Garner on welfare reforms

March 1st, 2012 at 3:00 pm by David Farrar

blogs:

Who really thinks National’s welfare reforms are that scary?

They’re not.

Forcing people to be work-tested should be a basic contractual agreement between the Government and its “clients” when money changes hands.

Indeed much of that happens already – and has been occurring for years.

Paying the rent and power bills of teenagers directly before they spend their benefit money on booze and cigarettes is hardly radical.

No one will lose their benefits if they can’t find a job. All the Government is asking is that they get work tested sooner and that they become more aggressive in their search for work. They will lose the right to turn down work – they must take a job if it’s offered. If they continue to thumb their nose at work, they will start to lose their benefits.

And Duncan addresses the issue of the job snobs who say you should be able to choose what job you take up:

People need meaningful sustainable jobs. Flipping burgers is a job; it’s a start, we’ve all done this sort of work.

But it’s true for those entering the workforce for the first time in a long time that they need to start somewhere but they also need a pathway to show them the way out of those jobs too.

I often get accused by some who say I’m a media hack and what would I know about low-paid work?

Well I know something. I know I cleaned the Whitcoulls Queen Street store at 16 in my school holidays for youth rates – about $4.50 an hour at the time. I powder-coated curtain rails for $6.00 an hour in a Glenfield factory a year later. I put lids on toothpaste at the Avondale Redseal factory at the same time to help me pay for my first year at university.

My first job at TVNZ in 1995 was as an intern and I was paid $15,400 a year – about $250 a week from memory. A year later they put me on $21,000. By year three it was $30,000.

I worked like a slave for $250 a week. Try living on that in Auckland – it was impossible.

They were part-time crappy jobs (not the TVNZ one) – and they sure as hell encouraged me to take my studies seriously by year three!

Like Duncan I cleaned a store while at school. But I was 14 and got $1.99 an hour for cleaning at Woolworths. I was so proud to be in regular employment, working every day after school plus Friday nights and Saturday mornings. And my first job after university was $22,000 a year only and at one point I was working part-time for $18,000 a year.

But back to Bennett and her handling of these changes so far.

She’s tough. She’s been there. She’s been a solo mum. She’s had it hard. She’s come out the other end. Labour hates her. And she hates them more. It’s a perfect rematch of the Rumble in the Jungle – except these guys might be tougher. Labour regards her as a traitor in my opinion – and they’re going after her. Problem is – nothing is sticking yet. …

But Bennett has started the year with a spring in her step. She looks determined to front foot these welfare changes that she believes in.

Yesterday in response to questioning by Hone Harawira, I thought she nailed him by telling him to sort out his patch and his voters – who she claimed would rather smoke drugs than get jobs. Not every minister would try that one – but it silenced Harawira, which isn’t easy.

The Hansard records the exchange:

Hone Harawira: When the Minister talks about young mums going out to look for jobs, does she think young mums should be allowed to go to the front of the queue of the 150,000 people who are already unemployed, or does she think that the young mums should be made to wait until the 150,000 get jobs first, and can she please tell us where the jobs are for the 150,000 who are already unemployed, so that young mums can then get in line for the next jobs?

Hon PAULA BENNETT: The member could look in his own patch, actually. I have a newspaper article here about the forestry industry that is saying they cannot get enough workers because of the drug taking that is going on, and some of those workers are not stepping up and do not actually want the jobs. I was in Kawakawa just a few weeks ago, when I heard about someone who had 19 jobs and could not fill them. Two young women had gone into a job in hospitality in his own patch. Within 3 days their boyfriends came along and told them they did not want to see them working, because they did not want to see them getting ahead of themselves. We are going to back those young women. We are going to back them into work and try to get them off benefits. That member may not think that they are worth it, but we do.

Bang.

Tags: ,

50 Responses to “Garner on welfare reforms”

  1. Northland Wahine (648 comments) says:

    Just watched Minister Bennett on youtube…

    Hone’s tail must be so tucked between his legs it must be sticking into his own…

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  2. Bevan (3,965 comments) says:

    Ahhh Labour, blinded so much by hate they can’t see the big arse truck about to run them over.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  3. ross69 (3,652 comments) says:

    Ten myths about welfare.

    http://werewolf.co.nz/2011/02/ten-myths-about-welfare/

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  4. YesWeDid (1,029 comments) says:

    Hone has also called Paula a ‘bloody hypocrite’:

    ‘I like Paula, but she’s a bloody hypocrite,” says Harawira.

    ‘It was ok for Paula to go back on the DPB because it was too hard to survive, but it’s tough luck for her sisters today.’

    ‘It was ok for Paula to get a Housing Corp loan back then, but National made sure that it’s no longer available today.’

    ‘It was ok for Paula to stay on the DPB to raise her daughter, but she’s making sure that young woman won’t have that privilege anymore.’

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  5. Sam Hill (34 comments) says:

    Here’s a story we did on the welfare changes, yesterday.

    http://www.newswire.co.nz/2012/02/government-welfare-reforms-unpopular-on-the-street/

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  6. Peter (1,578 comments) says:

    Comin’ at you live….

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  7. Nick R (497 comments) says:

    Sorry, not getting the “bang” here. Bennett’s in her 4th year on the job. It’s not like she just started. But she’s still talking about how she’s going to start really doing something to get people back to work. Really soon.

    She talks a good game. But if she was going to make a difference we would have seen it long before now.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  8. Pete George (22,852 comments) says:

    So what are these 10 ‘myths’? I’ve had a bit of a look before, some of the detail is interesting but the questions are little more than exaggerated loaded nonsense.

    1. Anyone who wants to get off welfare can get a job.

    Many can and do. Obviously some can’t, for various reasons eg not enough jobs available, unemployable.

    2. People on welfare commit a lot of benefit fraud, at the expense of hard-working people

    Yes, some people (a small minority) do that.

    3. Putting a time limit on how long people can receive welfare is a good idea

    How many think that? About three?

    4. People who go off on the dole go onto sickness and invalids benefits. We have to crack down on them, too.

    A few do that. ‘People’ sort of implies all which is nonsense.

    5. Most of the people on welfare are unmarried mothers – many of them teenagers – who have extra children so that they can get more money.

    Obvious dramatic exaggeration.

    6. Lots of people are on welfare for years and years, and then their children and grandchildren become welfare dependent.

    Depends on what you mean by ‘lots’. Too many – yes. But a small minority.

    7. Making unemployment insurance compulsory would be a good idea.

    How many people think that? I don’t recall seeing it discussed.

    8. People on welfare are bludging on the rest of us.

    In effect a minority are, but ‘people’ is meant to sort of imply all which is nonsense.

    9. Young people need welfare reform in order to teach them the value of work.

    Nonsense – who thinks that? The best teachers of the value of work are parents and wider family, by example. Welfare reform may encourage or nudge some young people to find out the value of work for themselves.

    10. Thank goodness the Maori Party is at the Cabinet table, to ensure the genuine needs of Maori are being met.

    A political dig at the end, that’s been called a ‘myth’?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  9. Pete George (22,852 comments) says:

    ‘It was ok for Paula to stay on the DPB to raise her daughter, but she’s making sure that young woman won’t have that privilege anymore.’

    A load of uninformed bollocks – or deliberate misinformation. Bennett hasn’t scrapped the DPB.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  10. Ed Snack (1,738 comments) says:

    Let’s have a “least pay when you started” comparison. I worked in a shop for $16 per week in my first full time holiday job, 5 days plus late night Friday. So $0.40 per hour. Next year I laboured in a wool store at $0.96 an hour. Money was a worth a bit more back then though…

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  11. PaulL (5,873 comments) says:

    Nah, let’s go with crappiest job. Cleaning a supermarket deli, including all the ovens after they’d made the rotissiere chicken.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  12. cows4me (248 comments) says:

    The greatest threat to the left is welfare reform, their fear being that their polices / ideologies will prove to have been totally fucked up. Many brainwashed by lefty crap believe the state will always be there to make it right. God forbid the peasants realise that the state was the problem and was not the solution. The beloved socialist state needs dumb unemployed and unemployable canon fodder to stuff the ballot boxes.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  13. Keeping Stock (10,104 comments) says:

    And speaking of slap-downs, guess who was the first MP to be kicked out from the 50th Parliament; the video is up at Keeping Stock….

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  14. DJP6-25 (1,269 comments) says:

    cows4me 3:50pm. That’s precisely what they’re afraid of. To them, welfare provides a voting base. There are also many job opportunities for socialists with BS degrees [No, I don't mean Bachelor of Science.] Hence all the lies and handwringing.

    cheers

    David Prosser

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  15. YesWeDid (1,029 comments) says:

    Wow cows4me, you’ll fit in perfectly around here with those attitudes.

    Have you just got hold of a computer and discovered this internet thing?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  16. nasska (10,680 comments) says:

    cows4me

    One thing you’ll notice on Kiwiblog is the wide range of commentators who add their thoughts. Often we are blessed with the rants of those on the left who, forsaking their prescribed meds, leave the comfort of ‘Red Alert’ & ‘The Standard’ to troll their opinions in front of us. Regrettably most of them are barking mad but we have learned just to smile nervously & look the other way.

    Meanwhile, work hard…..thousands on welfare are depending on you.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  17. Linda Reid (396 comments) says:

    I must be older than you lot. First job out of school – $1/hr. $32/week after tax.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  18. Nostalgia-NZ (4,913 comments) says:

    It amuses me how many take Paula’s anecdotal ‘evidence’ seriously. Her story of being an ex beneficiary has worn thin. I don’t how effective her message is now or she as a messenger. Even Garner has swallowed it and seems to think of ‘tough’ talking with Harawira over shadows content of the debate.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  19. Bevan (3,965 comments) says:

    Wow cows4me, you’ll fit in perfectly around here with those attitudes.

    Have you just got hold of a computer and discovered this internet thing?

    Ahhh, classic left tactic. He’s not even 15 posts in and your firing off the personal insults.

    Guess thats how we know we’re getting under your skin.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  20. nasska (10,680 comments) says:

    Linda Reid

    You’re still a chicken. First full working year after I left school I grossed £745. Can’t recall doing much overtime that year so I was on about 7shillings/hour. Doesn’t sound like much & PAYE was much higher but a packet of 20 PallMall was 2s 6d & petrol 2s 11d/gallon.

    I’ll ring the undertaker now.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  21. Pete George (22,852 comments) says:

    cows4me

    One thing you’ll notice on Kiwiblog is that sometimes lefties pretend they’re righties and try and befriend new people here, don’t they nasska.

    My first job out of school was same as Linda, $1 per hour, $40 per week gross. Does that make me a bit younger? Maybe until I sort of recall getting 4 shillings an hour.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  22. nasska (10,680 comments) says:

    PG

    Fiscally right, socially libertarian…. that’s me.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  23. trout (902 comments) says:

    I recall promoting a tourist project on Waiheke (before it became fashionable). A bunch of sandal wearing solo mums turned up to the hearing to tell us that this was not the kind of employment opportunity they wanted for the children. ‘I would rather he go on the dole that be a waiter’. I guess, like others here, I have done a variety of jobs; fruit picking, pea vining, potatoe bagging, freezing works, wharves, truck driving, postie, waiting, food prep etc. etc. There are plenty of jobs around; every day I see new immigrants working in good entry level jobs after arriving in NZ yesterday. It is time the left stopped making excuses for the lazy.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  24. Keeping Stock (10,104 comments) says:

    My first job was during the Christmas holidays at the end of form four in late 1970. I was working at the Woolworths chain store (remember them?) and the starting wage was $0.40/hour. I’d no sooner started than there was a 10% General Wage Order (remember them?) and my pay went up to $0.44 per hour, or $17.60 for a 40-hour week.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  25. grumpyoldhori (2,410 comments) says:

    You lot would not know what hard work is, try drilling shot holes in a quarry at the age of sixteen.
    And yes I got paid well.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  26. Manolo (13,376 comments) says:

    I taught mathematics to some “thick” students. Not a bad pay at $4/hr, albeit only 12 hours a week.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  27. Leaping Jimmy (15,954 comments) says:

    It’s a shame Bennett like most Nats save their best lines for the House, where no-one gets to hear of them, unless the media mentions it, which they don’t.

    Whereas the lefties ALWAYS but ALWAYS have a well thought-out sound bite which they issue in their press release when the issue predictably breaks and which the media normally does mention.

    Bennett’s response to this predictable issue which did hit the media for example, was that it was 20 years ago. What sort of dumb stupid limp response is that to what was the totally predictable issue and angle which the left would take on these reforms? Obviously it hadn’t even occurred to her to think ahead and get something more substantial prepared so she was ready. Such as for example, drawing a comparison between politicians of all stripes who have left student fees in place whereas politicians of the current generation mostly got a fee-free education and how come the lefty politicians haven’t done anything about that? (Worded more eloquently of course but that is a much more powerful point and if one works in PR then no doubt one could come up with half a dozen more such repostes.)

    But time after time the child-like babe in the wood conservatives (by comparison to lefties) let opportunity after opportunity slip through their hands while the media simply gives voice to the by comparison exceedingly clever publicity emanating from the opposition.

    As I’ve said before many times, wake up Nats, or slice by slice of the elephant, by the time the next election comes, your poll ratings will have been whittled away by such tactics.

    I can’t understand why I need even to mention such things, given the Nats are in the game of idea sales same as all the other politicians and they are paid to do nothing but think about ways to do that. What the hell is the matter with them, and all conservatives? Don’t they understand anything? Newsflash: points in the House don’t (normally) amount to points in the electorate, and the electorate is what they should be focused on, 24/7/365. Just like the lefties do. If they want to win, that is.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  28. scrubone (3,048 comments) says:

    You don’t know a crappy job until you milk cows IMHO.

    You get up at 4am to get crapped on(literally), and finish work 14 hours later. Average 1 day off a week. I’m pretty sure on my first one my hourly rate worked out to around half the minimum wage at the time.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  29. adam2314 (377 comments) says:

    30 shillings a week. All found.. Boy Seaman RN. Buy your own replacements for uniform..

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  30. Steve (4,499 comments) says:

    nasska @ 5.39
    20 PallMall was 2s 6d & petrol 2s 11d/gallon.
    Half a crown bought enough petrol to travel from Hamilton to Waingaro Hot springs and back. I worked to pay my share of six who worked hard for some fun

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  31. The Scorned (719 comments) says:

    Scrubone ….snap….yeah Dairy farming is no joke. Although I got to sleep in till 5:30 where I was. Having your hand up a Cows fanny at 3 am on a cold wet Taranaki morning covered in shit and afterbirth sorting out breech births has a way of making you appreciate others things in life more…

    Go tell Indian immigrants that there are no jobs….they have no problem finding them. All the other guys I work with are Indians on minimum wage. Where are the Maori’s?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  32. trout (902 comments) says:

    Off the wire:

    A New Zealander who began working behind the counter at McDonald’s three decades ago has risen to the rank of managing director.

    McDonald’s New Zealand has appointed Patrick Wilson as its new boss and the first New Zealander to run the company in 21 years.

    Mr Wilson began at McDonald’s Queen Street when he was 18.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  33. Mary Rose (393 comments) says:

    Sorry guys (and I did my share of rubbish jobs as a student), but this thread is starting to remind me of:

    “There were a 150 of us living in a small shoebox in the middle of the road.”
    “: Cardboard box?”
    “Aye.”
    “You were lucky…”
    Etc
    ;-)

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  34. nasska (10,680 comments) says:

    Steve

    They were good times…..work hard & play hard.

    No regrets!

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  35. cows4me (248 comments) says:

    I must come clean, sorry YWD and Bevan I’ve been around here for years. A few weeks ago the computer went critical, suffice to say the hard drive had a meltdown in the hot weather. I tried to post under my old user name but had lost the password, the boss ( wife ) had cleaned the computer desk and destroyed all the old scraps of paper with mindless words and numbers on them some months ago. I tried to retrieve my old password but word press would not recognise my new email address so i have started all over again.

    Grumpy you should try shearing, atleast a jackhammer usually points in one direction and dosen’t fight you every step of the way’

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  36. ross69 (3,652 comments) says:

    Pete

    You will be aware that Mr Farrar believes that most on the DPB remain there for their entire working life. Is that the loaded nonsense you were referring to? The truth of course is quite different:

    “Since the DPB involves the care of children who are dependent at least until they are 18, you’d think it would reflect lifetime dependency very strongly. Yet instead, over two thirds of DPB recipients (67.7%) are on the DPB for less than four years. More than a quarter of them (26%) are on it for less than a year, even during the recession. If this is a lifestyle choice, it is hardly a fashionable one.

    Looking across all forms of benefits, 61.4 % of recipients are benefit dependent for four years or less. Only 14.3 % are on benefits for more than ten years – and since those figures include people with chronic physical and mental disabilities, the ratio of those staying on benefits because it is a ‘lifetime, lifestyle choice’ is lower again.”

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  37. Sonny Blount (1,845 comments) says:

    Ross69,

    So a third of recipients are on the DPB or other benfits for more than 4 years?

    That is shocking. Welfare as a lifestyle.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  38. double d (225 comments) says:

    Well cows4me …. The suspense is killing us.

    Unmask yourself!

    You were formally known as ……..?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  39. Lindsay (141 comments) says:

    “On average, sole parents receiving main benefits had more disadvantaged backgrounds than might have been expected:

    • just over half had spent at least 80% of the history period observed (the previous 10 years in most cases) supported by main benefits
    • a third appeared to have become parents in their teenage years.

    This reflects the over-representation of sole parents with long stays on benefit among those in receipt at any point in time, and the longer than average stays on benefit for those who become parents as teenagers.”

    http://www.msd.govt.nz/documents/about-msd-and-our-work/publications-resources/research/sole-parenting/understanding-sub-groups-of-sole-parents-receiving-main-benefits.doc

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  40. Manolo (13,376 comments) says:

    A New Zealander who began working behind the counter at McDonald’s three decades ago has risen to the rank of managing director.

    I’m sure he remembers Kris Faafoi.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  41. Brian Smaller (3,994 comments) says:

    At twelve I used to clean the smoko rooms and toilets in two factories at the Mount after school. I got $2 for doing them. $10 a week. I also got the morning paper run on the Mount wharf – that was a gold mine for someone at Intermediate. I was up at half four to get my papers and bike to the wharf to catch all the wharfies in the canteen having breakfast. Of course nowadays, in the interests of stopping child labourers in Pakistan making carpets for 26 hours a day, NZ ratified some UN Treaty that banned kids under 14 from working in paid employment – which is why you no longer see kids on bikes delivering papers.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  42. Peter (1,578 comments) says:

    Teenage jobs:

    Paper round
    Cleaner
    Tomato picker

    Can’t recall the wage, but it was very low, even at that time.

    First job:

    Clerical: 13K per year

    All character building stuff. Saved to go to University. Got better jobs. Started my own company. And so on….

    Everyone needs a start, whatever that start may be…..

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  43. Pete George (22,852 comments) says:

    ross69: You will be aware that Mr Farrar believes that most on the DPB remain there for their entire working life.

    No, I’m not aware of that and it would surprise me if it were true. Especially as it’s very unlikely many will have chikldren at home during “their entire working life”, but I think DPF is more aware of reality than you give him credit for.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  44. Scott (1,707 comments) says:

    Excellent comments DPF. You are a genius when you stay out of sexual politics. I agree totally with Paula Bennett. I would add that we need to return to families and individuals looking after themselves. As opposed to expecting the government to look after us. If you don’t work you don’t eat. I think both the Bible and Karl Marx would probably agree on this one.

    For too long we have had a culture of entitlement that enables people to live off the hard work of others. To expect to be paid benefits. Indeed the DPB when it was introduced there were only a few hundred people applied. Since then it has grown to what, about 100,000 people on the DPB? If you pay people for doing something then you will have more of it.

    I cannot help but think that if a single young woman knows that if she has a baby she will be paid thousands of dollars per year, every year until the child is 16, then that is a powerful inducement to some to just have a child. Also if a marriage breaks up and the man leaves, then again thousands of dollars will be paid out in benefits. Unfortunately we now have over 100,000 people on domestic purposes benefits, being paid for by the already overburdened taxpayer.

    Finally the country cannot afford an ever expanding welfare state. Otherwise we will go broke, as is happening in the case of Greece and probably Italy. These reforms by National are a welcome relief to the country.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  45. tom hunter (4,423 comments) says:

    You were formally known as ……..?

    My guess would be sideshowbob.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  46. Pete George (22,852 comments) says:

    I cannot help but think that if a single young woman knows that if she has a baby she will be paid thousands of dollars per year,

    I cannot help but think most young women bonk for other than monetary reasons. Before money was invented the human race still seemed to have been able to procreate.

    There could be a few maternal mercenaries but most single mothers will have other reasons for being in that situation.

    More than a few young men are also involved in this phenomena, they tend to be motivated not by bucks but simply and naturally by a word that rhymes.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  47. Paulus (2,503 comments) says:

    Looks like Garner has had an Epiphany. Must be Lent.
    He appears to ACTUALLY support something the National Government has done – bloody hell – won’t last though.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  48. freemark (452 comments) says:

    After school job, 1980, pushing a milk trolley around the hills of Otumoetai, rain or shine, all year. $5 for 3-4 hours.
    Bloody fit then tho.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  49. KevinH (1,131 comments) says:

    Bennett dismisses Harawira’s criticism,courtesy of TV1 Breakfast: (hope the FBI & STG don’t kick my door in)

    http://tvnz.co.nz/national-news/bennett-dismisses-harawira-s-hypocrite-jibe-4744621.

    Paula Bennett has a point, what initiatives has Hone Harawira undertaken to reduce unemployment in his electorate amongest Maori youth?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  50. grumpy (240 comments) says:

    Bah, humbug……….
    My first job was working on a farm during harvesting at Mayfield for $8 a week (6 days). Next job was meat hunting and we got 5c a pound but had to get them back to the airstrip – that was seriously good money………..

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.