than leaving tens of thousands of willing and able-bodied people sitting in a huge tailback on the motorway twice a day. Or even just once a day.

    Look at people’s chargeout rates. Look at people’s salaries and wages. Multiply by tens of thousands of people stuck in the queue. Instead of making money to pay their mortgages and make the world go round, or instead of being at home doing their washing and playing with their children, they are grinding along a 100km/h highway at 13km/h and achieving nothing.

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  38. MarkF (100 comments) says:

    Mikenmild. Did we already have a large expensive tunneling machine in the country in the 50s or 80s? What was the traffic volume then? I don’t know the cost implications but has anybody even looked and as I said before no ongoing long term plan / vision as where to go to.

    Wellington is an extremely good example for improved access as it is completely land bound it cannot expand anywhere. In fact (and this will generate some controversy) I would go so as to say that if you started from scratch today Wellington is probably one of the silliest places to attempt to build a city, the topography just screams no! Wellingtonians don’t take offence, I actually like Wellington but from a purely practical point of view it is a dog.

    That being said Wellington exists and it ain’t going away so we need to make sure transport routes are made as good as possible. The Rimutukas are a good example, yes Mike they have been improved, on the Wellington side particularly, but it is still not good, get stuck behind a truck grinding it’s way up or down through that wiggly bit on the Wairarapa side

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  39. Yogibear (361 comments) says:

    mikenmild – I believe BCRs are an excellent way to compare similar projects.

    But that wasn’t what the Greens and Campit were arguing. They were arguing about financing structures.

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  40. tom hunter (4,703 comments) says:

    If you are going to make comment, at least do so consistent with the thread of that part of the conversation.

    And keep it concise mikenmild, no more than a sentence or two, preferably a question, so that other people can key off that and contribute interesting arguments. ;)

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  41. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    RRM
    All those things you mention – waiting times, etc – are reasons to use BCRs to compare the costs and returns of proposed alternatives. Transmission Gully just doesn’t stack up economically against the alternative of improving the existing route.

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  42. Pita (373 comments) says:

    Judith:

    “Do we have a percentage of the risk involved – an empirical evaluation based on factual evidence that this is likely to be the outcome”

    Is this the same degree of stringency that you demand from climate change scaremongers?

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  43. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    MarkF
    If a road tunnel was ever to have been built through the Rimutakas the 1950s would have been the time, when the Italian tunnellers had just finished the rail tunnel. I wouldn’t have thought the possibility of using the Waterview machinery would make too much difference to the overall costs of such a project. Like I said, the last time the Rimutakas were examined in detail was the 1980s and the tunnel option just didn’t stack up.
    Re Wellington generally, the city motto is ‘Suprema a situ’ – ‘Supreme by site’!

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  44. hmmokrightitis (1,585 comments) says:

    Judith:”from a party that has nothing positive to offer”.

    Really? I mean, really, really? After years of the shebeast and her haters and wreckers approach, national have nothing positive to offer. Judith, we get it. Key eats babies. And probably kills kittens too. But god you come out with some utter shite, you really do.

    And as for weddy, I lol’d over his bemoaning we arent stuck in the 50’s anymore comment the other day. Life and the world moves on weddy. Thank goodness for that. Otherwise wed be fighting the commie bastards, eating shit food, drinking fucking awful wine, and putting up with dipshits like you in parliament. The world changes, always has so, always will, and no amount of wishing for the good old days will change it. Look at labour – falling apart at the seams because they are unable to understand that who they purport to represent doesnt like them because they have been held to ransom by small groups looking for a voice.

    National and JK understand that the middle ground holds the key – too far either way an youre history. We like slow, steady and reliable. We like strong leaders who can also stand to laugh at themselves. You should try it.

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  45. RRM (9,784 comments) says:

    MarkF –

    I don’t know about the “Alice” TBM but in the good old days, tunnel boring machines tended to be completely stuffed by the end of their contract?

    I too used to be a proponent of a Rimutaka road tunnel… the tunnel itself could be quite short, because the summit of the present road is a fairly narrow knife-edged saddle that slopes steeply down to the floors of the valleys on both sides. So to my layman’s thinking a new low road could just follow the floors of the same valleys that the current road presently winds high up the sides of, to reach the tunnel in the base of the dividing saddle.

    But then my wife rightly pointed out that a 100km/h super highway through a tunnel to the Wairarapa would just attract even more riff-raff from the Hutt Valley into our area, so now I’m in favour of just keeping the Rimutaka hill the way it is. :-)

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  46. Yogibear (361 comments) says:

    Campit

    You disassemble and obfuscate.

    Firstly – you haven’t directly addressed the question about why its seemingly OK to borrow (which is where the majority of ongoing cost is regardless of public or private debt-financing) for CRL and not for TG

    Secondly, why would the government make the Public Sector Comparator available to ANYONE prior to striking a deal?

    If thats your approach to negotiations, please advise next time you are selling a house.

    Also, how do you back up your comment that the taxpayer is taking risk and the private sector isn’t. In both the Sydney and Brisbane examples, the failed consortia (namely their equity providers and their banks) wore the majority of the cost of failure. The taxpayer actually picked up the assets at a fraction of the cost resulting from that failure.

    In fact – the biggest problem with the Cross-Harbour tunnel in Sydney from a taxpayer perspective is the NSW government got too good a deal, which reduced the appetite from the private sector for future projects!

    Any decent PPP structure has the banks underwriting the failure, not the government – but I guess that doesn’t suit your world-view

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  47. Judith (8,534 comments) says:

    @ Pita (367 comments) says:
    July 30th, 2014 at 10:36 am

    I don’t get into the climate change debate to demand anything from any side of it. The science of that is way above my level of scientific knowledge.

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  48. projectman (207 comments) says:

    “The road is also a key component of the Government’s $2.6 billion project to build a 110km four-lane expressway between Levin and Wellington Airport, which will slash about 40 minutes off that journey during the morning peak.”

    Does that 40 minute saving take into account that now traffic will hit the on-going bottleneck at the Basin Reserve? Well-done you bunch of useless opposers who look for every opportunity to stifle every iniitiative in your anti-road traffic crusade.

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  49. hmmokrightitis (1,585 comments) says:

    I forgot to add:

    Im more than happy to pay a toll to use the new road into Wellington. Im equally happy for mikey to have a little red sticker on his car that proudly proclaims hes happy to use the existing coastal route.

    Then with all the crappy old socialists cars and their awful driving habits off the new road, we can up the speed limit to 120k :)

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  50. Reboot (101 comments) says:

    Judith – your grandfather would be disappointed in you.

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  51. flipper (3,950 comments) says:

    hmmokrightitis (1,510 comments) says:

    July 30th, 2014 at 10:39 am

    ****

    Well said Lake Tarawera…..

    S Alsop, circa 1969 wrote the definitive work : The real Majority.

    I note that recently that idiot Trotter claimed that there is no such thing as a majority of the centre.. Only a fucked in the head socialist would make such a claim in 2014. And as if he had not noticed, all of Europe/US economic woes are due to the fact that left oriented (and green jobs ) administrations forgot that it is no longer 1904…. And those f/wits wasn’t us to go down that road…..

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  52. campit (467 comments) says:

    Also, how do you back up your comment that the taxpayer is taking risk and the private sector isn’t. In both the Sydney and Brisbane examples, the failed consortia (namely their equity providers and their banks) wore the majority of the cost of failure.

    In Sydney and Brisbane, the private partner had some skin the game and was reliant on traffic volumes reaching a certain level, which they didn’t. The private sector have learnt from that and so with TG payment will be made as long as the road is “available.” So virtually no risk to the private partner.

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  53. hmmokrightitis (1,585 comments) says:

    flipper, totally agree. I can still hear my maternal grandfather (he died in the late 1980’s) banging on about ‘fair share’, whilst nicking as much as he could from his workplace; he had the obligatory photo of Savage on his mantlepiece until well into the 80’s. Hypocrite, like most lefties I know.

    And mm, Tarawera, I planning on escaping next week for a few days of trails. My new car arrived on Monday this week and shes crying out for some road time :)

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  54. Judith (8,534 comments) says:

    @ Reboot (85 comments) says:
    July 30th, 2014 at 11:00 am

    Judith – your grandfather would be disappointed in you.

    Oh no he wouldn’t. Who do you think taught me to speak up for wrong when I saw it. To never let the face of ‘popularity’ prevent me from saying what I really believe. To never shrink from adversity, or fail to recognise evil because it comes dressed in a well-cut suit. Who taught me to value of the voice spoken loudly, rather than the wimpish whisper of someone seeking numbers not truth.

    The only thing my Grandfather would be disappointed about today, is that the party he would have given his life for, has become dominated by idiots.

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  55. ShawnLH (4,482 comments) says:

    “The only thing my Grandfather would be disappointed about today, is that the party he would have given his life for, has become dominated by idiots.”

    Then don’t vote for Labour.;)

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  56. Yogibear (361 comments) says:

    Campit

    The article you link proves my point – particularly the fact that the government didn’t bail out the private sector when things went bad (yet PPPs are somehow a bad thing for the taxpayer… maybe you are right, cognotive dissonance is alive and well in Kiwiblog).

    But to address what I think you were trying to prove re: risk between private and public sectors. A tiny number of PPP roading projects post GFC have involved demand risk. Thats partly a function of PPP experience, and partly because the financiers are taking a less bullish view on financial risk in general.

    But to somehow suggest that as a result the taxpayer takes proportionately greater risk is ludicrous. That wonderful thing called the market evolved.

    Most roading PPP’s now include big availability incentives – in other words heavy financial incentives/penalties around keeping the traffic moving. I’ve got no doubt, if NZTA followed best practice, that the private sector is taking both daily level of service risk (including incident clearing and general corridor management) as well as event risk (e.g. clearing slips from those supposedly unstable hills).

    I’d imagine there will be some pretty hefty handback conditions as well meaning the road is in top notch condition (probably with a fresh resurfacing to a high standard) when the concession period is ended.

    As a road user and a taxpayer, that means a hell of alot more to me than a financial arrangement where the consortia is rewarded or penalised for volume rather than service.

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  57. Changeiscoming (179 comments) says:

    Nice timing just before the election to help Dunne take credit and get back in.

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  58. adze (2,090 comments) says:

    Changeiscoming – maybe he’ll get a speed camera ticket when he drives on it the first time. He seems particularly enamoured of those :)

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  59. OneTrack (2,981 comments) says:

    shawn – “Then don’t vote for Labour.;)”

    But “Dad” did.

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