35 more towns to get fibre under National

September 4th, 2014 at 2:31 pm by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

A further 5 per cent of New Zealanders will get ultrafast if is re-elected, the Government has announced.

National communications spokeswoman Amy Adams said the footprint of the -optic cable network would be extended from the original target of 75 per cent of the country to a new target of 80 per cent at a cost of between $152 million and $210m.

The extended programme would be funded from the Future Investment Fund.

Adams listed 35 towns she said would be “strong contenders” to join the existing 33 cities and towns getting UFB. They included some large towns such as Westport and Picton.

The UFB programme was the “most ambitious communications infrastructure programme in the world, given our low population density”, Adams said.

Excellent. A few shares in Air New Zealand or some power stations in exchange for another 5% of the population gaining fibre. A great move, and very welcome I am sure by the 200,000 extra New Zealanders who will now get fibre under this plan.

The towns named by Adams as strong contenders for UFB are: Te Puke, Motueka, Morrinsville, Kerikeri, Huntly, Thames, Matamata, Otaki, Kawerau, Waitara, Kaitaia, Dannevirke, Alexandra, Stratford, Whitianga, Cromwell, Taumarunui, Picton, Foxton, Kaikohe, Marton, Te Kuiti, Katikati, Temuka, Waihi, Waipukurau, Warkworth, Carterton, Dargaville, Opotiki, Snells Beach, Te Aroha, Wairoa, Paeroa and Westport.

National has led the way on having a fibre connected country. In 2008 all Labour was promising was VDSL to more of NZ. National promised and is delivering fibre to 75% of NZ, and now 80% of NZ. On top of that a big investment in rural broadband.

Tags: , ,

14 Responses to “35 more towns to get fibre under National”

  1. Kleva Kiwi (289 comments) says:

    Nice to see a lot of South Island towns on that list

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  2. SPC (5,619 comments) says:

    No problem with the investment, but the word contenders sort of deflates any confidence that it will be delivered to all these areas.

    As for financing it by selling shares that return more in dividends than the cost of public debt – why? The budget would have been in surplus if the shares were not sold.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 4 You need to be logged in to vote
  3. MikeG (425 comments) says:

    I hope that the Taxpayers Union can keep up with all of National’s bribes…

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 4 You need to be logged in to vote
  4. jawnbc (85 comments) says:

    Meanwhile half of Auckland isn’t on the list. Bogus “announcment”

    Vote: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  5. Sir Cullen's Sidekick (890 comments) says:

    Sorry DPF, I don’t share your enthusiasm in UFB. I will appreciate this announcement when I get UFB in circa 2150. The UFB rollout is happening at the speed with which Crim DotCon can run in a marathon.

    Vote: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 4 You need to be logged in to vote
  6. David Garrett (7,278 comments) says:

    Now I readily admit to being an old curmudgeon, 56 years of age…but I use the net and e-mail for my business, which is mostly in Tonga, while I live here… I mention this simply by way of background, and to illustrate that things interweb don’t scare me..

    Can someone explain to me how “ultra fast broadband” is some sort of magic potion for the economy? I just don’t get it…

    Vote: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  7. Berend de Boer (1,709 comments) says:

    DPF: National has led the way on having a fibre connected country.

    Having? After six years of National I still have no fiber here in Manukau city center. Basically since National’s “plan” I have seen not a single improvement in broadband here. Before that we got changes ever few years, ADSL, ADSL2, I’m sure we would have had VSDL by now if National hadn’t interfered with the market.

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  8. SPC (5,619 comments) says:

    DG, it should reduce road congestion and enable more New Zealanders to work wherever they live in New Zealand, not just the main centres. And it will assist provision of main centre business support services to rural/provincial centres – including education.

    Then there is the increased attraction of residence here for lifestyle reasons – attracting investors with capital from offshore.

    Vote: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  9. David Garrett (7,278 comments) says:

    SPC: Well, I sort of get that…but as I say, my e-mailing is done from here to Tonga..and I “get” that I can be out here in rural splendour or in some city shithole and do that….but I am already working from home, and the e-mail already reaches Tonga ( when their system is up, which is not always the case) within minutes if not seconds. e-mails sent around this country take seconds to reach their destination from my rural idyll, served I am told, with old copper wire.

    Lets stay UFB will mean my e-mail gets to Wellington in .5 of a second instead of the 5 seconds it takes now…How is that going to make any difference to my productivity? (Genuine question, I am a lawyer not a manufacturer or an architect, which is why I ask the question…it may be different for some)

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  10. Sir Cullen's Sidekick (890 comments) says:

    Uncle Garrett – UFB is not going to help with your emailing to Tonga. So get on with life and don’t get into UFB discussions. You could well use dial-up internet and save money if emailing to Tonga is your only and main use of internet.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  11. SPC (5,619 comments) says:

    DG, as you will appreciate some businesses (including online universities) communicate via teleconferencing and there is project work on the “mainframe” that requires a lot more data capacity to connect to.

    This is the era of 3 D printers.

    Saying that not all will require the speed or data amounts is like saying that investment to advantage new business will not directly advantage those in old businesses. It’s an observation, but not an excuse for inaction.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  12. cha (4,017 comments) says:

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  13. David Garrett (7,278 comments) says:

    SPC: thank you…as I said in my first post – which that other ill mannered fellow clearly hadn’t bothered to read – I recognised that my limited use of the interweb probably didn’t give me much basis to judge…I still get the feeling UFB might be a bit like Powerpoint presentations…a bit snazzier than one on an OHP (there’s one for the young players to work out) and I have been to a few of those where the presenter couldn’t work the damn thing…might as well have been an OHP

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  14. Tauhei Notts (1,713 comments) says:

    Save money on Kaikohe. The only wage earners there are social welfare officers.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote