Four new members’ bills

December 4th, 2015 at 10:00 am by David Farrar

The four drawn from the ballot were:

Customs and Excise (Prohibition of Imports Made by Slave Labour) Amendment Bill

This bill by Labour MP Peeni Henare bans the import of products made by slave labour.

There may be issues around how you define that, but should definitely go to select committee.

Public Works (Prohibition of Compulsory Acquisition of Māori Land) Amendment Bill

This bill by Green MP Catherine Delahunty amend the Public Works Act 1981 to protect Māori freehold and Māori customary land from being acquired by a Minister or local authority for public works. This would mean that no Māori land can be taken without consent.

I can’t see why Maori landowners would have special legal rights not available to other landowners. I’d vote against this.

Consumer Guarantees (Removal of Unrelated Party Lender Responsibility) Amendment Bill

This bill by National MP Shane Reti amends the Consumer Guarantees Act’s definition of supplier in the Act to exclude a lender who is an unrelated party from the definition of a supplier.

Looks technical and boring but worthy.

Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Exemption for RNZRSA Clubs from Special Licencing Requirements for Anzac Day) Amendment Bill

This bill by National MP Paul Foster-Bell  amends the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 to exempt those RNZRSA clubs that hold a current general liquor licence from having to seek an additional special licence to enable them to serve liquor before 1pm on Anzac Day.

Looks excellent. Ridiculous to make RSAs pay $500 for a special licence to be able to serve on ANZAC Day.

Which bills made first reading last night

December 3rd, 2015 at 11:00 am by David Farrar
  • Affordable Healthcare Bill (Winston Peters) defeated 46 to 75. Labour and NZ First in favour. Amazing that Labour claims it is committed to surpluses and votes for a massively expensive bill.
  • Education (Restoration of Democracy to University Councils) Amendment Bill (David Cunliffe) defeated 60 to 61. Labour, Greens and NZ First in favour
  • Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill (Jian Yang) passed. Labour and Greens against
  • Electricity Transparency Bill (David Shearer) – defeated 60 to 61. Labour, Greens and NZ First in favour
  • Commerce (Supermarket Adjudicator and Code of Conduct) Amendment Bill (Mojo Mathers) – defeated 60 to 61. Labour, Greens and NZ First in favour

Members’ bills ballot, Thursday 3 December 2015

December 3rd, 2015 at 10:00 am by David Farrar

Another giant ballot today.

A ballot to select five Members’ bills for introduction will take place at noon tomorrow.

Proposed members’ bills may be viewed here. Recently lodged bills may not yet be available.

A list of bills currently entered (as of last night) in the ballot is shown below.

  Bill Title Member Name
1 Accident Compensation (Recent Migrants and Returning New Zealanders) Amendment Bill Melissa Lee
2 Age of Majority (Attainment at 18 Years) Amendment Bill Brett Hudson
3 Arbitration Amendment Bill Tim Macindoe
4 Better Public Service Target Results Independent Audit Bill Darroch Ball
5 Broadcasting (Games of National Significance) Amendment Bill Clayton Mitchell
6 Burial and Cremation (Removal of Audit Requirement for Cemetery Trusts) Amendment Bill Hon Clayton Cosgrove
7 Buy New Zealand (Procurement) Bill Barbara Stewart
8 Celebrant Eligibility Expansion Bill Chris Bishop
9 Charter Schools (Application of Official Information and Ombudsmen Acts) Bill Hon Nanaia Mahuta
10 Child Poverty Reduction and Eradication Bill Jacinda Ardern
11 Children, Young Persons, and Their Families (Parent’s and Guardian’s Responsibility) Amendment Bill Barbara Kuriger
12 Companies (Annual Report Notice Requirements) Amendment Bill Matt Doocey
13 Consumer Guarantees (Removal of Unrelated Party Lender Responsibility) Amendment Bill Dr Shane Reti
14 Copyright (Parody and Satire) Amendment Bill Gareth Hughes
15 Credit Contracts and Consumer Finance (Break Fees Disclosure) Amendment Bill Simon O’Connor
16 Credit Reforms (Responsible Lending) Bill Kris Faafoi
17 Crimes (Corporate Manslaughter) Amendment Bill Hon Damien O’Connor
18 Crimes (Covert Intimate Filming of Incapacitated Persons) Amendment Bill Tracey Martin
19 Crimes (Increased Penalty for Providing Explosive to Commit Crime) Amendment Bill Todd Muller
20 Crimes (Non-fatal Strangulation) Amendment Bill Kelvin Davis
21 Criminal Procedure (Removing Paedophile Name Suppression) Amendment Bill Pita Paraone
22 Crown Minerals (Homes and Residences Exemption) Amendment Bill Eugenie Sage
23 Crown Minerals (Protection of World Heritage Sites) Amendment Bill Hon Ruth Dyson
24 Customs and Excise (Prohibition of Imports Made by Slave Labour) Amendment Bill Peeni Henare
25 Domestic Violence—Victims’ Protection Bill Jan Logie
26 Education (Charter Schools Abolition) Amendment Bill Chris Hipkins
27 Education (Charter Schools Teacher Quality) Amendment Bill Hon Phil Goff
28 Education (Public Good not Profit from Charter Schools) Amendment Bill Dr David Clark
29 Electricity Industry (Energy Efficiency) Amendment Bill Rino Tirikatene
30 Employment Relations (Allowing Higher Earners to Contract Out of Personal Grievance Provisions) Amendment Bill Scott Simpson
31 Employment Relations (Certainty at Work) Amendment Bill Iain Lees-Galloway
32 Employment Relations (Restoring Kiwis’ Right to a Break at Work) Amendment Bill Sue Moroney
33 Employment Relations (Triangular Employment) Amendment Bill Stuart Nash
34 End of Life Choice Bill David Seymour
35 Environment Canterbury (Democracy Restoration) Amendment Bill Dr Megan Woods
36 Equal Pay Amendment Bill Marama Davidson
37 Family Proceedings (Paternity Tests and Parentage Orders) Amendment Bill Sarah Dowie
38 Housing Restructuring and Tenancy Matters (Assured Tenancies) Amendment Bill Jenny Salesa
39 Human Rights (Disability Assist Dogs Non-Discrimination) Amendment Bill Mojo Mathers
40 Immigration (Refugee Quota) Amendment Bill Denise Roche
41 Income Tax (Clean Transport FBT Exclusions) Amendment Bill Julie Anne Genter
42 Independent Prison Inspectorate Bill David Clendon
43 International Non-Aggression and Lawful Use of Force (Implementation of Amendment to Statute of Rome) Bill Dr Kennedy Graham
44 International Transparent Treaties Bill Fletcher Tabuteau
45 Kirpan Authorisation Bill Kanwaljit Singh Bakshi
46 Land Transfer (Foreign Ownership of Land Register) Amendment Bill Mahesh Bindra
47 Land Transport (Tourist Driver Rental Vehicle) Amendment Bill Denis O’Rourke
48 Land Transport (Wheel Clamping Protection) Amendment Bill Phil Twyford
49 Lawyers and Conveyancers (Protection of Community Law Centre Funding) Amendment Bill Carmel Sepuloni
50 Legislation (Climate Impact Disclosure Statement) Amendment Bill James Shaw
51 Life Jackets for Children and Young Persons Bill Alfred Ngaro
52 Litter (Increased Infringement Fee) Amendment Bill Jono Naylor
53 Local Government (Customer Focus) Amendment Bill Jacqui Dean
54 Local Government (Four Well-beings) Amendment Bill Su’a William Sio
55 Local Government (Freedom of Access) Amendment Bill Jonathan Young
56 Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill Joanne Hayes
57 Meat Industry Restructuring Bill Richard Prosser
58 Military Decorations and Distinctive Badges (Modernisation) Amendment Bill Todd Barclay
59 New Zealand Public Health and Disability (Child Health Obesity Target) Amendment Bill Hon Annette King
60 Oaths and Declarations (Members of Parliament) Amendment Bill Meka Whaitiri
61 Ombudsmen (Cost Recovery) Amendment Bill Hon David Parker
62 Our Work Our Future Bill Andrew Little
63 Private International Law (Choice of Law in Tort) Bill David Bennett
64 Public Finance (Sustainable Development Indicators) Amendment Bill Steffan Browning
65 Public Works (Prohibition of Compulsory Acquisition of Māori Land) Amendment Bill Catherine Delahunty
66 Radio New Zealand (Catch-up Funding) Amendment Bill Clare Curran
67 Radiocommunications (Enhanced Public Broadcasting Provision) Amendment Bill Adrian Rurawhe
68 Receiverships (Agricultural Debt Mediation) Amendment Bill Ron Mark
69 Residential Tenancies (Warm, Safe, and Secure Rentals) Amendment Bill Metiria Turei
70 Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Exemption for RNZRSA Clubs from Special Licencing Requirements for Anzac Day) Amendment Bill Paul Foster-Bell
71 Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Renewal of Licences) Amendment Bill Louisa Wall
72 Sentencing (Domestic Violence) Amendment Bill Poto Williams
73 Sentencing (Livestock Rustling) Amendment Bill Ian McKelvie
74 Shop Trading Hours Act Repeal (Shopping Centre Opening Hours) Amendment Bill Hon Trevor Mallard
75 Social Security (Apprenticeship Assistance for Youth) Amendment Bill Grant Robertson
76 Summary Offences (Increased Penalty for Seeking Donations by False Pretence) Amendment Bill Nuk Korako
77 Vulnerable Children (Mandatory Social Worker Registration) Amendment Bill Ria Bond
78 Waitemata Harbour Protection Bill Rt Hon Winston Peters
79 Wildlife (Threatened Species Protection) Amendment Bill Kevin Hague

The bills by party (Ministers excluded) are:

  • National – 22/34
  • Labour – 30/32
  • Greens – 14/14
  • NZ First -12/12
  • Maori – 0/1
  • ACT – 1/1
  • Total – 79/94

New members’ bills

November 12th, 2015 at 2:00 pm by David Farrar

The four bills selected for first reading are:

Commerce (Supermarket Adjudicator and Code of Conduct) Amendment Bill – Mojo Mathers

This Bill amends the Commerce Act 1986 to require that a supermarket adjudicator is established, to resolve disputes between supermarkets and suppliers. The adjudicator will be funded by a levy of supermarkets and suppliers and will have power to involve the Commerce Commission when required.

You don’t need a government appointed regulator to solve commercial disputes between supermarkets and suppliers, let alone one funded by a compulsory levy on them. We already have the Commerce Act.

Yes Countdown was a bit of a bully with some of its suppliers, and they suffered a media backlash and have lost market share as a result, and also quite a few suppliers.  I would vote against.

Overseas Investment (Protection of New Zealand Homebuyers) Amendment Bill – Phil Twyford

Under the provisions of this Bill, non-residents will be granted permission to purchase a residential property only if they intend to live here permanently or their purchase adds to our existing housing stock.

Would also vote against this bill.  The impact on house prices of foreign buyers is relatively minor compared to land supply issues. And it may also breach CER with Australia.

Oaths and Declarations (Endorsing the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi) Amendment Bill – Marama Fox

The purpose of this bill is to ensure that a person taking any oath set out in statute may, in addition to the words of the oath, elect to state that they will perform their duties in accordance with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi. This recognises that the Treaty of Waitangi is New Zealand’s founding document and the Government is committed to fulfilling its obligations as a Treaty partner.

I’m against as the principles of the Treaty are not well defined, and people may them use such an oath to justify breaking the law by saying they are required to by their oath. Also it is not for people to act in accordance with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi – but for the Government as a whole.

Social Security (Stopping Benefit Payments for Offenders who Repeatedly Fail to Comply with Community Sentences) Amendment Bill – Mark Mitchell

This bill would give the Department of Corrections the power to issue warnings to persons who have not complied with community-based sentences, with the consequence of withholding benefit payments.

Sounds reasonable. There may be some fish-hooks in it, but worth considering at select committee.

Members’ bills ballot 12 November 2015

November 12th, 2015 at 11:30 am by David Farrar

A Members’ bill ballot will be held at noon today. Four bills will be drawn.

Proposed members’ bills may be viewed here. Recently lodged bills may not yet be available.

The bills entered in the ballot are listed below.

Bill Title Member Name
1 Accident Compensation (Recent Migrants and Returning New Zealanders) Amendment Bill Melissa Lee
2 Age of Majority (Attainment at 18 Years) Amendment Bill Brett Hudson
3 Arbitration Amendment Bill Tim Macindoe
4 Better Public Service Target Results Independent Audit Bill Darroch Ball
5 Broadcasting (Games of National Significance) Amendment Bill Clayton Mitchell
6 Buy New Zealand (Procurement) Bill Barbara Stewart
7 Celebrant Eligibility Expansion Bill Chris Bishop
8 Charter Schools (Application of Official Information and Ombudsmen Acts) Bill Hon Nanaia Mahuta
9 Child Poverty Reduction and Eradication Bill Jacinda Ardern
10 Children, Young Persons, and Their Families (Parent’s and Guardian’s Responsibility) Amendment Bill Barbara Kuriger
11 Commerce (Supermarket Adjudicator and Code of Conduct) Amendment Bill Mojo Mathers
12 Companies (Annual Report Notice Requirements) Amendment Bill Matt Doocey
13 Consumer Guarantees (Removal of Unrelated Party Lender Responsibility) Amendment Bill Dr Shane Reti
14 Copyright (Parody and Satire) Amendment Bill Gareth Hughes
15 Credit Contracts and Consumer Finance (Break Fees Disclosure) Amendment Bill Simon O’Connor
16 Credit Reforms (Responsible Lending) Bill Kris Faafoi
17 Crimes (Corporate Manslaughter) Amendment Bill Hon Damien O’Connor
18 Crimes (Increased Penalty for Providing Explosive to Commit Crime) Amendment Bill Todd Muller
19 Crimes (Non-fatal Strangulation) Amendment Bill Kelvin Davis
20 Criminal Procedure (Removing Paedophile Name Suppression) Amendment Bill Pita Paraone
21 Crown Minerals (Homes and Residences Exemption) Amendment Bill Eugenie Sage
22 Crown Minerals (Protection of World Heritage Sites) Amendment Bill Hon Ruth Dyson
23 Customs and Excise (Prohibition of Imports Made by Slave Labour) Amendment Bill Peeni Henare
24 Domestic Violence—Victims’ Protection Bill Jan Logie
25 Education (Charter Schools Abolition) Amendment Bill Chris Hipkins
26 Education (Charter Schools Teacher Quality) Amendment Bill Hon Phil Goff
27 Education (Public Good not Profit from Charter Schools) Amendment Bill Dr David Clark
28 Electricity Industry (Energy Efficiency) Amendment Bill Rino Tirikatene
29 Employment Relations (Allowing Higher Earners to Contract Out of Personal Grievance Provisions) Amendment Bill Scott Simpson
30 Employment Relations (Certainty at Work) Amendment Bill Iain Lees-Galloway
31 Employment Relations (Restoring Kiwis’ Right to a Break at Work) Amendment Bill Sue Moroney
32 Employment Relations (Triangular Employment) Amendment Bill Stuart Nash
33 End of Life Choice Bill David Seymour
34 Environment Canterbury (Democracy Restoration) Amendment Bill Dr Megan Woods
35 Equal Pay Amendment Bill Marama Davidson
36 Family Proceedings (Paternity Orders and Parentage Tests) Amendment Bill Jacqui Dean
37 Housing Restructuring and Tenancy Matters (Assured Tenancies) Amendment Bill Jenny Salesa
38 Immigration (Refugee Quota) Amendment Bill Denise Roche
39 Income Tax (Clean Transport FBT Exclusions) Amendment Bill Julie Anne Genter
40 Independent Prison Inspectorate Bill David Clendon
41 International Non-Aggression and Lawful Use of Force (Implementation of Amendment to Statute of Rome) Bill Dr Kennedy Graham
42 International Transparent Treaties Bill Fletcher Tabuteau
43 Kirpan Authorisation Bill Kanwaljit Singh Bakshi
44 Land Transfer (Foreign Ownership of Land Register) Amendment Bill Mahesh Bindra
45 Land Transport (Tourist Driver Rental Vehicle) Amendment Bill Denis O’Rourke
46 Lawyers and Conveyancers (Protection of Community Law Centre Funding) Amendment Bill Carmel Sepuloni
47 Legislation (Climate Impact Disclosure Statement) Amendment Bill James Shaw
48 Life Jackets for Children and Young Persons Bill Alfred Ngaro
49 Litter (Increased Infringement Fee) Amendment Bill Jono Naylor
50 Local Government (Four Well-beings) Amendment Bill Su’a William Sio
51 Local Government (Freedom of Access) Amendment Bill Jonathan Young
52 Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill Joanne Hayes
53 Meat Industry Restructuring Bill Richard Prosser
54 Military Decorations and Distinctive Badges (Modernisation) Amendment Bill Todd Barclay
55 New Zealand Public Health and Disability (Child Health Obesity Target) Amendment Bill Hon Annette King
56 Oaths and Declarations (Endorsing the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi) Amendment Bill Marama Fox
57 Oaths and Declarations (Members of Parliament) Amendment Bill Meka Whaitiri
58 Ombudsmen (Cost Recovery) Amendment Bill Hon David Parker
59 Our Work Our Future Bill Andrew Little
60 Overseas Investment (Protection of New Zealand Homebuyers) Amendment Bill Phil Twyford
61 Private International Law (Choice of Law in Tort) Bill David Bennett
62 Public Finance (Sustainable Development Indicators) Amendment Bill Steffan Browning
63 Public Works (Prohibition of Compulsory Acquisition of Māori Land) Amendment Bill Catherine Delahunty
64 Radio New Zealand (Catch-up Funding) Amendment Bill Clare Curran
65 Radiocommunications (Enhanced Public Broadcasting Provision) Amendment Bill Adrian Rurawhe
66 Receiverships (Agricultural Debt Mediation) Amendment Bill Ron Mark
67 Residential Tenancies (Warm, Safe, and Secure Rentals) Amendment Bill Metiria Turei
68 Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Exemption for RNZRSA Clubs from Special Licencing Requirements for Anzac Day) Amendment Bill Paul Foster-Bell
69 Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Renewal of Licences) Amendment Bill Louisa Wall
70 Sentencing (Domestic Violence) Amendment Bill Poto Williams
71 Sentencing (Livestock Rustling) Amendment Bill Ian McKelvie
72 Shop Trading Hours Act Repeal (Shopping Centre Opening Hours) Amendment Bill Hon Trevor Mallard
73 Social Security (Apprenticeship Assistance for Youth) Amendment Bill Grant Robertson
74 Social Security (Stopping Benefit Payments for Offenders who Repeatedly Fail to Comply with Community Sentences) Amendment Bill Mark Mitchell
75 Summary Offences (Increased Penalty for Seeking Donations by False Pretence) Amendment Bill Nuk Korako
76 Vulnerable Children (Mandatory Social Worker Registration) Amendment Bill Ria Bond
77 Waitemata Harbour Protection Bill Rt Hon Winston Peters
78 Wildlife (Threatened Species Protection) Amendment Bill Kevin Hague

The bills by party (Ministers excluded) are:

  • National – 22/34
  • Labour – 29/32
  • Greens – 14/14
  • NZ First -11/12
  • Maori – 1/1
  • ACT – 1/1
  • Total – 78/94

Really good to see six extra National MPs with bills in the ballot. My campaign must be working!

UPDATE: The four bills selected are:

  • Commerce (Supermarket Adjudicator and Code of Conduct) Amendment Bill – Mojo Mathers
  • Overseas Investment (Protection of New Zealand Homebuyers) Amendment Bill – Phil Twyford
  • Oaths and Declarations (Endorsing the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi) Amendment Bill – Marama Fox
  • Social Security (Stopping Benefit Payments for Offenders who Repeatedly Fail to Comply with Community Sentences) Amendment Bill – Mark Mitchell

So National, Labour, Greens and Maori Party each had a bill selected.

Four new members’ bills

October 16th, 2015 at 10:00 am by David Farrar

The bills drawn from the ballot were:

Education (Restoration of Democracy to University Councils) Amendment Bill – Hon David Cunliffe

This Bill repeals the changes makes by Parliament earlier this year to reduce the size of university councils and sets minimum quotas for different sector groups to be on the Councils.

As it seeks to reverse a change made by Parliament just a few months ago it is a waste of time and should be defeated.

Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill – Dr Jian Yang

This Bill seeks to protect vulnerable members of society from child sex offenders by preventing those individuals convicted of a child
sex offence(s) from changing their name. This will ensure that the appropriate agencies can properly manage these offenders to assist
in their rehabilitation and to maintain public safety.

I’m unsure how much of a problem this is, but it certainly is worth supporting at least to select committee.

Electricity Transparency Bill – David Shearer

This Bill amends the Electricity Industry Act 2010 to require that every electricity bill sent to domestic consumers includes a list
itemising the amount and percentage for each of the different components comprising the bill. At present, consumers have no way of knowing what part of their power bill goes to the generator, transmitter, distributer, and retailer, and what part is accounted for by GST and other Government levies. This state of affairs allows different parts of the sector to blame price increases on other industry participants.

This seems a reasonable bill worth supporting to select committee. However it may be impractical as the ratio of costs may vary from month to month, or even day to day with spot prices.

It also requires bills to state the percentage of electicity used which is renewable and again I am not sure how practical that is, as this could change constantly

Healthy Homes Guarantee Bill (No 2) – Andrew Little

This Bill amends the Residential Tenancies Act 1986 with the purpose of ensuring that every rental home in New Zealand meets minimum standards of heating and insulation. The Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment is to set the standards and landlords are to meet the standards.

The Speaker has ruled this bill is in beach of standing orders as it is near identical to a bill already defeated in Parliament this year. It is unlikely to pass first reading (as happened to the previous one) but if it does so this calendar year, it will be ruled out or order.

Members’ bills ballot 15 October 2015

October 15th, 2015 at 11:30 am by David Farrar

A Members’ bill ballot will be held at noon today. Four bills will be drawn.

The bills entered in the ballot are listed below.

  Bill Title Member Name
1 Accident Compensation (Recent Migrants and Returning New Zealanders) Amendment Bill Melissa Lee
2 Age of Majority (Attainment at 18 Years) Amendment Bill Brett Hudson
3 Arbitration Amendment Bill Jono Naylor
4 Better Public Service Target Results Independent Audit Bill Darroch Ball
5 Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill Dr Jian Yang
6 Broadcasting (Games of National Significance) Amendment Bill Barbara Stewart
7 Buy New Zealand (Procurement) Bill Clayton Mitchell
8 Charter Schools (Application of Official Information and Ombudsmen Acts) Bill Hon Nanaia Mahuta
9 Child Poverty Reduction and Eradication Bill Jacinda Ardern
10 Children, Young Persons, and Their Families (Parent’s and Guardian’s Responsibility) Amendment Bill Barbara Kuriger
11 Commerce (Supermarket Adjudicator and Code of Conduct) Amendment Bill Mojo Mathers
12 Copyright (Parody and Satire) Amendment Bill Gareth Hughes
13 Credit Contracts and Consumer Finance (Break Fees Disclosure) Amendment Bill Simon O’Connor
14 Credit Reforms (Responsible Lending) Amendment Bill Kris Faafoi
15 Crimes (Corporate Manslaughter) Amendment Bill Hon Damien O’Connor
16 Crimes (Non-fatal Strangulation) Amendment Bill Kelvin Davis
17 Criminal Procedure (Removing Paedophile Name Suppression) Amendment Bill Pita Paraone
18 Crown Minerals (Homes and Residences Exemption) Amendment Bill Eugenie Sage
19 Crown Minerals (Protection of World Heritage Sites) Amendment Bill Hon Ruth Dyson
20 Customs and Excise (Prohibition of Imports Made by Slave Labour) Amendment Bill Peeni Henare
21 Domestic Violence—Victims’ Protection Bill Jan Logie
22 Education (Charter Schools Abolition) Amendment Bill Chris Hipkins
23 Education (Charter Schools Teacher Quality) Amendment Bill Hon Phil Goff
24 Education (Public Good not Profit from Charter Schools) Amendment Bill Dr David Clark
25 Education (Restoration of Democracy to University Councils) Amendment Bill Hon David Cunliffe
26 Electricity Industry (Energy Efficiency) Amendment Bill Rino Tirikatene
27 Electricity Transparency Bill David Shearer
28 Employment Relations (Allowing Higher Earners to Contract Out of Personal Grievance Provisions) Amendment Bill Scott Simpson
29 Employment Relations (Certainty at Work) Amendment Bill Iain Lees-Galloway
30 Employment Relations (Restoring Kiwis’ Right to a Break at Work) Amendment Bill Jenny Salesa
31 Employment Relations (Triangular Employment) Amendment Bill Stuart Nash
32 End of Life Choice Bill David Seymour
33 Environment Canterbury (Democracy Restoration) Amendment Bill Dr Megan Woods
34 Equal Pay Amendment Bill Julie Anne Genter
35 Family Proceedings (Paternity Orders and Parentage Tests) Amendment Bill Jacqui Dean
36 Fisheries (Precautionary Approach) Amendment Bill Dr Russel Norman
37 Healthy Homes Guarantee Bill (No 2) Andrew Little
38 Immigration (Refugee Quota) Amendment Bill Denise Roche
39 Independent Prison Inspectorate Bill David Clendon
40 International Non-Aggression and Lawful Use of Force (Implementation of Amendment to Statute of Rome) Bill Dr Kennedy Graham
41 International Transparent Treaties Bill Fletcher Tabuteau
42 Kirpan Authorisation Bill Kanwaljit Singh Bakshi
43 Kiwi Jobs Bill Sue Moroney
44 Land Transfer (Foreign Ownership of Land Register) Amendment Bill Mahesh Bindra
45 Land Transport (Tourist Driver Rental Vehicle) Amendment Bill Denis O’Rourke
46 Lawyers and Conveyancers (Protection of Community Law Centre Funding) Amendment Bill Carmel Sepuloni
47 Legislation (Climate Impact Disclosure Statement) Amendment Bill James Shaw
48 Life Jackets for Children and Young Persons Bill Alfred Ngaro
49 Local Government (Four Well-beings) Amendment Bill Su’a William Sio
50 Local Government (Freedom of Access) Amendment Bill Tim Macindoe
51 Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill Joanne Hayes
52 Meat Industry Restructuring Bill Richard Prosser
53 New Zealand Public Health and Disability (Child Health Obesity Target) Amendment Bill Hon Annette King
54 Oaths and Declarations (Endorsing the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi) Amendment Bill Marama Fox
55 Oaths and Declarations (Members of Parliament) Amendment Bill Meka Whaitiri
56 Ombudsmen (Cost Recovery) Amendment Bill Hon David Parker
57 Overseas Investment (Protection of New Zealand Homebuyers) Amendment Bill Phil Twyford
58 Private International Law (Choice of Law in Tort) Bill David Bennett
59 Prostitution Reform (Regulate Street Prostitution) Amendment Bill Tracey Martin
60 Public Finance (Sustainable Development Indicators) Amendment Bill Steffan Browning
61 Public Works (Prohibition of Compulsory Acquisition of Māori Land) Amendment Bill Catherine Delahunty
62 Radio New Zealand (Catch-up Funding) Amendment Bill Clare Curran
63 Radiocommunications (Enhanced Public Broadcasting Provision) Amendment Bill Adrian Rurawhe
64 Receiverships (Agricultural Debt Mediation) Amendment Bill Ron Mark
65 Residential Tenancies (Warm, Safe, and Secure Rentals) Amendment Bill Metiria Turei
66 Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Exemption for RNZRSA Clubs from Special Licencing Requirements for Anzac Day) Amendment Bill Paul Foster-Bell
67 Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Renewal of Licences) Amendment Bill Louisa Wall
68 Sentencing (Domestic Violence) Amendment Bill Poto Williams
69 Sentencing (Livestock Rustling) Amendment Bill Ian McKelvie
70 Shop Trading Hours Act Repeal (Shopping Centre Opening Hours) Amendment Bill Hon Trevor Mallard
71 Social Security (Apprenticeship Assistance for Youth) Amendment Bill Grant Robertson
72 Social Security (Stopping Benefit Payments for Offenders who Repeatedly Fail to Comply with Community Sentences) Amendment Bill Mark Mitchell
73 Vulnerable Children (Mandatory Social Worker Registration) Amendment Bill Ria Bond
74 Waitemata Harbour Protection Bill Rt Hon Winston Peters
75 Wildlife (Threatened Species Protection) Amendment Bill Kevin Hague

The bills by party (Ministers excluded) are:

  • National – 16/34
  • Labour – 31/32
  • Greens – 14/14
  • NZ First -12/12
  • Maori – 1/1
  • ACT – 1/1
  • Total – 75/94

If the other 18 National MPs got a bill in the ballot (or could get agreement of the hierarchy for their bills) then the chances of a non hostile bill being drawn would increase from 16/75 to 34/91 or from 21% to 37%.

Why National should support Gareth Hughes’ bill at first reading

October 13th, 2015 at 6:00 am by David Farrar

Gareth Hughes has a bill up for first reading soon called the Electricity Industry (Small-Scale Renewable Distributed Generation) Amendment Bill.

I hope the Government/National votes for the bill at first reading, for three reasons.

  1. It is a (fairly rare) constructive opposition bill that has identified an issue, and is not proposing a solution that is just designed to get National to vote against it
  2. While the bill’s solution may not be the best answer to the problem, even having select committee hearings into the bill may lead to better outcomes with pressure on energy companies
  3. National would gain kudos for supporting a bill which could encourage more people to sell surplus solar back into the grid.

This Stuff article highlights the current problem:

“The bill is trying to fix a serious problem, which is that thousands of Kiwis are going solar and finding the electricity companies have all the power.

“My bill would empower the Electricity Authority to act as an independent umpire to make sure that solar consumers get a fair go,” Hughes said.

At present companies set the price when they buy back electricity from customers who generate more power than they use.

Hughes said Meridian Energy used to pay 26 cents per kilowatt hour to consumers who had generated extra electricity, but were now paying between 8 and 10c.

DC Power business manager Sarah Laurence said the pricing was discouraging consumers from going solar.

The company installed solar panels for Barbara and Atsushi Taniyama at their Palmerston North restaurant Yatai. Laurence said expansion could have been on the cards if the buy-back price was certain.

“The dropping price has prevented them from putting in a bigger system,” Laurence said.

So the problem with the status quo is that prices for buying back excess solar have dropped by around two thirds, and there is no price certainty.

A further Stuff article explains:

Almost every region had different rules, regulations and need for resource consents in order to install solar panels, Hughes said.

And alongside that, power companies held the literal and metaphorical power when it came to setting buy-back rates. Hughes said rates had fluctuated from 17 cents to as low as 4 cents, without more than a month’s notice, leaving those signed onto solar energy in a constant state of uncertainty, he said. 

“I’m not asking for it to subsidised, I’m proposing the Electricity Authority to act as an independent umpire and set a fair and reasonable buy-back rate.” 

Now I’m not convinced that having the Electricity Authority set the rate will be the best solution, as I’d like to see power companies compete to offer the best rates for buying back surplus solar.

But I think it is a reasonable option that should be considered by a select committee. A select committee could hear from solar users and hear from energy companies, and consider the size of the problem, and what the best solution is.

As I said above, just the scrutiny of the select committee may be enough to get some companies to offer better terms – that might not even be higher rates, but guaranteed price stability over a period of time.

I also think it is good to be constructive with an opposition bill, when it is not proposing something hugely expensive, or is just trying to make the Government vote against something for scaremongering purposes (such as Clayton Cosgrove’s ludicrous bill to stop the Government selling Kiwibank).

So I hope the National caucus decides to back the bill at first reading. There will be many grateful solar users if they do decide this is an issue worth select committee scrutiny.

New member’s bills

September 18th, 2015 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

The three bills drawn from the ballot yesterday are:

Social Security (Pathway to Work) Amendment Bill – Labour MP Carmel Sepuloni

This Bill lifts the threshold of how much persons can earn before their benefit is reduced by abatement rates. The thresholds
are currently $80 per week for those on Jobseeker Support and $100 per week for Sole Parent Payment and Supported Living Payment and this increases them to $150 per week.

It is not necessarily a bad thing to have a higher threshold before abatement starts, but what would be useful to know is the cost to the taxpayer if this bill is accepted.

Climate Change (Divestment from Fossil Fuels) Bill – Green MP Dr Russel Norman

This bill will would ban public fund managers (such as ACC, NZ Super Fund, Govt Super Fund) from investing in companies directly involved in the mining and production of fossil fuels.

It is a ridiculous bill.

Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Amendment Bill – Labour MP Clare Curran

This Bill amends the Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Act 2013 and establishes a Technical Advisory Board to which matters must be referred in instances where the Minister will be required to exercise his or her discretion or prescribe an additional area of specified security interest.

I think this bill is worth supporting, at least at first reading. The TAB would provide expert advice to the Minister on network security, and they can analyse and make recommendations around intended directives.

Members’ bills ballot 17 September 2015

September 17th, 2015 at 10:27 am by David Farrar

A Members’ bill ballot will be held at noon today. Three bills will be drawn.

The bills entered in the ballot are listed below.

  Bill Title Member Name
1 Accident Compensation (Recent Migrants and Returning New Zealanders) Amendment Bill Melissa Lee
2 Age of Majority (Attainment at 18 Years) Amendment Bill Brett Hudson
3 Better Public Service Target Results Independent Audit Bill Darroch Ball
4 Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill Dr Jian Yang
5 Broadcasting (Games of National Significance) Amendment Bill Barbara Stewart
6 Buy New Zealand (Procurement) Bill Fletcher Tabuteau
7 Charter Schools (Application of Official Information and Ombudsmen Acts) Bill Hon Nanaia Mahuta
8 Child Poverty Reduction and Eradication Bill Jacinda Ardern
9 Children, Young Persons, and Their Families (Parent’s and Guardian’s Responsibility) Amendment Bill Barbara Kuriger
10 Climate Change (Divestment from Fossil Fuels) Bill Dr Russel Norman
11 Commerce (Supermarket Adjudicator and Code of Conduct) Amendment Bill Mojo Mathers
12 Copyright (Parody and Satire) Amendment Bill Gareth Hughes
13 Credit Contracts and Consumer Finance (Break Fees Disclosure) Amendment Bill Simon O’Connor
14 Credit Reforms (Responsible Lending) Bill Kris Faafoi
15 Crimes (Corporate Manslaughter) Amendment Bill Hon Damien O’Connor
16 Crimes (Non-fatal Strangulation) Amendment Bill Kelvin Davis
17 Criminal Procedure (Removing Paedophile Name Suppression) Amendment Bill Pita Paraone
18 Crown Minerals (Protection of World Heritage Sites) Amendment Bill Hon Ruth Dyson
19 Customs and Excise (Prohibition of Imports Made by Slave Labour) Amendment Bill Peeni Henare
20 Domestic Violence—Victims’ Protection Bill Jan Logie
21 Education (Charter Schools Abolition) Amendment Bill Chris Hipkins
22 Education (Charter Schools Teacher Quality) Amendment Bill Hon Phil Goff
23 Education (Public Good not Profit from Charter Schools) Amendment Bill Dr David Clark
24 Education (Restoration of Democracy to University Councils) Amendment Bill Hon David Cunliffe
25 Electricity Industry (Energy Efficiency) Amendment Bill Rino Tirikatene
26 Electricity Transparency Bill David Shearer
27 Employment Relations (Allowing Higher Earners to Contract Out of Personal Grievance Provisions) Amendment Bill Scott Simpson
28 Employment Relations (Certainty at Work) Amendment Bill Iain Lees-Galloway
29 Employment Relations (Restoring Kiwis’ Right to a Break at Work) Amendment Bill Jenny Salesa
30 Employment Relations (Triangular Employment) Amendment Bill Stuart Nash
31 Environment Canterbury (Democracy Restoration) Amendment Bill Dr Megan Woods
32 Family Proceedings (Paternity Orders and Parentage Tests) Amendment Bill Jacqui Dean
33 Healthy Homes Guarantee Bill (No 2) Andrew Little
34 Immigration (Refugee Quota) Amendment Bill Denise Roche
35 Independent Prison Inspectorate Bill David Clendon
36 International Non-Aggression and Lawful Use of Force (Implementation of Amendment to Statute of Rome) Bill Dr Kennedy Graham
37 Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary Establishment Bill Eugenie Sage
38 Kirpan Authorisation Bill Kanwaljit Singh Bakshi
39 Kiwi Jobs Bill Sue Moroney
40 Land Transfer (Foreign Ownership of Land Register) Amendment Bill Mahesh Bindra
41 Land Transport (Tourist Driver Rental Vehicle) Amendment Bill Denis O’Rourke
42 Land Transport (Vulnerable Road Users) Amendment Bill Julie Anne Genter
43 Legislation (Climate Impact Disclosure Statement) Amendment Bill James Shaw
44 Life Jackets for Children and Young Persons Bill Alfred Ngaro
45 Local Government (Four Well-beings) Amendment Bill Su’a William Sio
46 Local Government (Freedom of Access) Amendment Bill Paul Foster-Bell
47 Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill Joanne Hayes
48 Meat Industry Restructuring Bill Richard Prosser
49 New Zealand Public Health and Disability (Child Health Obesity Target) Amendment Bill Hon Annette King
50 Oaths and Declarations (Endorsing the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi) Amendment Bill Marama Fox
51 Oaths and Declarations (Members of Parliament) Amendment Bill Meka Whaitiri
52 Overseas Investment (Protection of New Zealand Homebuyers) Amendment Bill Phil Twyford
53 Private International Law (Choice of Law in Tort) Bill David Bennett
54 Prostitution Reform (Regulate Street Prostitution) Amendment Bill Tracey Martin
55 Public Finance (Sustainable Development Indicators) Amendment Bill Steffan Browning
56 Public Works (Prohibition of Compulsory Acquisition of Māori Land) Amendment Bill Catherine Delahunty
57 Radiocommunications (Enhanced Public Broadcasting Provision) Amendment Bill Adrian Rurawhe
58 Receiverships (Agricultural Debt Mediation) Amendment Bill Ron Mark
59 Residential Tenancies (Warm, Safe, and Secure Rentals) Amendment Bill Metiria Turei
60 Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Renewal of Licences) Amendment Bill Louisa Wall
61 Sentencing (Domestic Violence) Amendment Bill Poto Williams
62 Sentencing (Livestock Rustling) Amendment Bill Ian McKelvie
63 Shop Trading Hours Act Repeal (Shopping Centre Opening Hours) Amendment Bill Hon Trevor Mallard
64 Social Security (Apprenticeship Assistance for Youth) Amendment Bill Grant Robertson
65 Social Security (Pathway to Work) Amendment Bill Carmel Sepuloni
66 Social Security (Stopping Benefit Payments for Offenders who Repeatedly Fail to Comply with Community Sentences) Amendment Bill Mark Mitchell
67 Summary Offences (Drink or Drugs Affecting Behaviour) Amendment Bill Clayton Mitchell
68 Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Amendment Bill Clare Curran
69 Vulnerable Children (Mandatory Social Worker Registration) Amendment Bill Ria Bond
70 Waitemata Harbour Protection Bill Rt Hon Winston Peters
71 Wildlife (Threatened Species Protection) Amendment Bill Kevin Hague

The bills by party (Ministers excluded) are:

  • National – 14/34
  • Labour – 30/32
  • Greens – 14/14
  • NZ First -12/12
  • Maori – 1/1
  • ACT – 0/1
  • Total – 71/94

If the other 20 National MPs got a bill in the ballot (or could get agreement of the hierarchy for their bills) then the chances of a non hostile bill being drawn would increase from 14/71 to 34/91 or from 20% to 37%.

Three new members’ bills

August 14th, 2015 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

Three bills were drawn from the ballot yesterday. They are:

Affordable Healthcare Bill by NZ First MP Barbara Stewart

The bill’s purpose is to encourage people to contribute to their own healthcare costs in a way that is consistent with supporting the public health system. It also makes health insurance a requirement for Parent Category visa applications. It proposes to require Parent Category migrants to have health insurance on arrival and to maintain it in New Zealand for 10 years; remove fringe benefit tax (FBT) from health insurance; and introduce the SuperGold health insurance premium rebate.

Electricity Industry (Small-Scale Renewable Distributed Generation) Amendment Bill by Green MP Gareth Hughes

This bill is intended to break down existing barriers and provide a fair regime for small-scale renewable electricity generators to encourage greater renewable distributed generation and to help New Zealand in meeting the goal of 90% renewable electricity by 2025.

Keep Kiwibank Bill by Labour MP Clayton Cosgrove

This purpose of this bill is to ensure that any proposal to partly or wholly privatise Kiwibank would require the support of 75% of all members of the House of Representatives or, alternatively, the support of a majority of voters in a referendum, in order to lawfully proceed.

 

Barbara Stewart’s bill has a mixture of good and bad. I think one can have a useful debate about who meets health costs of migrants who come in as parents of residents. Removing FBT from health insurance is a daft idea that will just lead to huge tax avoidance and the health premium rebate would be very costly to taxpayers. Overall I’d vote against this bill. If it was just the first part, I’d vote for it at first reading.

Gareth Hughes’ bill seems worth supporting at first reading. I’m not sure it will achieve a lot, but it looks like it could help solve a problem, without large unintended consequences. Not sure if it will be worth supporting all the way through, but at a minimum it deserves to go to select committee and have submissions on it. One of the more thoughtful opposition bills.

Clayton Cosgrove’s bill is a piece of ridiculous grandstanding that should be terminated on sight. It solves a non-existent problem with a constitutionally repugnant solution.

Members’ bills ballot, Thursday 13 August 2015

August 13th, 2015 at 10:00 am by David Farrar

With three members’ bills yesterday completing their first readings, that means another three get drawn from the ballot today. Those in the ballot as of late last night are:

 

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Bill Title Member Name
1 Accident Compensation (Recent Migrants and Returning New Zealanders) Amendment Bill Melissa Lee
2 Affordable Healthcare Bill Barbara Stewart
3 Age of Majority (Attainment at 18 Years) Amendment Bill Brett Hudson
4 Better Public Service Target Results Independent Audit Bill Darroch Ball
5 Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill Dr Jian Yang
6 Buy New Zealand (Procurement) Bill Richard Prosser
7 Charter Schools (Application of Official Information and Ombudsmen Acts) Bill Hon Nanaia Mahuta
8 Child Poverty Reduction and Eradication Bill Jacinda Ardern
9 Children, Young Persons, and Their Families (Parent’s and Guardian’s Responsibility) Amendment Bill Barbara Kuriger
10 Climate Change (Divestment from Fossil Fuels) Bill Dr Russel Norman
11 Commerce (Supermarket Adjudicator and Code of Conduct) Amendment Bill Mojo Mathers
12 Credit Contracts and Consumer Finance (Break Fees Disclosure) Amendment Bill Kanwaljit Singh Bakshi
13 Credit Reforms (Responsible Lending) Bill Kris Faafoi
14 Crimes (Corporate Manslaughter) Amendment Bill Hon Damien O’Connor
15 Crimes (Non-fatal Strangulation) Amendment Bill Kelvin Davis
16 Criminal Procedure (Removing Paedophile Name Suppression) Amendment Bill Pita Paraone
17 Crown Minerals (Protection of World Heritage Sites) Amendment Bill Hon Ruth Dyson
18 Customs and Excise (Prohibition of Imports Made by Slave Labour) Amendment Bill Peeni Henare
19 Domestic Violence—Victims’ Protection Bill Jan Logie
20 Education (Charter Schools Abolition) Amendment Bill Chris Hipkins
21 Education (Charter Schools Teacher Quality) Amendment Bill Hon Phil Goff
22 Education (Public Good not Profit from Charter Schools) Amendment Bill Dr David Clark
23 Education (Restoration of Democracy to University Councils) Amendment Bill Hon David Cunliffe
24 Electricity Industry (Energy Efficiency) Amendment Bill Rino Tirikatene
25 Electricity Industry (Small-Scale Renewable Distributed Generation) Amendment Bill Gareth Hughes
26 Electricity Transparency Bill David Shearer
27 Employment Relations (Allowing Higher Earners to Contract Out of Personal Grievance Provisions) Amendment Bill Scott Simpson
28 Employment Relations (Certainty at Work) Amendment Bill Iain Lees-Galloway
29 Employment Relations (Restoring Kiwis’ Right to a Break at Work) Amendment Bill Jenny Salesa
30 Employment Relations (Triangular Employment) Amendment Bill Stuart Nash
31 Energy Efficiency and Conservation (Warm Healthy Rentals Warrant of Fitness) Amendment Bill Metiria Turei
32 Environment Canterbury (Democracy Restoration) Amendment Bill Dr Megan Woods
33 Family Proceedings (Paternity Orders and Parentage Tests) Amendment Bill Jacqui Dean
34 Healthy Homes Guarantee Bill (No 2) Andrew Little
35 Immigration (Refugee Quota) Amendment Bill Denise Roche
36 Independent Prison Inspectorate Bill David Clendon
37 International Non-Aggression and Lawful Use of Force (Implementation of Amendment to Statute of Rome) Bill Dr Kennedy Graham
38 Keep Kiwibank Bill Hon Clayton Cosgrove
39 Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary Establishment Bill Eugenie Sage
40 Kiwi Jobs Bill Sue Moroney
41 Land Transfer (Foreign Ownership of Land Register) Amendment Bill Mahesh Bindra
42 Land Transport (Tourist Driver Rental Vehicle) Amendment Bill Denis O’Rourke
43 Land Transport (Vulnerable Road Users) Amendment Bill Julie Anne Genter
44 Legislation (Climate Impact Disclosure Statement) Amendment Bill James Shaw
45 Life Jackets for Children and Young Persons Bill Alfred Ngaro
46 Local Government (Four Well-beings) Amendment Bill Su’a William Sio
47 Local Government (Freedom of Access) Amendment Bill Paul Foster-Bell
48 Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill Joanne Hayes
49 Nurse Practitioners Bill Hon Annette King
50 Oaths and Declarations (Endorsing the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi) Amendment Bill Marama Fox
51 Oaths and Declarations (Members of Parliament) Amendment Bill Meka Whaitiri
52 Overseas Investment (Protection of New Zealand Homebuyers) Amendment Bill Phil Twyford
53 Private International Law (Choice of Law in Tort) Bill David Bennett
54 Prostitution Reform (Regulate Street Prostitution) Amendment Bill Tracey Martin
55 Public Finance (Sustainable Development Indicators) Amendment Bill Steffan Browning
56 Public Works (Prohibition of Compulsory Acquisition of Māori Land) Amendment Bill Catherine Delahunty
57 Radiocommunications (Enhanced Public Broadcasting Provision) Amendment Bill Adrian Rurawhe
58 Receiverships (Agricultural Debt Mediation) Amendment Bill Ron Mark
59 Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Renewal of Licences) Amendment Bill Louisa Wall
60 Sentencing (Domestic Violence) Amendment Bill Poto Williams
61 Sentencing (Livestock Rustling) Amendment Bill Ian McKelvie
62 Shop Trading Hours Act Repeal (Shopping Centre Opening Hours) Amendment Bill Hon Trevor Mallard
63 Social Security (Apprenticeship Assistance for Youth) Amendment Bill Grant Robertson
64 Social Security (Pathway to Work) Amendment Bill Carmel Sepuloni
65 Social Security (Stopping Benefit Payments for Offenders who Repeatedly Fail to Comply with Community Sentences) Amendment Bill Mark Mitchell
66 Summary Offences (Drink or Drugs Affecting Behaviour) Amendment Bill Clayton Mitchell
67 Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Amendment Bill Clare Curran
68 Vulnerable Children (Mandatory Social Worker Registration) Amendment Bill Ria Bond
69 Waitemata Harbour Protection Bill Rt Hon Winston Peters
70 Wildlife (Threatened Species Protection) Amendment Bill Kevin Hague

The bills by party (Ministers excluded) are:

  • National – 13/34
  • Labour – 31/32
  • Greens – 14/14
  • NZ First -11/12
  • Maori – 1/1
  • ACT – 0/1

If the other 21 National MPs got a bill in the ballot (or could get agreement of the hierarchy for their bills) then the chances of a non hostile bill being drawn would increase from 13/70 to 34/91 or from 19% to 37%.

Results of Members’ bills ballot, Thursday 23 July 2015

July 23rd, 2015 at 12:31 pm by David Farrar

The four bills drawn are all from Labour MPs. They are:

  1. Parental Leave and Employment Protection (Six Months’ Paid Leave and Work Contact Hours) Amendment Bill Sue Moroney
  2. Education (Charter Schools Curriculum) Amendment Bill Hon Phil Goff
  3. Social Workers Registration (Mandatory Registration) Amendment Bill Carmel Sepuloni
  4. Official Information (Parliamentary Under-Secretaries) Amendment Bill Adrian Rurawhe

Parental Leave and Employment Protection (Six Months’ Paid Leave and Work Contact Hours) Amendment Bill

This bill extends paid parental leave to 26 weeks and adds provisions around work contact hours, where working parents are entitled to the flexibility of returning to work for a certain amount of time during the parental leave period without losing their entitlement to paid parental leave.

Note that the Government has already increased the duration of leave from 14 weeks to 18 weeks. This bill is unlikely to progress unless United Future support it.

Education (Charter Schools Curriculum) Amendment Bill

This Bill would requiring partnership schools kura hourua (“charter schools”) to teach the NZ curriculum.

This undermines the whole idea of charter schools having flexibility (like private schools) and is unlikely to be supported.

Social Workers Registration (Mandatory Registration) Amendment Bill

This Bill implements recommendations made to the Minister for Social Development by the Social Workers Registration Board to provide for the current voluntary system of registration for practising social workers to become a mandatory system.

I think this bill is worth supporting at least through first reading.

Official Information (Parliamentary Under-Secretaries) Amendment Bill

This Bill would ensure that information held by Parliamentary Under-Secretaries in their official capacity is official information, and subject to the Official Information Act 1982.

I support this bill and think it should be passed.

Members’ bills ballot, Thursday 23 July 2015

July 23rd, 2015 at 8:24 am by David Farrar

With four members’ bills yesterday completing their first readings, that means another four get drawn from the ballot today. Those in the ballot as of late last night are:

 

Bill Title Member Name
1 Accident Compensation (Recent Migrants and Returning New Zealanders) Amendment Bill Melissa Lee
2 Affordable Healthcare Bill Barbara Stewart
3 Age of Majority (Attainment at 18 Years) Amendment Bill Brett Hudson
4 Better Public Service Target Results Independent Audit Bill Tracey Martin
5 Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill Dr Jian Yang
6 Buy New Zealand (Procurement) Bill Richard Prosser
7 Care of Children (Adoption and Surrogacy Law Reform) Amendment Bill Kevin Hague
8 Charter Schools (Application of Official Information and Ombudsmen Acts) Bill Hon Nanaia Mahuta
9 Child Poverty Reduction and Eradication Bill Jacinda Ardern
10 Children, Young Persons, and Their Families (Parent’s and Guardian’s Responsibility) Amendment Bill Barbara Kuriger
11 Climate Change (Divestment from Fossil Fuels) Bill Dr Russel Norman
12 Commerce (Supermarket Adjudicator and Code of Conduct) Amendment Bill Mojo Mathers
13 Credit Contracts and Consumer Finance (Break Fees Disclosure) Amendment Bill Kanwaljit Singh Bakshi
14 Crimes (Corporate Manslaughter) Amendment Bill Hon Damien O’Connor
15 Crimes (Non-fatal Strangulation) Amendment Bill Kelvin Davis
16 Criminal Procedure (Removing Paedophile Name Suppression) Amendment Bill Pita Paraone
17 Crown Minerals (Protection of World Heritage Sites) Amendment Bill Hon Ruth Dyson
18 Customs and Excise (Prohibition of Imports Made by Slave Labour) Amendment Bill Peeni Henare
19 Domestic Violence—Victims’ Protection Bill Jan Logie
20 Education (Charter Schools Abolition) Amendment Bill Chris Hipkins
21 Education (Charter Schools Curriculum) Amendment Bill Hon Phil Goff
22 Education (Charter Schools Teacher Quality) Amendment Bill Louisa Wall
23 Education (Public Good not Profit from Charter Schools) Amendment Bill Dr David Clark
24 Education (Restoration of Democracy to University Councils) Amendment Bill Hon David Cunliffe
25 Electricity Industry (Energy Efficiency) Amendment Bill Rino Tirikatene
26 Electricity Industry (Small-Scale Renewable Distributed Generation) Amendment Bill Gareth Hughes
27 Electricity Transparency Bill David Shearer
28 Employment Relations (Allowing Higher Earners to Contract Out of Personal Grievance Provisions) Amendment Bill Scott Simpson
29 Employment Relations (Certainty at Work) Amendment Bill Iain Lees-Galloway
30 Employment Relations (Restoring Kiwis’ Right to a Break at Work) Amendment Bill Jenny Salesa
31 Energy Efficiency and Conservation (Warm Healthy Rentals Warrant of Fitness) Amendment Bill Metiria Turei
32 Environment Canterbury (Democracy Restoration) Amendment Bill Dr Megan Woods
33 Family Proceedings (Paternity Orders and Parentage Tests) Amendment Bill Jacqui Dean
34 Healthy Homes Guarantee Bill (No 2) Andrew Little
35 Immigration (Refugee Quota) Amendment Bill Denise Roche
36 Independent Prison Inspectorate Bill David Clendon
37 International Non-Aggression and Lawful Use of Force (Implementation of Amendment to Statute of Rome) Bill Dr Kennedy Graham
38 Keep Kiwibank Bill Hon Clayton Cosgrove
39 Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary Establishment Bill Eugenie Sage
40 Land Transfer (Foreign Ownership of Land Register) Amendment Bill Mahesh Bindra
41 Land Transport (Vulnerable Road Users) Amendment Bill Julie Anne Genter
42 Legislation (Climate Impact Disclosure Statement) Amendment Bill James Shaw
43 Life Jackets for Children and Young Persons Bill Alfred Ngaro
44 Local Government (Four Well-beings) Amendment Bill Su’a William Sio
45 Local Government (Freedom of Access) Amendment Bill Paul Foster-Bell
46 Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill Joanne Hayes
47 Nurse Practitioners Bill Hon Annette King
48 Oaths and Declarations (Endorsing the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi) Amendment Bill Marama Fox
49 Oaths and Declarations (Members of Parliament) Amendment Bill Meka Whaitiri
50 Official Information (Parliamentary Under-Secretaries) Amendment Bill Adrian Rurawhe
51 Overseas Investment (Protection of New Zealand Homebuyers) Amendment Bill Phil Twyford
52 Parental Leave and Employment Protection (Six Months’ Paid Leave and Work Contact Hours) Amendment Bill Sue Moroney
53 Private International Law (Choice of Law in Tort) Bill David Bennett
54 Public Finance (Sustainable Development Indicators) Amendment Bill Steffan Browning
55 Public Works (Prohibition of Compulsory Acquisition of Māori Land) Amendment Bill Catherine Delahunty
56 Radiocommunications (Enhanced Public Broadcasting Provision) Amendment Bill Kris Faafoi
57 Receiverships (Agricultural Debt Mediation) Amendment Bill Ron Mark
58 Sentencing (Domestic Violence) Amendment Bill Poto Williams
59 Sentencing (Livestock Rustling) Amendment Bill Ian McKelvie
60 Shop Trading Hours Act Repeal (Shopping Centre Opening Hours) Amendment Bill Hon Trevor Mallard
61 Social Security (Apprenticeship Assistance for Youth) Amendment Bill Grant Robertson
62 Social Security (Pathway to Work) Amendment Bill Stuart Nash
63 Social Security (Stopping Benefit Payments for Offenders who Repeatedly Fail to Comply with Community Sentences) Amendment Bill Mark Mitchell
64 Social Workers Registration (Mandatory Registration) Amendment Bill Carmel Sepuloni
65 Summary Offences (Drink or Drugs Affecting Behaviour) Amendment Bill Clayton Mitchell
66 Summary Proceedings (Warrant for Detention Conditions) Amendment Bill Jonathan Young
67 Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Amendment Bill Clare Curran
68 Vulnerable Children (Mandatory Social Worker Registration) Amendment Bill Ria Bond
69 Waitemata Harbour Protection Bill Rt Hon Winston Peters

The bills by party (Ministers excluded) are:

  • National – 14/34
  • Labour – 32/32
  • Greens – 14/14
  • NZ First -8/12
  • Maori – 1/1
  • ACT – 0/1

If the other 20 National MPs got a bill in the ballot (or could get agreement of the hierarchy for their bills) then the chances of a non hostile bill being drawn would increase from 14/69 to 34/89 or from 20% to 38%.

Four new members’ bills

June 26th, 2015 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

Four bills were drawn from the ballot yesterday. They are:

Local Government Act 2002 (Greater Local Democracy) Amendment Bill – Labour MP Stuart Nash

This bill would mean any poll on amalgamations of local government will be unsuccessful unless it gains not just a majority over the affected area, but also a majority in each and every district within.

Public Collections and Solicitations (Disclosure of Payment) Bill – National MP Matt Doocey

This would require people soliciting donations, signatures or the like to disclose whether they are paid collectors.

Financial Assistance for Live Organ Donors Bill – National MP Chris Bishop

This would allow people who can not work due to having donated organs, to get income assistance equivalent to ACC (80% of lost earnings) for a maximum of 12 weeks, compared to the current sickness benefit only.

New Zealand Superannuation and Retirement Income (Pro Rata Entitlement) Amendment Bill – NZ First MP Denis O’Rourke.

This would reduce the level of NZ Superannuation on a pro-rata basis to people who have not been or remained in NZ between the ages of 20 and 65.

My thoughts on each are:

  • Nash bill – just seeks to reverse a law change from a few years ago. Would vote against at first reading
  • Doocey bill – a useful concept and enhanced transparency is good but current wording may be too draconian. Support at first reading, and review after select committee
  • Bishop bill – strongly support
  • O’Rourke bill – is worth having a debate on the issue, and the principle of less NZ Super for those who spent less time in NZ is not a bad one. But don’t want to punish people for doing their OE for a few years. Worth supporting at first reading to get submissions

Members’ bill ballot 25 June 2015

June 25th, 2015 at 10:16 am by David Farrar

There will be a whopping four bills drawn from the ballot of 73 at midday today. Bills in the ballot are:

  Bill Title Member Name
1 Accident Compensation (Recent Migrants and Returning New Zealanders) Amendment Bill Melissa Lee
2 Affordable Healthcare Bill Barbara Stewart
3 Age of Majority (Attainment at 18 Years) Amendment Bill Brett Hudson
4 Better Public Service Target Results Independent Audit Bill Tracey Martin
5 Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill Dr Jian Yang
6 Buy New Zealand (Procurement) Bill Richard Prosser
7 Care of Children (Adoption and Surrogacy Law Reform) Amendment Bill Kevin Hague
8 Charter Schools (Application of Official Information and Ombudsmen Acts) Bill Hon Nanaia Mahuta
9 Child Poverty Reduction and Eradication Bill Jacinda Ardern
10 Children, Young Persons, and Their Families (Parent’s and Guardian’s Responsibility) Amendment Bill Barbara Kuriger
11 Climate Change (Divestment from Fossil Fuels) Bill Dr Russel Norman
12 Commerce (Supermarket Adjudicator and Code of Conduct) Amendment Bill Steffan Browning
13 Credit Contracts and Consumer Finance (Break Fees Disclosure) Amendment Bill Kanwaljit Singh Bakshi
14 Crimes (Corporate Manslaughter) Amendment Bill Hon Damien O’Connor
15 Crimes (Non-fatal Strangulation) Amendment Bill Kelvin Davis
16 Criminal Procedure (Removing Paedophile Name Suppression) Amendment Bill Pita Paraone
17 Crown Minerals (Protection of World Heritage Sites) Amendment Bill Hon Ruth Dyson
18 Customs and Excise (Prohibition of Imports Made by Slave Labour) Amendment Bill Peeni Henare
19 Domestic Violence—Victims’ Protection Bill Jan Logie
20 Education (Charter Schools Abolition) Amendment Bill Chris Hipkins
21 Education (Charter Schools Curriculum) Amendment Bill Hon Phil Goff
22 Education (Charter Schools Teacher Quality) Amendment Bill Louisa Wall
23 Education (Public Good not Profit from Charter Schools) Amendment Bill Dr David Clark
24 Education (Restoration of Democracy to University Councils) Amendment Bill Hon David Cunliffe
25 Electricity Industry (Energy Efficiency) Amendment Bill Rino Tirikatene
26 Electricity Industry (Small-Scale Renewable Distributed Generation) Amendment Bill Gareth Hughes
27 Electricity Transparency Bill David Shearer
28 Employment Relations (Allowing Higher Earners to Contract Out of Personal Grievance Provisions) Amendment Bill Scott Simpson
29 Employment Relations (Certainty at Work) Amendment Bill Iain Lees-Galloway
30 Employment Relations (Restoring Kiwis’ Right to a Break at Work) Amendment Bill Jenny Salesa
31 Employment Relations (Safe and Healthy Workplaces) Amendment Bill Alastair Scott
32 Energy Efficiency and Conservation (Warm Healthy Rentals Warrant of Fitness) Amendment Bill Metiria Turei
33 Environment Canterbury (Democracy Restoration) Amendment Bill Dr Megan Woods
34 Equal Pay Amendment Bill Mojo Mathers
35 Family Proceedings (Paternity Orders and Parentage Tests) Amendment Bill Jacqui Dean
36 Financial Assistance for Live Organ Donors Bill Chris Bishop
37 Healthy Homes Guarantee Bill (No 2) Andrew Little
38 Immigration (Refugee Quota) Amendment Bill Denise Roche
39 Independent Prison Inspectorate Bill David Clendon
40 International Non-Aggression and Lawful Use of Force (Implementation of Amendment to Statute of Rome) Bill Dr Kennedy Graham
41 Keep Kiwibank Bill Hon Clayton Cosgrove
42 Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary Establishment Bill Eugenie Sage
43 Land Transfer (Foreign Ownership of Land Register) Amendment Bill Mahesh Bindra
44 Land Transport (Vulnerable Road Users) Amendment Bill Julie Anne Genter
45 Legislation (Climate Impact Disclosure Statement) Amendment Bill James Shaw
46 Life Jackets for Children and Young Persons Bill Alfred Ngaro
47 Local Government (Four Well-beings) Amendment Bill Su’a William Sio
48 Local Government (Freedom of Access) Amendment Bill Paul Foster-Bell
49 Local Government Act 2002 (Greater Local Democracy) Amendment Bill Stuart Nash
50 Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill Joanne Hayes
51 New Zealand Superannuation and Retirement Income (Pro Rata Entitlement) Amendment Bill Denis O’Rourke
52 Nurse Practitioners Bill Hon Annette King
53 Oaths and Declarations (Endorsing the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi) Amendment Bill Marama Fox
54 Oaths and Declarations (Members of Parliament) Amendment Bill Meka Whaitiri
55 Official Information (Parliamentary Under-Secretaries) Amendment Bill Adrian Rurawhe
56 Overseas Investment (Protection of New Zealand Homebuyers) Amendment Bill Phil Twyford
57 Parental Leave and Employment Protection (Six Months’ Paid Leave and Work Contact Hours) Amendment Bill Sue Moroney
58 Private International Law (Choice of Law in Tort) Bill David Bennett
59 Public Collections and Solicitations (Disclosure of Payment) Bill Matt Doocey
60 Public Works (Prohibition of Compulsory Acquisition of Māori Land) Amendment Bill Catherine Delahunty
61 Radiocommunications (Enhanced Public Broadcasting Provision) Amendment Bill Kris Faafoi
62 Receiverships (Agricultural Debt Mediation) Amendment Bill Ron Mark
63 Sentencing (Domestic Violence) Amendment Bill Poto Williams
64 Sentencing (Livestock Rustling) Amendment Bill Ian McKelvie
65 Shop Trading Hours Act Repeal (Shopping Centre Opening Hours) Amendment Bill Hon Trevor Mallard
66 Social Security (Apprenticeship Assistance for Youth) Amendment Bill Grant Robertson
67 Social Security (Stopping Benefit Payments for Offenders who Repeatedly Fail to Comply with Community Sentences) Amendment Bill Mark Mitchell
68 Social Workers Registration (Mandatory Registration) Amendment Bill Carmel Sepuloni
69 Summary Offences (Drink or Drugs Affecting Behaviour) Amendment Bill Clayton Mitchell
70 Summary Proceedings (Warrant for Detention Conditions) Amendment Bill Jonathan Young
71 Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Amendment Bill Clare Curran
72 Vulnerable Children (Mandatory Social Worker Registration) Amendment Bill Ria Bond
73 Waitemata Harbour Protection Bill Rt Hon Winston Peters

Members’ Bills Ballot 4 June 2015

June 4th, 2015 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

As a members’ bill was passed last night, there will be a ballot today for a new bill to be introduced. The draw is at midday.

Below are the bills in the ballot currently. I’ll update after midday with the winner.

Bill Title Member Name
1 Affordable Healthcare Bill Barbara Stewart
2 Age of Majority (Attainment at 18 Years) Amendment Bill Brett Hudson
3 Better Public Service Target Results Independent Audit Bill Tracey Martin
4 Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill Dr Jian Yang
5 Buy New Zealand (Procurement) Bill Richard Prosser
6 Care of Children (Adoption and Surrogacy Law Reform) Amendment Bill Kevin Hague
7 Charter Schools (Application of Official Information and Ombudsmen Acts) Bill Hon Nanaia Mahuta
8 Child Poverty Reduction and Eradication Bill Jacinda Ardern
9 Children, Young Persons, and Their Families (Parent’s and Guardian’s Responsibility) Amendment Bill Barbara Kuriger
10 Climate Change (Divestment from Fossil Fuels) Bill Dr Russel Norman
11 Climate Change Response (National Emissions Reduction) Amendment Bill Julie Anne Genter
12 Commerce (Supermarket Adjudicator and Code of Conduct) Amendment Bill Steffan Browning
13 Credit Contracts and Consumer Finance (Break Fees Disclosure) Amendment Bill Kanwaljit Singh Bakshi
14 Crimes (Corporate Manslaughter) Amendment Bill Andrew Little
15 Crimes (Non-fatal Strangulation) Amendment Bill Kelvin Davis
16 Criminal Procedure (Removing Paedophile Name Suppression) Amendment Bill Pita Paraone
17 Crown Minerals (Protection of World Heritage Sites) Amendment Bill Hon Ruth Dyson
18 Customs and Excise (Prohibition of Imports Made by Slave Labour) Amendment Bill Peeni Henare
19 Domestic Violence—Victims’ Protection Bill Jan Logie
20 Education (Charter Schools Abolition) Amendment Bill Chris Hipkins
21 Education (Charter Schools Curriculum) Amendment Bill Hon Phil Goff
22 Education (Charter Schools Teacher Quality) Amendment Bill Louisa Wall
23 Education (Public Good not Profit from Charter Schools) Amendment Bill Dr David Clark
24 Education (Restoration of Democracy to University Councils) Amendment Bill Hon David Cunliffe
25 Electricity Industry (Energy Efficiency) Amendment Bill Rino Tirikatene
26 Electricity Industry (Small-Scale Renewable Distributed Generation) Amendment Bill Gareth Hughes
27 Electricity Transparency Bill David Shearer
28 Employment Relations (Allowing Higher Earners to Contract Out of Personal Grievance Provisions) Amendment Bill Scott Simpson
29 Employment Relations (Certainty at Work) Amendment Bill Iain Lees-Galloway
30 Employment Relations (Restoring Kiwis’ Right to a Break at Work) Amendment Bill Jenny Salesa
31 Employment Relations (Safe and Healthy Workplaces) Amendment Bill Alastair Scott
32 Energy Efficiency and Conservation (Warm Healthy Rentals Warrant of Fitness) Amendment Bill Metiria Turei
33 Environment Canterbury (Democracy Restoration) Amendment Bill Dr Megan Woods
34 Equal Pay Amendment Bill Mojo Mathers
35 Family Proceedings (Paternity Orders and Parentage Tests) Amendment Bill Jacqui Dean
36 Financial Assistance for Live Organ Donors Bill Chris Bishop
37 Independent Prison Inspectorate Bill David Clendon
38 International Non-Aggression and the Lawful Use of Force Bill Dr Kennedy Graham
39 Keep Kiwibank Bill Hon Clayton Cosgrove
40 Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary Establishment Bill Eugenie Sage
41 Kiwi Jobs Bill Hon Damien O’Connor
42 Land Transfer (Foreign Ownership of Land Register) Amendment Bill Mahesh Bindra
43 Life Jackets for Children and Young Persons Bill Alfred Ngaro
44 Local Government (Four Well-beings) Amendment Bill Su’a William Sio
45 Local Government (Freedom of Access) Amendment Bill Paul Foster-Bell
46 Local Government Act 2002 (Greater Local Democracy) Amendment Bill Stuart Nash
47 Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill Joanne Hayes
48 Minimum Wage (Contractor Remuneration) Amendment Bill Hon David Parker
49 New Zealand Public Health and Disability (Change of Electoral System for District Health Boards) Amendment Bill Simon O’Connor
50 New Zealand Superannuation and Retirement Income (Pro Rata Entitlement) Amendment Bill Denis O’Rourke
51 Nurse Practitioners Bill Hon Annette King
52 Oaths and Declarations (Endorsing the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi) Amendment Bill Marama Fox
53 Oaths and Declarations (Members of Parliament) Amendment Bill Meka Whaitiri
54 Official Information (Parliamentary Under-Secretaries) Amendment Bill Adrian Rurawhe
55 Overseas Investment (Protection of New Zealand Homebuyers) Amendment Bill Phil Twyford
56 Parental Leave and Employment Protection (Six Months’ Paid Leave and Work Contact Hours) Amendment Bill Sue Moroney
57 Private International Law (Choice of Law in Tort) Bill David Bennett
58 Public Collections and Solicitations (Disclosure of Payment) Bill Matt Doocey
59 Public Finance (Sustainable Development Indicators) Amendment Bill James Shaw
60 Public Works (Prohibition of Compulsory Acquisition of Māori Land) Amendment Bill Catherine Delahunty
61 Radiocommunications (Enhanced Public Broadcasting Provision) Amendment Bill Kris Faafoi
62 Receiverships (Agricultural Debt Mediation) Amendment Bill Ron Mark
63 Sentencing (Domestic Violence) Amendment Bill Poto Williams
64 Sentencing (Livestock Rustling) Amendment Bill Ian McKelvie
65 Shop Trading Hours Act Repeal (Shopping Centre Opening Hours) Amendment Bill Hon Trevor Mallard
66 Social Security (Apprenticeship Assistance for Youth) Amendment Bill Grant Robertson
67 Social Security (Pathway to Work) Amendment Bill Carmel Sepuloni
68 Social Security (Stopping Benefit Payments for Offenders who Repeatedly Fail to Comply with Community Sentences) Amendment Bill Mark Mitchell
69 Summary Offences (Drink or Drugs Affecting Behaviour) Amendment Bill Clayton Mitchell
70 Summary Proceedings (Warrant for Detention Conditions) Amendment Bill Jonathan Young
71 Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Amendment Bill Clare Curran
72 Vulnerable Children (Mandatory Social Worker Registration) Amendment Bill Darroch Ball
73 Waitemata Harbour Protection Bill Rt Hon Winston Peters
74 Waste Minimisation (Television Product Stewardship) Amendment Bill Denise Roche

The bills by party (Ministers excluded) are:

  • National – 17/34
  • Labour – 32/32
  • Greens – 14/14
  • NZ First -10/12
  • Maori – 1/1
  • ACT – 0/1

Only half the National backbench have a bill in the ballot. That’s pretty slack.

Three silly bills

March 19th, 2015 at 4:00 pm by David Farrar

Some members bills are very good. But none of them got drawn from the ballot today.

No Right Turn reports:

A ballot for three Members bills was held today and the following bills were drawn:

 

These are all rather silly backwards looking bills.

The first one complains that the Environment Protection Authority is not required to protect the environment. This flies in the face of the reality that the EPA has declined almost all the major off shore projects before it on environmental grounds. This is a bill to fix a problem that does not exist.

NZ First want to have a second vote on a law that has already been passed. Considering that we have avoided any injection of taxpayer funds into the convention centre, their timing is pretty bad for them.

And the third bill is the most stupid. It would, if retrospective, force NZ to withdraw from basically every international trade agreement we have ever signed, pull out of the WTO, and never take part in any future trade deals. And NZ First claims to be pro-exporters!

I predict all three bills will fail to get past first reading.

Stopping the double dippers

March 4th, 2014 at 3:00 pm by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

MP Maggie Barry is labelling a Shore politician’s claims she is trying to remove him from office as “ridiculous”.

But Devonport-Takapuna Local Board member Grant Gillon says it’s no conspiracy theory.

Ms Barry, National MP for North Shore, had her bill to stop people serving on two or more Auckland local boards drawn from the member’s bill ballot.

Very sensible. You can’t be the MP for Wellington Central and say the MP for Mana. Your job is to represent one locality.

Among the few politicians this would affect is Mr Gillon who serves on both Devonport-Takapuna and Kaipatiki local boards.

Mr Gillon believes it’s motivated by his support for stopping housing at Bayswater Marina and opposition to closing Takapuna Beach Holiday Park to make way for a national sailing centre.

“There can be no other reason why the local MP considers removing me from office as the most important issue for the North Shore in an election year.”

He says the bill is poorly drafted and will force at least six costly by-elections across Auckland.

There is an SOP with the bill to clarify it is not retrospective. There will be no by-elections. The issue is whether politicians such as Gillon should be allowed to serve on two or more local boards concurrently.

Ms Barry says double dipping opens up the “real potential for conflicts of interest”.

“This has allowed local board power to be concentrated in the hands of a few people, many of whom don’t even live in the area they represent.”

The idea of local boards is that they are, well local.

Parental responsibility

January 13th, 2014 at 2:00 pm by David Farrar

The Herald reports:

The parents or guardians of young people before the courts could have bail conditions imposed on them as well as their children, such as not drinking alcohol and having to reside at a particular address, under a private members’ bill in the name of Northland MP Mike Sabin.

I’d be cautious about this.

In many cases of a wayward youth, the parents are a contributing factor. But equally, there are some kids who go off the tracks despite the best parenting and family support possible. Having parents share some liability for what their kids do could set a dangerous precedent.

The Children, Young Persons and Their Families (Parent’s and Guardian’s Responsibility) Amendment Bill would allow the Youth Court to set bail conditions for parents and guardians in a bid to prevent re-offending.

Mr Sabin believed at least half of the responsibility for youth offending was down to adults making sure their children were being properly supervised.

Mr Sabin’s bills have been approved by the National Party caucus for support at first reading should any be drawn from the ballot.

I think it is a worthy debate to have, and if it goes to select committee, would be a good forum for hearing that debate. But the possible precedent does concern me.

Goldsmith bill on personal grievances

November 15th, 2013 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

Audrey Young at NZ Herald reports:

Executives who are fired from their companies would be less likely to get excessive golden handshakes under a private member’s bill being promoted by National list MP Paul Goldsmith.

And employers would be less willing to put up with high-paid staff not doing their jobs properly.

But it appears that Mr Goldsmith would have more chance of his bill being passed under a Labour-led Government than the National-led one.

Mr Goldsmith is proposing that employees with salary packages worth more than $150,000 not have the automatic right to a personal grievance, which they have under present employment law.

This is a very commendable bill. It doesn’t mean that employees over $150,000 will not have access to employment law. It means that they can contract out of it. And it is hard to argue that someone earning $150,000 is a vulnerable worker who needs protection.

They will still have access to general contract law, and can sue for breach of contract.

Under the current law, even if an employee is paid out under the terms of his or her contract, they can still take a personal grievance case to try to get a higher payout.

Mr Goldsmith says that means that employers are more likely to put up with someone who is not doing the job well or “make a more generous golden handshake to make the problem go away”.

He said he had been approached by business, and small business in particular, who saw it as a problem.

His bill did not go as far as Australian law which automatically exempts a high-paid employee (earning over A$129,000) from being able to take a personal grievance.

The Goldsmith bill just allows a high earning employee and an employer to sign a contract that limits personal grievances. So it might just say that in the event of an inability to work together, the employee will get paid x weeks salary.

The bill has been put into the private member’s ballot. Labour Minister Simon Bridges said while National supported the proposed bill, the Government would prefer to get officials’ advice.

But Labour’s labour spokesman, Andrew Little, said last night that it was the sort of thing a Labour-led Government would be keen to look at, especially for chief executives.

He had a concern with the $150,000 threshold because it could include highly skilled engineers, for example, working for companies such as Fonterra, who were well down the chain of command and control over the company.

Subject to a discussion about the threshold, he agreed with the bill in principle and thought Labour would support it to select committee.

The threshold seems right to me. It isn’t about the job title. Andrew seems concerned that it might impact some EPMU members, but if an engineer is earning over $150,000 they seem pretty capable of negotiating a good contract.

Labour says no need for consensus on electoral reform

November 15th, 2013 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

 

A bill that would lower the threshold for minor parties to enter Parliament and “put an end to tea party-style stitch-ups” has been drawn from the ballot.

 

Labour MP Iain Lees-Galloway said the bill lowered the party-vote threshold from 5 per cent to 4 per cent and removed the coat-tail provision that allowed major parties to do deals with minor ones to help them into Parliament.

 

The Palmerston North MP’s Electoral (Adjustment of Thresholds) Amendment Bill was pulled from Parliament’s ballot today and seeks to implement the recommendations of the Electoral Commission review held after the MMP referendum.

Personally I support changing the thresholds, and my submission said so. But these sort of significant changes should only occur if there is consensus between the more significant political parties. The Electoral Act should not be some sort of grand prize which winning parties use to screw over losing parties, to try and stay in power longer – which is what Labour did last time. National has deliberately refrained from making significant changes to electoral law, if Labour doesn’t agree with them. The idea is to maintain that consensus, but it looks like Labour are ditching the need for consensus:

Lees-Galloway acknowledged he would probably struggle to get support for the bill.

“There’s no need for consensus here. Political parties just need to vote according to what they think is right,” he said

So who knows what changes to electoral law we’ll see if Labour wins.

It is worth noting that this bill does not implement the recommendations of the Electoral Commission in full. It cherry picks the recommendations they agree with, but doesn’t implement the recommendation to get rid of overhang seats or setting a ratio of electorate to list seats.

By not getting rid of over-hangs, Labour’s bill would have seen the size of Parliament in the last three elections as 127 MPs, 128 MPs and 126 MPs.

 

The Care of Children Law Reform Bill debate

October 24th, 2013 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

The House debated last night Jacinda Ardern’s Care of Children Law Reform Bill. Despite the fact that most parties and MPs agree adoption laws need to be reformed, the House voted down the bill because it was so lightweight. As I blogged last May, it was basically a press release pretending to be a bill. It did nothing except ask the Law Commission to write a bill, and require the Minister of Justice to introduce it.

One Minister has said that the bill basically meant handing over most of the powers of Parliament and the Cabinet/Executive to Wayne Mapp! (Dr Mapp is a Law Commissioner).

The debate is in the draft Hansard transcript:

JACINDA ARDERN (Labour):  It makes sense that as Parliament we make use of the expertise of the Law Commission and the work that has already been done. Doing so would be an unusual practice, though, and I do acknowledge that. Embedding this process into a member’s bill is, however, a very, very unique approach, but, as I have said, given that this work is so overdue, anything that can help us speed up reform in this area surely must be welcomed.

The problem is that the bill doesn’t speed up reform. It would mean an actual law reform bill would not be considered by Parliament for two to three years.

SCOTT SIMPSON (National—Coromandel): The sponsor of this Care of Children Law Reform Bill, Jacinda Ardern, has nominated the Justice and Electoral Committee to scrutinise the bill should it pass this first reading. Therefore, as chairman of the committee, it falls to me to have a first go at what can only really be described as a very sloppy and lazy member’s bill by this member. …

But I am very aware that in contrast to this once-over-lightly bill that is being presented by Ms Ardern, the Green MP Kevin Hague has actually done a very significant and substantial piece of work and has a bill in the ballot on this very matter. His bill remains in the ballot. It is a hugely complex area. It is emotional and it has huge impacts on people’s lives. Just identifying the key policy issues is itself quite a task, but if Jacinda Ardern genuinely wants to make a real contribution to serious and meaningful law reform in this area, then she needs to put in a bit of serious work. This bill that she has put forward is basically little more than a legislative request for the Government to do something. It is not a solution; it is not even an attempt at a solution. 

Hague’s bill is 18,000 words of legislation which covers around a dozen different policy areas. It is a very serious piece of law reform, which if drawn from the ballot could see a new law in less than a year.

The first major flaw with this very sloppily drafted piece of legislation is that if passed, under this bill there would probably be no law change for at least 4 years or more. And let us just have a look at the likely timings. A select committee would take about 6 months or more to give this member’s bill consideration, given the looming summer break ahead of us. Then there would need to be a second and third reading—that would easily take a further 3 months or more. Then the Law Commission itself would need to draft its report, and that would take at least a year—probably longer. Then, of course, once it came back from the Law Commission under instruction, the Government bill would have to be first read and scheduled, and that could take up to another 12 months. Then there would be a select committee process; that would be another 6 months or more. Then there would be a second and a third reading, and at least another 3 months after that. So the problem is that the member sponsoring this bill is essentially trying to use her member’s bill to get the Law Commission to write her bill for her. That is sloppy. That is lazy. It is a lazy approach. It is politically lazy—it is politically lazy—and it is intellectually lazy.

It is an NCEA not achieved.

The second flaw with this bill is that it does not actually specify a single policy principle—not one. It does not identify a single policy principle. It actually gives no direction at all to the Law Commission as to what should be in the bill or what its scope should be. The bill does not even indicate whether it should discriminate against same-sex relationships. Every single detail is left to the Law Commission. It would effectively give the Law Commission a blank piece of paper. It is a constitutional affront to this House and to the members who sit in this House.

The lack of detail is also a killer.

It is very easy to write a nine-clause bill and trumpet that as some kind of solution, claiming that it would address a wide range of concerns about the outdated Adoption Act. But, sadly for the member sponsoring this bill, lawmaking is not that simple; nor is it that easy, and it absolutely should not be. If she wants to do some serious work, then she should put in the hard work. She should put some intellectual grunt into it and actually apply her not insubstantial brain to the matter at hand and actually proffer a solution—she should actually proffer a solution. So simply drafting this bill and asking someone else to do the job for you is a lazy way of ensuring that a prospective glittering political career falls in the dustbin. The National Government MPs will be opposing this bill. It is a sloppy, lazy piece of legislation, and it deserves to be consigned to the legislative rubbish bin.

A somewhat harsh speech, but not inaccurate. And it wasn’t just National voting against. The Greens did also:

METIRIA TUREI (Co-Leader—Green): The member Jacinda Ardern announced her intention to place this bill in the members’ ballot back in 2010. On that same day the Greens indicated that we did not support the approach that she proposed. We reiterated that position again when the bill was drawn from the ballot, and as a result we will be voting against the bill today.

Kevin Hague has blogged on why the Greens said they would vote against:

This Bill is very big and complex. I believe that the cross-Party approach that I set up was the best way of proceeding, and have been very pleased that work in the last Parliament led me to be able to continue work with Nikki Kaye (and many others outside Parliament) to produce this Bill. Along the way we are certain to have made some mistakes or policy decisions that others disagree with. That is why I have indicated that while the Bill sits in the ballot waiting to be drawn I am very keen to get feedback, so that we can refine it and advance important law reform that has the broadest possible support.

“But your Bill and Jacinda’s are very similar. Why are you voting against hers?” To understand that you need to look at the Bills – they’re not similar at all. Jacinda’s Bill does not change adoption law in any way. While my Bill is a substantive reform of adoption and surrogacy law, Jacinda’s instead gets the Minister of Justice to ask the Law Commission to update the advice they have already given on adoption reform and turn that into a bill. With the best will in the world, that process will take at least two or three years to arrive at the point we have already reached, and will use valuable Law Commission money and time to bring us to where we already stand! Even then the notional Bill would require a well-disposed government to do something with it. Well if we had one of those, it would pick up my Bill and advance it as a Government one. And hers doesn’t deal with surrogacy.

Labour withdrew from the cross-Party process on adoption in order to advance Jacinda’s approach – a choice of unilateralism over multilateralism. In my opinion it is a history of unilateralism from successive governments that has led to the situation we have now, where everyone agrees the existing law is obsolete and harmful, but nobody has done anything about it. I told Jacinda at the time, and then said publicly, repeatedly, that we opposed her move, because what we really need is an approach that will actually takes us forward, not a bill that won’t pass and is instead a distraction from the goal of having adoption law that actually works for families. It should be no surprise to anyone that our position hasn’t changed. Supporting Jacinda’s Bill would undermine the cross-Party work we have been doing for the last 3 years.

You can imagine Kevin’s annoyance. He’s been spending over a year working cross-party to do a serious piece of law reform, and Labour chooses to draft up a press release, call it a bill, and try and claim credit for doing something.

TUREI: We believe batting the issue back to the Law Commission is an abdication of the responsibility to act now. One of the reasons that this is important is that drafting a bill to give effect to the Law Commission’s recommendations requires political judgment calls to be made on many policy issues, not just legal or technical ones. It is Parliament that has the mandate to do this, not the Law Commission. Secondly, this bill incorporates another form of abdication of responsibility to a future Parliament. A future Parliament cannot be bound, of course—we know that well enough—by what we decide today, so there is no greater likelihood that the process will advance the cause of adoption reform any further than the Law Commission’s 2000 report did. More to the point, although it is inevitable that issues first raised by a particular Parliament will not be completed until a future one sometimes, this bill would effectively defer any action to a future Parliament. We need to take action now. Thirdly, the Law Commission already has a busy programme, and even under the very best of circumstances this bill will not result in an actual bill on adoption for us to debate for at least another 2 to 3 years. In other words this bill delays law reform further.

If the Ardern bill did proceed, it would mean that Parliament would have the perfect excuse to do nothing until the Law Commission reported back in three years or so.

There is no reason why a bill cannot be drafted now, and, indeed, one already has been, saving us those years. Back when the member first announced this bill colleagues from Labour and National had joined Green members in a cross-party approach addressing adoption reform. We still believe that this is the best way of pursuing the change, and, indeed, have continued to work with National and other parties in the House and community organisations to develop a bill.

Labour and Jacinda had a choice – continue with the cross-party work with adoption reform groups, or seek to do some cheap grandstanding. Sadly they chose the latter. You may not get headlines from the behind the scenes work – but you do get progress.

Hopefully Hague’s bill will be drawn out of the ballot in the near future, allowing real progress to be made on this issue. The Adoption Act is woefully out of date. Note also that this isn’t about same sex adoption. Louisa Wall’s Marriage bill has already changed the law to allow same sex married couples to adopt. Adoption law reform is about recognising that almost all adoptions today are open, not closed etc.

The fate of this bill is a good lesson to other MPs. Do the hard work up front. Parliament will not vote for a bill that contains no policy principles, no details and just asks someone else to write the actual bill that is needed.

Will Street drop euthanasia bill?

July 17th, 2013 at 3:00 pm by David Farrar

Isaac Davidson at NZ Herald reports:

Labour MP Maryan Street is under pressure to drop a member’s bill which would legalise euthanasia because her party is concerned it could be a negative distraction in the lead-up to the general election next year.

If Ms Street’s End of Life Choice Bill was pulled from the ballot, the debate could extend into election year, and some Labour MPs felt this could hurt the party’s run for Government by distracting from its main policies and deterring more conservative voters.

Ms Street said that several colleagues had discussed with her what would happen if the bill were pulled from the ballot in 2014.

I think they are more worried that the euthanasia bill could help the Conservative Party make 5%.

Personally I’ll be very disappointed if Maryan does drop the bill. I think we inflict some terrible suffering on people by not allowing them to opt for euthanasia.

If she does drop the bill, then maybe a Green Party MP can pick it up?

At present, there are 69 members’ bills in the ballot. Nine members’ bills were still waiting for a first reading, so another ballot was unlikely to be held until the end of the year.

Not quite right. Once the number awaiting first reading drops below eight, then another ballot is held. I expect another ballot in August, say September at the latest.

The Employment Relations (Continuity of Labour) Amendment Bill

June 13th, 2013 at 12:30 pm by David Farrar

Jami-Lee Ross has had pulled from the ballot his Employment Relations (Continuity of Labour) Amendment Bill. The purpose of the bill is:

to repeal section 97 of the Employment Relations Act 2000. Section 97 prevents the use of volunteers, contractors, or other casual employees by an employer during a strike or lockout

His rationale:

Any employment legislation needs to provide a balance between employers and employees to be fair. Section 97 creates an imbalance by providing unions with a significant legislative advantage during negotiations. The restrictions placed on employers preventing them from engaging temporary replacement labour to maintain business continuity duringa strike or lockout even extends to family members, volunteers, and willing workers from associated companies that may wish to work within an organisation to maintain business continuity. Restricting the ability of employers to engage temporary replacement labour can have a considerable impact on the productivity and financial viability of an organisation. These restrictions particularly affect the primary production processing industries where production cannot cease without considerable loss to a business.

As far as I’m aware, employees on strike can engage in other work, so it seems only fair employers can do much the same, and use temporary labour to keep revenue flowing. Otherwise a union action can cripple them.

Prior to the enactment of the Employment Relations Act 2000, no equivalent provision existed in any New Zealand employment legislation.

I’ll be interested to see what the situation is in other countries.

I think it is fair to say the the Labour Party will fight this bill with all their might.

UPDATE: It will be interesting to see how parties vote at first reading. We can assume National and ACT will vote in favour, and Labour, Greens and Mana against.

NZ First had this to say when the ERA was passed in 2000:

Part 8 – Clauses 97-111 – Strikes and Lockouts
Under these clauses employees are allowed to strike for a collective agreement, to obtain a multi-employer collective contract, and on the grounds of safety and health.

It prohibits an employer from using replacement labour during a strike but does not prohibit striking workers taking up other employment. This has the potential for a few employees to, in some circumstances, hold the employer, the industry, and sometimes the country, to ransom until their demands are met.

On the basis of their 2000 statement, one would expect they would at least vote for the bill at first reading so it can be considered by a select committee.