Parliament 30 July 2015

July 30th, 2015 at 11:40 am by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: In light of his admission yesterday that health funding has not kept up with all inflationary pressures under this Government, how will the health budget absorb the increased cost of purchasing medicines that the Prime Minister has said is likely to result from the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement?
  2. FLETCHER TABUTEAU to the Minister of Trade: Does he agree with the headlines in the Nikkei Asian Review, “Will TPP end with whimper like Doha Round?”, and in Gareth Morgan’s column, “Could the TPP become Key’s most embarrassing moment”?
  3. TODD BARCLAY to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received on the outlook for the New Zealand economy?
  4. PHIL TWYFORD to the Minister for Building and Housing: Does he stand by his statement that non-resident foreign buyers in the Auckland housing market are a non-event; if so, on what empirical data does he base that?
  5. PAUL FOSTER-BELL to the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment: What progress is the Government making in ensuring overseas-based New Zealanders repay their student loans?
  6. Dr RUSSEL NORMAN to the Minister of Trade: Has the New Zealand Government provided to other governments involved in the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations any documents regarding New Zealand’s position on specific issues in the negotiations; if so, have those documents been made publicly available to New Zealanders?
  7. CLAYTON MITCHELL to the Minister for Workplace Relations and Safety: Does he stand by his statement, “It’s important to strike the right balance between safe workplaces for workers and unnecessary red tape on businesses and I’m confident we have landed in the right space.”?
  8. Hon JUDITH COLLINS to the Minister of Education: What reports has she received on Trades Academies?
  9. JACINDA ARDERN to the Minister for Social Development: How much money has her Government spent developing and testing the ‘predictive risk model’ that was announced in 2012 to identify children at risk of harm and abuse, and in what year will it be rolled out?
  10. MARK MITCHELL to the Minister of Customs: How will the Government’s investment in next generation SmartGates increase security and ensure passengers are processed faster and more efficiently at the border?
  11. CATHERINE DELAHUNTY to the Minister of Education: Has she taken any papers to Cabinet proposing changes for charter schools; if so, is this an admission that the charter school model is not working?
  12. Hon DAVID PARKER to the Minister of Trade: Why did he say to journalists asking about the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement “we need adults to do this – not breathless children to run off at the mouth” and why does he think we should trust the Government to protect New Zealand’s interests when the Prime Minister has already admitted on TV that the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement may trade away New Zealand’s right to ban the sale of our homes to foreigners?

National: Four questions on the economy, student loans, trades academies and SmartGates

Labour: Four questions on health spending, Auckland housing, child abuse and TPP

Greens: Two questions on TPP and charter schools

NZ First: Two questions on TPP and workplace safety

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm 

Health and Safety Reform Bill – second reading

The Bill replaces the Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992 and the Machinery Act 1950 to reform New Zealand’s workplace health and safety system, following the work of the Independent Taskforce on Workplace Health and Safety and the Royal Commission on the Pike River Coal Mine tragedy.

  • Introduced March 2014
  • 1st reading: March 2014, passed unanimously
  • SC report: July 2015, passed with amendments by majority with Labour, Green and NZ First minority reports

The second reading is a debate of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes for a maximum debate of two hours.

Appropriation (2015/16 Estimates) Bill – committee stage continued

This Bill authorises the individual appropriations contained in The Estimates of Appropriations for the Government of New Zealand for the year ending 30 June 2016.

  • Introduced May 2015
  • 1st reading: May 2015, passed without dissent
  • 2nd reading: June 2015, passed 63-58 with Labour, Greens, NZ First against

The debate is an 11 hour debate divided into ten sector debates. The sectors are:

  • Economic Development and Infrastructure Sector – done
  • Education Sector – done
  • Environment Sector – done
  • External Sector – done
  • Finance and Government Administration Sector – done
  • Health Sector – current
  • Justice Sector
  • Māori, Other Populations and Cultural Sector
  • Primary Sector
  • Social Development and Housing Sector

Each debate is a minimum of eight speeches of up to five minutes each, led off by the relevant select committee chairperson.

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Parliament 29 July 2015

July 29th, 2015 at 11:48 am by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. JAMI-LEE ROSS to the Minister of Finance: How has the New Zealand economy been affected by recent international economic developments?
  2. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement that “it is highly unlikely, actually, that the Government will have to pay any more through Pharmac. But on the basis that it had to pay a tiny bit more, the Government would fund that increase”?
  3. KEVIN HAGUE to the Minister of Health: What advice, if any, has he sought or received on threats to public health in New Zealand?
  4. Dr JIAN YANG to the Associate Minister of Education: What investment is the Government making in Auckland schools to manage growth?
  5. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  6. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: Has core Crown health expenditure kept up with health demographics and inflation growth since 2009/10?
  7. BRETT HUDSON to the Minister of Energy and Resources:What recent reports has he received on competition in the residential electricity market?
  8. CHRIS HIPKINS to the Minister of Education: Does she stand by her Government’s commitment that if partnership schools don’t succeed “the Government will be just as quick to close them down as we have been to establish them”; if so, how much taxpayer money is expected to be received by the Whangaruru partnership school between 28 May 2015, the date the Ministry recommended the termination of its contract, and 1 January 2016?
  9. TODD MULLER to the Minister for Building and Housing: What further progress has the Government made to deliver on its policy of delivering more houses in areas of need?
  10. KELVIN DAVIS to the Minister of Corrections: Does he stand by his answer during Oral Question No. 9 yesterday that “No, I have not received any reports” which contradict the official account of the number of attackers in the Littleton serious assault case?
  11. SARAH DOWIE to the Minister for Primary Industries: What recent reports has he received on the growth of the New Zealand horticulture industry?
  12. DARROCH BALL to the Minister for Social Development: Does she stand by all her statements?

National: Five questions on the economy, Auckland schools, electricity market, state housing and horticulture

Labour: Four questions on TPP, health spending, charter schools and Mt Eden Prison

Greens: One question on public health

NZ First: Two questions on PM standing by his statements and Anne Tolley standing by her statements

General Debate 3.00 pm to 4.00 pm

A general debate of 12 speech of up to five minutes for a maximum of an hour.

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

New Zealand Flag Referendum Bill – committee stage

The Bill establishes a process for the holding of 2 postal referendums, firstly to determine which alternative flag design is preferred by voters, and secondly to determine whether that alternative flag or the current flag is to be the New Zealand flag.”

  • Introduced: March 2015
  • 1st reading: March 2015, passed 76 to 43 with Labour and NZ First opposed
  • SC report: June 2015, supported with amendments by the majority, Labour dissenting
  • 2nd reading: July 2015, passed 63 to 58 with Labour, Greens and NZ First opposed

There is no set time limit for the committee stage. As the bill has three parts it is likely to be at least three hours.

Appropriation (2015/16 Estimates) Bill – committee stage continued

This Bill authorises the individual appropriations contained in The Estimates of Appropriations for the Government of New Zealand for the year ending 30 June 2016.

  • Introduced May 2015
  • 1st reading: May 2015, passed without dissent
  • 2nd reading: June 2015, passed 63-58 with Labour, Greens, NZ First against

The debate is an 11 hour debate divided into ten sector debates. The sectors are:

  • Economic Development and Infrastructure Sector – done
  • Education Sector – done
  • Environment Sector – done
  • External Sector – done
  • Finance and Government Administration Sector – done
  • Health Sector – current
  • Justice Sector
  • Māori, Other Populations and Cultural Sector
  • Primary Sector
  • Social Development and Housing Sector

Each debate is a minimum of eight speeches of up to five minutes each, led off by the relevant select committee chairperson.

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Parliament 28 July 2015

July 28th, 2015 at 11:48 am by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement that “I don’t want to ban foreigners from buying residential property”?
  2. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  3. DAVID BENNETT to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received on the state of the New Zealand economy and what do these reports show?
  4. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: When was he or his office first briefed on the contents of the draft New Zealand Health Strategy?
  5. JAMES SHAW to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement that “New Zealand is never going to sign up to the TPP unless we believe it is in New Zealand’s best interests”?
  6. BARBARA KURIGER to the Minister for Social Housing: What work is being done to ensure social housing is available for those most in need?
  7. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by his reported statement that the slowdown in growth this year had come at the right time in the electoral cycle?
  8. DAVID CLENDON to the Minister of Corrections: How many Final Warning Notices, in accordance with SERCO’s contract with the Crown, have been issued since SERCO took over management of the Mt Eden Corrections Facility?
  9. KELVIN DAVIS to the Minister of Corrections: Does he agree with the statement made by the Department of Corrections Chief Executive Ray Smith that “not everything is broken” in relation to SERCO’s management of Mt Eden Corrections Facility?
  10. ALASTAIR SCOTT to the Minister of Immigration: What measures has the Government announced to help spread the benefits of migration across New Zealand?
  11. Hon DAVID PARKER to the Minister of Trade: Is the effect of Article 139 of the New Zealand–China Free Trade Agreement that it allows restrictions to be introduced on foreign buyers of New Zealand homes, including Chinese buyers, so long as subsequent agreements with other countries are no more generous?
  12. NUK KORAKO to the Minister of Education: He ahaērāmahiāwhinakiakahakēatu ai teako o tehungarangatahi i Te Reo Māori?
    • Translation: What is being done to help more young people learn Te Reo Māori?

National: Four questions on the economy, social housing, immigration and Te Reo Māori

Labour: Five questions on housing x 2, DHBs, Mt Eden Prison and economic growth

Greens: Two questions on TPP and Med Eden Prison

NZ First: One question on PM standing by his statements

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

New Zealand Flag Referendum Bill – second reading

The Bill establishes a process for the holding of 2 postal referendums, firstly to determine which alternative flag design is preferred by voters, and secondly to determine whether that alternative flag or the current flag is to be the New Zealand flag.”

  • Introduced: March 2015
  • 1st reading: March 2015, passed 76 to 43 with Labour and NZ First opposed
  • SC report: June 2015, supported with amendments by the majority, Labour dissenting

The second reading consists of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each for a maximum of two hours.

Appropriation (2015/16 Estimates) Bill – committee stage

This Bill authorises the individual appropriations contained in The Estimates of Appropriations for the Government of New Zealand for the year ending 30 June 2016.

  • Introduced May 2015
  • 1st reading: May 2015, passed without dissent
  • 2nd reading: June 2015, passed 63-58 with Labour, Greens, NZ First against

The debate is an 11 hour debate divided into ten sector debates. The sectors are:

  • Economic Development and Infrastructure Sector – done
  • Education Sector – done
  • Environment Sector – current
  • External Sector
  • Finance and Government Administration Sector
  • Health Sector
  • Justice Sector
  • Māori, Other Populations and Cultural Sector
  • Primary Sector
  • Social Development and Housing Sector

Each debate is a minimum of eight speeches of up to five minutes each, led off by the relevant select committee chairperson.

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Parliament 23 July 2015

July 23rd, 2015 at 12:38 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. DAVID CLENDON to the Minister of Corrections: What specific events has he been made aware of at the SERCO-run Mt Eden Correctional Facility that could trigger a specific deduction from the performance-related fee, and which of those events have resulted in a specific deduction?
  2. KANWALJIT SINGH BAKSHI to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received on dairy prices and their effect on the New Zealand economy?
  3. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: Is he confident that the Government is adequately resourcing the public health workforce?
  4. GARETH HUGHES to the Minister for Climate Change Issues:Given criticisms that the carbon target he set is inadequate, will he set a more ambitious target ahead of the Paris climate negotiations in December?
  5. PAUL FOSTER-BELL to the Minister of Science and Innovation: How is the Government seeding more high-tech start-ups in the New Zealand economy?
  6. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he agree with the Reserve Bank Governor’s statement that “the growth outlook is now softer than at the time of the June Statement. Rebuild activity in Canterbury appears to have peaked, and the world price for New Zealand’s dairy exports has fallen sharply”?
  7. MARK MITCHELL to the Minister of Education: What reports has she received on education in regional New Zealand?
  8. PHIL TWYFORD to the Minister for Building and Housing: How does he intend to reduce the shortfall of Auckland houses in the next two years, given that under this Government the shortfall is increasing by 5000 a year, and the Productivity Commission predicts on current rates the shortfall – now 32,000 – will hit 60,000 by 2020?
  9. MATT DOOCEY to the Minister for Social Development: What is the Government doing to support people off benefits and into higher education?
  10. KELVIN DAVIS to the Minister of Corrections: Why did he state that he only learned about the practice of dropping this week, when he was directly told about it one month ago at select committee?
  11. JACQUI DEAN to the Minister of Tourism: What reports has he received on the progress on the New Zealand Cycle Trail?
  12. DARROCH BALL to the Minister for Social Development: Does she stand by all her statements in regard to the provision of social services?

National: Five questions on the economy, high tech start ups, regional educational, supporting people off benefits and the NZ cycle trail

Labour: Four questions on public health workforce, economic growth, Auckland housing and Mt Eden Prison

Greens: Two questions on Mt Eden Prison and climate change

NZ First: One question on Anne Tolley standing by her statements

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm

Social Security (Extension of Young Persons Services and Remedial Matters) Amendment Bill – first reading

The Bill amends the Social Security Act 1964 to extend the existing Youth Service to all 19-year-old beneficiaries with children, and 18- and 19-year-old beneficiaries without children who are considered at significant risk of long-term welfare dependency.

  • Introduced June 2015

The first reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

 

Health Practitioners (Replacement of Statutory References to Medical Practitioners) Bill – first reading

The Bill is an omnibus Bill amending 7 statutes to increase the range of functions that can be performed by health practitioners under those statutes by changing certain references to medical practitioners to references to health practitioners.

  • Introduced June 2015

The first reading consist of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes each, for a maximum debate of two hours.

 

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Results of Members’ bills ballot, Thursday 23 July 2015

July 23rd, 2015 at 12:31 pm by David Farrar

The four bills drawn are all from Labour MPs. They are:

  1. Parental Leave and Employment Protection (Six Months’ Paid Leave and Work Contact Hours) Amendment Bill Sue Moroney
  2. Education (Charter Schools Curriculum) Amendment Bill Hon Phil Goff
  3. Social Workers Registration (Mandatory Registration) Amendment Bill Carmel Sepuloni
  4. Official Information (Parliamentary Under-Secretaries) Amendment Bill Adrian Rurawhe

Parental Leave and Employment Protection (Six Months’ Paid Leave and Work Contact Hours) Amendment Bill

This bill extends paid parental leave to 26 weeks and adds provisions around work contact hours, where working parents are entitled to the flexibility of returning to work for a certain amount of time during the parental leave period without losing their entitlement to paid parental leave.

Note that the Government has already increased the duration of leave from 14 weeks to 18 weeks. This bill is unlikely to progress unless United Future support it.

Education (Charter Schools Curriculum) Amendment Bill

This Bill would requiring partnership schools kura hourua (“charter schools”) to teach the NZ curriculum.

This undermines the whole idea of charter schools having flexibility (like private schools) and is unlikely to be supported.

Social Workers Registration (Mandatory Registration) Amendment Bill

This Bill implements recommendations made to the Minister for Social Development by the Social Workers Registration Board to provide for the current voluntary system of registration for practising social workers to become a mandatory system.

I think this bill is worth supporting at least through first reading.

Official Information (Parliamentary Under-Secretaries) Amendment Bill

This Bill would ensure that information held by Parliamentary Under-Secretaries in their official capacity is official information, and subject to the Official Information Act 1982.

I support this bill and think it should be passed.

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Members’ bills ballot, Thursday 23 July 2015

July 23rd, 2015 at 8:24 am by David Farrar

With four members’ bills yesterday completing their first readings, that means another four get drawn from the ballot today. Those in the ballot as of late last night are:

 

Bill Title Member Name
1 Accident Compensation (Recent Migrants and Returning New Zealanders) Amendment Bill Melissa Lee
2 Affordable Healthcare Bill Barbara Stewart
3 Age of Majority (Attainment at 18 Years) Amendment Bill Brett Hudson
4 Better Public Service Target Results Independent Audit Bill Tracey Martin
5 Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill Dr Jian Yang
6 Buy New Zealand (Procurement) Bill Richard Prosser
7 Care of Children (Adoption and Surrogacy Law Reform) Amendment Bill Kevin Hague
8 Charter Schools (Application of Official Information and Ombudsmen Acts) Bill Hon Nanaia Mahuta
9 Child Poverty Reduction and Eradication Bill Jacinda Ardern
10 Children, Young Persons, and Their Families (Parent’s and Guardian’s Responsibility) Amendment Bill Barbara Kuriger
11 Climate Change (Divestment from Fossil Fuels) Bill Dr Russel Norman
12 Commerce (Supermarket Adjudicator and Code of Conduct) Amendment Bill Mojo Mathers
13 Credit Contracts and Consumer Finance (Break Fees Disclosure) Amendment Bill Kanwaljit Singh Bakshi
14 Crimes (Corporate Manslaughter) Amendment Bill Hon Damien O’Connor
15 Crimes (Non-fatal Strangulation) Amendment Bill Kelvin Davis
16 Criminal Procedure (Removing Paedophile Name Suppression) Amendment Bill Pita Paraone
17 Crown Minerals (Protection of World Heritage Sites) Amendment Bill Hon Ruth Dyson
18 Customs and Excise (Prohibition of Imports Made by Slave Labour) Amendment Bill Peeni Henare
19 Domestic Violence—Victims’ Protection Bill Jan Logie
20 Education (Charter Schools Abolition) Amendment Bill Chris Hipkins
21 Education (Charter Schools Curriculum) Amendment Bill Hon Phil Goff
22 Education (Charter Schools Teacher Quality) Amendment Bill Louisa Wall
23 Education (Public Good not Profit from Charter Schools) Amendment Bill Dr David Clark
24 Education (Restoration of Democracy to University Councils) Amendment Bill Hon David Cunliffe
25 Electricity Industry (Energy Efficiency) Amendment Bill Rino Tirikatene
26 Electricity Industry (Small-Scale Renewable Distributed Generation) Amendment Bill Gareth Hughes
27 Electricity Transparency Bill David Shearer
28 Employment Relations (Allowing Higher Earners to Contract Out of Personal Grievance Provisions) Amendment Bill Scott Simpson
29 Employment Relations (Certainty at Work) Amendment Bill Iain Lees-Galloway
30 Employment Relations (Restoring Kiwis’ Right to a Break at Work) Amendment Bill Jenny Salesa
31 Energy Efficiency and Conservation (Warm Healthy Rentals Warrant of Fitness) Amendment Bill Metiria Turei
32 Environment Canterbury (Democracy Restoration) Amendment Bill Dr Megan Woods
33 Family Proceedings (Paternity Orders and Parentage Tests) Amendment Bill Jacqui Dean
34 Healthy Homes Guarantee Bill (No 2) Andrew Little
35 Immigration (Refugee Quota) Amendment Bill Denise Roche
36 Independent Prison Inspectorate Bill David Clendon
37 International Non-Aggression and Lawful Use of Force (Implementation of Amendment to Statute of Rome) Bill Dr Kennedy Graham
38 Keep Kiwibank Bill Hon Clayton Cosgrove
39 Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary Establishment Bill Eugenie Sage
40 Land Transfer (Foreign Ownership of Land Register) Amendment Bill Mahesh Bindra
41 Land Transport (Vulnerable Road Users) Amendment Bill Julie Anne Genter
42 Legislation (Climate Impact Disclosure Statement) Amendment Bill James Shaw
43 Life Jackets for Children and Young Persons Bill Alfred Ngaro
44 Local Government (Four Well-beings) Amendment Bill Su’a William Sio
45 Local Government (Freedom of Access) Amendment Bill Paul Foster-Bell
46 Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill Joanne Hayes
47 Nurse Practitioners Bill Hon Annette King
48 Oaths and Declarations (Endorsing the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi) Amendment Bill Marama Fox
49 Oaths and Declarations (Members of Parliament) Amendment Bill Meka Whaitiri
50 Official Information (Parliamentary Under-Secretaries) Amendment Bill Adrian Rurawhe
51 Overseas Investment (Protection of New Zealand Homebuyers) Amendment Bill Phil Twyford
52 Parental Leave and Employment Protection (Six Months’ Paid Leave and Work Contact Hours) Amendment Bill Sue Moroney
53 Private International Law (Choice of Law in Tort) Bill David Bennett
54 Public Finance (Sustainable Development Indicators) Amendment Bill Steffan Browning
55 Public Works (Prohibition of Compulsory Acquisition of Māori Land) Amendment Bill Catherine Delahunty
56 Radiocommunications (Enhanced Public Broadcasting Provision) Amendment Bill Kris Faafoi
57 Receiverships (Agricultural Debt Mediation) Amendment Bill Ron Mark
58 Sentencing (Domestic Violence) Amendment Bill Poto Williams
59 Sentencing (Livestock Rustling) Amendment Bill Ian McKelvie
60 Shop Trading Hours Act Repeal (Shopping Centre Opening Hours) Amendment Bill Hon Trevor Mallard
61 Social Security (Apprenticeship Assistance for Youth) Amendment Bill Grant Robertson
62 Social Security (Pathway to Work) Amendment Bill Stuart Nash
63 Social Security (Stopping Benefit Payments for Offenders who Repeatedly Fail to Comply with Community Sentences) Amendment Bill Mark Mitchell
64 Social Workers Registration (Mandatory Registration) Amendment Bill Carmel Sepuloni
65 Summary Offences (Drink or Drugs Affecting Behaviour) Amendment Bill Clayton Mitchell
66 Summary Proceedings (Warrant for Detention Conditions) Amendment Bill Jonathan Young
67 Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Amendment Bill Clare Curran
68 Vulnerable Children (Mandatory Social Worker Registration) Amendment Bill Ria Bond
69 Waitemata Harbour Protection Bill Rt Hon Winston Peters

The bills by party (Ministers excluded) are:

  • National – 14/34
  • Labour – 32/32
  • Greens – 14/14
  • NZ First -8/12
  • Maori – 1/1
  • ACT – 0/1

If the other 20 National MPs got a bill in the ballot (or could get agreement of the hierarchy for their bills) then the chances of a non hostile bill being drawn would increase from 14/69 to 34/89 or from 20% to 38%.

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Parliament 22 July 2015

July 22nd, 2015 at 12:14 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. Dr JIAN YANG to the Minister of Finance: What recent reports has he received on the performance of the New Zealand economy and the Government’s management of its finances?
  2. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his justification for the $26 million process to consider changing the flag that “It’s just sheer confusion with Australia. Even at APEC they tried to take me to Abbott’s seat”?
  3. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  4. Dr PARMJEET PARMAR to the Minister for Building and Housing: What are the costs and benefits of the recently announced changes to the Residential Tenancies Act 1986 that will require homes to be insulated and to have smoke alarms?
  5. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: When did he first become aware that there was an international glut of dairy products and does he stand by his reported comments that he has no plans to take active steps to diversify the economy in response to falling dairy prices?
  6. JAMES SHAW to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his answers to Oral Question No. 4 yesterday?
  7. RICHARD PROSSER to the Minister of Finance: Is he still sceptical about how effective a register of foreign property buyers would be; if so, why?
  8. Dr SHANE RETI to the Minister of Health: What recent reports has he received on the effectiveness of the child immunisation programme?
  9. PHIL TWYFORD to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by his statement about whether inequality was a problem in the Auckland housing market, “We’ve been concerned about that for some time, that there’s part of Auckland where there’s been really no new supply of lower value houses that low and middle-income families can afford”?
  10. JONO NAYLOR to the Minister of Justice: What announcements has she made about improving the oversight and supervision for offenders deported to New Zealand?
  11. METIRIA TUREI to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement that “You certainly wouldn’t want to say to a low-income family they can never own a home, because I believe that they can own a home.”?
  12. KELVIN DAVIS to the Minister of Corrections: Does he stand by his statement in regards to the July 2014 report on fight clubs in Mt Eden Corrections Facility, that he “became aware of the report’s existence only late last week”?

National: Four questions on the economy, rental properties, child immunisations and deported offenders

Labour: Four questions on the flag referendum, dairy prices, Auckland housing and Mt Eden Prison

Greens: Two questions on Pm standing by an answer and housing affordability

NZ First: Two question on PM standing by his statements and a foreign buyers register

There are also two questions to members:

  1. MAHESH BINDRA to the Member in charge of the New Zealand International Convention Centre Act 2013 Repeal Bill: What is the intention of the New Zealand International Convention Centre Act 2013 Repeal Bill?
  2. CLAYTON MITCHELL to the Member in charge of the Fighting Foreign Corporate Control Bill: What is the intention of the Fighting Foreign Corporate Control Bill?

General Debate 3.00 pm to 3.00 pm

The general debate consists of 12 speeches of up to five minutes each, so a maximum of one hour.

 

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Parliament 21 July 2015

July 21st, 2015 at 1:13 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  2. CHRIS BISHOP to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received on the international economy, and its effect on the New Zealand economy?
  3. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement in relation to affordability of homes in Auckland that “there’s a general view that housing prices are not overvalued”, given that the homeownership rate has fallen to its lowest level in 64 years?
  4. JAMES SHAW to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement that “I’d bet my bottom dollar that there would be considerable debate and discussion in New Zealand about whether the flag should change”?
  5. SIMON O’CONNOR to the Minister of Health: What recent reports has he received on the number of B4 School free health and development checks completed in the last financial year, and what do they show?
  6. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he agree with the Prime Minister that bad news about the New Zealand economy is overblown, and that while dairy prices are down, “95 percent of our economy is not involved in that”?
  7. JOANNE HAYES to the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment: How is the Government delivering more of the skilled ICT graduates that New Zealand needs?
  8. KELVIN DAVIS to the Minister of Corrections: Does he stand by his statement that Mount Eden Corrections Facility is “the highest performing prison” for measures of core security, rehabilitation, and reintegration?
  9. ALFRED NGARO to the Minister for Social Development: What reports has she received on how the Kickstart Breakfast initiative is supporting vulnerable children?
  10. Hon DAVID PARKER to the Minister of Trade: Does the current draft of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement purport to restrict a future New Zealand Government from banning the sale of existing New Zealand homes to foreign buyers from Trans-Pacific Partnership countries?
  11. RON MARK to the Prime Minister: Does he have confidence in all his Ministers; if so, why?
  12. JAN LOGIE to the Minister for Social Development: Will she be raising benefit levels given official advice that shows that a family of four living on a benefit has $72 less per week than what they need to provide the “core essential items”; if not, why not?

National: Four questions on the economy, school health checks, ICT graduates and Kickstart Breakfasts

Labour: Four questions on Auckland housing, the economy, Mt Eden Prison and the TPP

Greens: Two questions on the flag referendum and benefit levels

NZ First: Two question on PM standing bu his statements and confidence in Ministers

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

Appropriation (2015/16 Estimates) Bill – committee stage

This Bill authorises the individual appropriations contained in The Estimates of Appropriations for the Government of New Zealand for the year ending 30 June 2016.

  • Introduced May 2015
  • 1st reading: May 2015, passed without dissent
  • 2nd reading: June 2015, passed 63-58 with Labour, Greens, NZ First against

The debate is an 11 hour debate divided into ten sector debates. The sectors are:

  • Economic Development and Infrastructure Sector
  • Education Sector
  • Environment Sector
  • External Sector
  • Finance and Government Administration Sector
  • Health Sector
  • Justice Sector
  • Māori, Other Populations and Cultural Sector
  • Primary Sector
  • Social Development and Housing Sector

Each debate is a minimum of eight speeches of up to five minutes each, led off by the relevant select committee chairperson.

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What happens if Parliament is wiped out?

July 17th, 2015 at 4:00 pm by David Farrar

A reader asked what would happen if Parliament was hit by an earthquake on Opening Day when all MPs and the Governor-General were present, and died.

I know the Civil Defence plan is to move it to Devonport Naval Base. But who would be the Government?

My guess is that the unsucessful List candidates would automatically become MPs to replace the dead List MPs. They would have to form a Government until the 71 by-elections could be held. So who would form the Government if this did happen?

Greens

15 DAVIDSON, Marama Mere-Ana
16 COATES, Robert Barry Hobson
17 HART, John Stuart
18 KENNEDY, David John
19 ELLEY, Jeanette Susan
20 McDONALD, Jack Baxter
21 MOORHOUSE, David Peter
22 ROTMANN, Sea
23 LECKINGER, Richard John
24 PERINPANAYAGAM, Umesh
25 RUTHVEN, Susanne Marie
26 MOORE, Teresa Janet
27 LANGSBURY, Dora Roimata
28 WOODLEY, Tane Hohepa

Labour

15 STREET, Maryan
17 MACKEY, Moana Lynore
21 HUO, Raymond
23 RADHAKRISHNAN, Priyanca
25 JONES, Rachel Anne

Maori Party

3 McKENZIE, Christopher Owen

National

52 PUGH, Maureen Helena
53 TURNER-TUPOU, Fia Taemanu
63 WALFORD, Wayne Douglas
64 BROWN, Simeon Peter
65 WALKER, Hamish
66 HOLDEN, Lewis
67 VARLEY, Karl Daniel
68 PENK, Christopher Aidan
69 COOPER, Linda Ann
70 O’DWYER, Letitia Marie
71 BRIDGES, Mark
72 SOKRATOV, Boris
73 EVETTS, Matthew Zane
74 O’FALLON, Carolyn Elisabeth
75 LITTLEWOOD, Charlotte

NZ First

13 PARORO, Mataroa
14 RUDZKI, Romuald Edward John
15 REEVES, Jon Blaiklock
16 LOLE-TAYLOR, Asenati
17 CATCHPOLE, Brent Stanley
18 ABRAHAM, George
19 DOLMAN, Raymond
20 BARR, Hugh
21 DEGIA-PALA, Anne
22 CAMPBELL, Steven Robert
23 PERRY, Edwin Jock

So the temporary Parliament would be:

National 15
Greens 14
NZ First 11
Labour 5
Maori Party 1

You’d need 24 votes to govern, so NZ First would hold the balance of power!

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Farewelling the Clerk of the House

July 3rd, 2015 at 12:00 pm by David Farrar

Some very nice tributes to retiring Clerk of the House Mary Harris:

Rt Hon JOHN KEY (Prime Minister): I seek leave to move a motion without notice recognising the retirement of Mary Harris, the Clerk of the House.

Mr SPEAKER : Is there any objection to that course of action being followed? There is none.

Rt Hon JOHN KEY : Well, we will ignore Mary, so there is no objection from anyone else. I move, That this House recognise the retirement of the Clerk of the House, Mary Harris, and put on record our appreciation and thanks for her years of service to Parliament. Mary was appointed Clerk in December 2007. She began her career in Parliament in 1987. Before coming to Parliament, she worked for the Department of Statistics, producing the labour force statistics in the household labour force survey – team. She was a professional violinist, captained the Wellington women’s cricket team from 1982 to 1986, and was vice-captain of the international 11 in the 1982 Cricket World Cup in Christchurch. She taught Brendon McCullum everything he knows.

I never knew Mary was a top cricketer.

Since Mary became Clerk in 2007 she has served three Speakers—Margaret Wilson, Lockwood Smith, and yourself, sir—all of whom speak very highly of her work and the leadership she has shown, in particular her focus on working with the Parliamentary Service to achieve common goals in the service of Parliament and parliamentarians. Mary’s last day is on Thursday, and I understand that she will be spending some time after that cycling around Italy before returning to build a new home in Ōtaki Forks and to focus on honing her goal of becoming an expert fisher. I know that we all wish her well for retirement, and that we look forward to a booty of great smoked fish being delivered to Parliament and tabled when we can at the next opportunity.

The role of the Clerk is a key one in Parliament. They need to have the trust and respect of basically every MP. They are the most neutral of officials.

Hon ANNETTE KING (Deputy Leader—Labour): I am pleased, on behalf of the Labour Opposition, to support the Prime Minister’s motion on the retirement of Mary Harris, Clerk of the House. Thank you, Mary, for your years of service to our Parliament—28 of them, starting in 1987. Your experience, as the Prime Minister said, has been in most sections of the Office of the Clerk, from the Hansard Office to select committees to the Deputy Clerk of the House, and then 7 years as the Clerk. Some of us were here under the previous Clerk, Dave McGee, who was considered the foremost authority on the workings of a Westminster parliament. They were always going to be big shoes to fill, Mary, but you have filled those shoes, and perhaps your preparation for facing the googlies of this place came from the fact that you were in the 1982 Women’s Cricket World Cup, averaging 41 runs in that match against our old adversary Australia. I am told that Mary is a right-handed batswoman, and that is the only time that she has shown preference between the right and the left.

Mary is our first woman Clerk and our first non-lawyer as a Clerk, and she has led the House through a great period of change, particularly technological change, with the e-committees. Some of us are still getting to grips with those changes, Mary. She embraced change, but not at the expense of Parliament’s enduring values. She has shown a strong commitment to finding new ways for Parliament to be open and accessible to the people who elect it, and we are the better for it. With Mary’s guidance there have been some important changes in the procedures for the smooth running of the House, such as extended sittings. Under her leadership, the Office of the Clerk has been described as a “little gem”—I think that is probably a pretty good description of Mary herself, actually.

MPs have come to regard her as an impeccable and impartial source of advice, and, like her predecessor, she too is now widely respected in Parliaments around the world. For example, Westminster, the home of our type of parliament, sought her opinion on their governance arrangements earlier this year.

High praise.

Hon PETER DUNNE (Leader—United Future): I want to share the sentiments expressed by others in tribute to Mary for all that she has achieved as our Clerk over the last 8 years, and the 20-odd years beforehand that she was a servant of this Parliament. I have often thought that there are a couple of essential attributes that a good Clerk requires. One is an absolute poker-face—to be able to listen to all of the debates in this Chamber, absorb their content so that the Speaker can be advised to make appropriate rulings, but never, ever betray a hint of prejudice or interest one way or the other in the course that the debate is taking. Mary, over the years you have proved to be absolutely inscrutable in that regard, and I think it is a tribute to your professionalism, your impartiality, and your skill that at a time when passions have mounted greatly in this House you have been often the one calm voice of order amongst us, so thank you for that.

I would be a very bad Clerk as my facial expressions would give away what I thought of what MPs are saying!

The House has been served very well by its Clerks. I also wish Mary well. I hope she has forgiven me for the several hundred amendments I authored and delivered to the Table Office during the Employment Relations Bill committee stage in 2000 when she was the Clerk-Assistant there :-)

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Parliament 1 July 2015

July 1st, 2015 at 1:27 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: How much has been spent by the Government on the Social Bonds Programme to date?
  2. MELISSA LEE to the Minister of Finance: How is the Government’s programme of fiscal management helping keep interest rates lower for longer?
  3. METIRIA TUREI to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement that “… we believe that New Zealand can make a positive difference to world affairs and provide a unique and independent voice at the world’s top table”.
  4. PAUL FOSTER-BELL to the Minister of Health: What steps is the Government taking to improve access to Primary Care for New Zealand families?
  5. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he agree with ANZ economist Cameron Bagrie when he says the New Zealand economy is “heading off-piste”?
  6. MARAMA FOX to the Minister of Trade: How many Māori organisations have been consulted during the last 5 years of negotiations on the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement?
  7. Dr PARMJEET PARMAR to the Minister of Transport: What recent announcements has he made on investment in New Zealand’s land transport network?
  8. RICHARD PROSSER to the Minister for Primary Industries: Is he concerned at the threat posed to New Zealand’s grain industry by the huge volumes of grain being dumped into New Zealand due to EU/Russia sanctions?
  9. CHRIS HIPKINS to the Minister of Education: Does she stand by her statement “I am satisfied that all the contract funding to partnership schools will be spent on meeting the contracted outcome for each school, which is to deliver educational achievement”?
  10. BRETT HUDSON to the Minister for Small Business: What actions has the Government taken to encourage small businesses to list on the New Zealand share market?
  11. KELVIN DAVIS to the Minister for Primary Industries: Is he aware of reports that local wood manufacturers have been refused the opportunity to buy swamp kauri from Kauri Ruakaka mill, which was formerly called Oravida and is allegedly involved in exporting raw swamp kauri, and what is he doing to ensure that this irreplaceable resource is managed responsibly?
  12. JULIE ANNE GENTER to the Minister of Transport: What percentage of the National Land Transport Programme announced yesterday will be spent on new rail infrastructure?

National: Four questions on interest rates, primary heath care, transport funding and small business

Labour: Four questions on social bonds, the economy, charter schools and raw swamp kauri

Greens: Two questions on world affairs and transport funding

NZ First: One question on grain dumping

Maori Party: One question on TPPA

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

Reserves and Other Lands Disposal Bill – committee stage continued

The bill makes a number of changes to the status of parcels of land, land titles, and previous Reserves and Other Lands Disposal Acts.

  • Introduced: July 2008
  • 1st reading: March 2009, passed 113 to 9 with only Greens opposed
  • Select Committee report: September 2009, supported unanimously with amendments
  • 2nd reading: May 2015, passed unanimously

The committee has dealt with Part 1 and is now debating Part 2.

Standards and Accreditation Bill – committee stage

The bill amends and consolidates the law relating to standards and conformity assessment bodies “to ensure the New Zealand Standards and conformance system is viable, well-functioning, and meets the needs of business, regulators, and consumers into the foreseeable future.”

  • Introduced: July 2014
  • 1st reading: November 2014, passed unanimously
  • SC report: March 2015, supported with amendments with a minority report from Labour
  • 2nd reading: May 2015, passed 61-60 with Labour, Greens, NZ First and Maori Party against

There is no set time limit for the committee stage. The bill has two parts so debate is likely to last at least two hours. There is a minor SOP from Minister Goldsmith.

Radio New Zealand Amendment Bill – committee stage

The bill amends the Radio New Zealand Act 1995 to implement a new Radio New Zealand Charter

  • Introduced: June 2009
  • 1st reading: June 2009, passed unanimously
  • SC report: December 2009, supported without amendments with a minority report from Labour
  • 2nd reading: May 2015, passed unanimously

There is no set time limit for the committee stage. The bill has six clauses but is supported by all parties so unlikely to have a lengthy debate. so debate is likely to last at least two hours. There is an SOP from Minister Adams defining what commercial-free means.

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Parliament 30 June 2015

June 30th, 2015 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. ANDREW BAYLY to the Minister of Finance: What Budget policies will soon take effect and help to distribute dividends from the growing economy to New Zealand families?
  2. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement that “Locally-based providers can be closer and more responsive to their community” in relation to the Government’s policy to sell state houses to private providers?
  3. STUART SMITH to the Minister for Workplace Relations and Safety: How is the Government helping to support young New Zealand families through paid parental leave?
  4. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Minister for Building and Housing: Does he stand by all his statements?
  5. JONATHAN YOUNG to the Minister of Transport: What is the Government doing to support the development of urban cycleways across New Zealand?
  6. PHIL TWYFORD to the Minister responsible for HNZC: Does he still intend to sell 1,000 to 2,000 Housing New Zealand houses by January 2016, and that “houses will not be transferred unless tenants get better services and taxpayers get fair and reasonable value”?
  7. METIRIA TUREI to the Minister responsible for HNZC: Does he stand by his statement that “Anyone that wants to have a go at this will have to show that they’ve got the capacity to manage the properties, to manage the finances, to look after the tenants and to help redevelop our social housing community”?
  8. DAVID SHEARER to the Minister of Consumer Affairs: Is he satisfied that New Zealanders are not paying too much for their milk; if so, why?
  9. BARBARA KURIGER to the Minister of Revenue: What reports has he received about changes which will bolster the tax rules around residential property speculation?
  10. Dr KENNEDY GRAHAM to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  11. MARK MITCHELL to the Minister of Customs: What effect is the lower tobacco duty-free limit having on the amount of cigarettes and tobacco being brought into New Zealand at the border?
  12. SUE MORONEY to the Minister for ACC: Why will people with older cars pay $90 more per year to register their vehicle than those who can afford the latest model Rolls Royce?

National: Five questions on Budget, paid parental leave, cycleways, property tax rules and tobacco duty

Labour: Four questions on state houses x 2, milk prices and ACC levies

Greens: Two questions on state houses and does PM stand bu statements

NZ First: One question on Minister of Building standing by his statements

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

Harmful Digital Communications Bill – third reading continued

The Bill aims to “mitigate the harm caused to individuals by digital communications and to provide victims of harmful digital communications with a quick and efficient means of redress.” by creating a new civil enforcement regime to quickly and effectively deal with harmful digital communications; creating new criminal offences to deal with the most serious harmful digital communications and making some small amendments to existing legislation to clarify their application to digital communications and cover technological advances.

  • Introduced: November 2013
  • 1st reading: December 2013, passed unanimously
  • Select Committee Report: May 2014, supported unanimously, with amendments
  • 2nd reading: March 2015, passed 77-43, with Labour and NZ First against
  • Committee: June 2015, Minister’s SOP passed 120-1 with ACT against

There are nine speeches of up to 10 minutes remaining for a maximum of 90 minutes.

Environmental Reporting Bill – committee stage continued

The bill provides for independent environmental reports in the areas of air, climate and atmosphere, freshwater, marine and land.

  • Introduced February 2014
  • 1st reading: March 2014, passed 78 to 41 with Labour and NZ First opposed
  • Select Committee report: March 2015, supported with amendments by the majority, minority views by Labour and Greens
  • 2nd reading: May 2015, passed 61 to 60 with Labour, Greens, NZ First and Maori Party opposed

There is no time limit for the committee stage. It has two parts so is likely to last for at least two hours.  There is one SOP from Eugenie Sage.

New Zealand Superannuation and Retirement Income Amendment Bill – committee stage

The bill amends the New Zealand Superannuation and Retirement Income Act 2011 to facilitate the efficient and effective investment of the New Zealand Superannuation Fund by allowing the Guardians to control entities formed for the purpose of holding, facilitating, or managing the investments of the Fund.

  • Introduced: November 2013
  • 1st reading: March 2014, passed unanimously
  • SC report: July 2014, supported with amendments without dissent
  • 2nd reading: May 2015, passed 101-13 with Greens against

There is no time limit for the committee stage. It has two parts so is likely to last for at least two hours.  There are two SOPs from Bill English.

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Four new members’ bills

June 26th, 2015 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

Four bills were drawn from the ballot yesterday. They are:

Local Government Act 2002 (Greater Local Democracy) Amendment Bill – Labour MP Stuart Nash

This bill would mean any poll on amalgamations of local government will be unsuccessful unless it gains not just a majority over the affected area, but also a majority in each and every district within.

Public Collections and Solicitations (Disclosure of Payment) Bill – National MP Matt Doocey

This would require people soliciting donations, signatures or the like to disclose whether they are paid collectors.

Financial Assistance for Live Organ Donors Bill – National MP Chris Bishop

This would allow people who can not work due to having donated organs, to get income assistance equivalent to ACC (80% of lost earnings) for a maximum of 12 weeks, compared to the current sickness benefit only.

New Zealand Superannuation and Retirement Income (Pro Rata Entitlement) Amendment Bill – NZ First MP Denis O’Rourke.

This would reduce the level of NZ Superannuation on a pro-rata basis to people who have not been or remained in NZ between the ages of 20 and 65.

My thoughts on each are:

  • Nash bill – just seeks to reverse a law change from a few years ago. Would vote against at first reading
  • Doocey bill – a useful concept and enhanced transparency is good but current wording may be too draconian. Support at first reading, and review after select committee
  • Bishop bill – strongly support
  • O’Rourke bill – is worth having a debate on the issue, and the principle of less NZ Super for those who spent less time in NZ is not a bad one. But don’t want to punish people for doing their OE for a few years. Worth supporting at first reading to get submissions
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Clerk argues for satire

June 25th, 2015 at 12:00 pm by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

Parliament’s top official has urged MPs to “grow up” and allow the official television feed to be used to mock them.

Mary Harris, Clerk of the House, told the Privileges Committee a ban on using footage of Parliament for satire may need to be relaxed “in this day and age”. …

Harris, whose seven-year term as Clerk ends on July 3, said the rules around satire were developed at a time when television was among the only ways of viewing Parliament, but with the proliferation of media the concerns had changed.

The rules have “been lifted in Australia [and] we borrowed our rules from Australia, and we maybe need to grow up,” Harris told the committee on Wednesday.

“I don’t think there’s a need to shelter Members [of Parliament] any longer.”

“It’s difficult to police. Once or twice Speakers have brought people in and given them a bit of a lecture about it but I think it’s a bit like slapping people with a wet bus ticket.”

I agree. The rule is ignored anyway, and satire is a good thing!

Harris said the committee may want to consider other changes, including expanding rules around photography to cover MPs taking photos in the House, as standing orders related only to footage taken from the public and press galleries.

Official footage of Parliament should also be allowed to show MPs misbehaving, Harris said.

“If members are going to be disorderly, they should be seen to be so.” …

Press Gallery chairwoman Claire Trevett told the committee the gallery backed the lifting of rules around disorder in the House, signalling that if there was an episode such as MPs brawling, the chances were media outlets may simply ignore the rules.

The idea behind that rule is to discourage MPs deliberately misbehaving so they get on TV, but they’re not really discouraged anyway. Another rule that can go.

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Members’ bill ballot 25 June 2015

June 25th, 2015 at 10:16 am by David Farrar

There will be a whopping four bills drawn from the ballot of 73 at midday today. Bills in the ballot are:

  Bill Title Member Name
1 Accident Compensation (Recent Migrants and Returning New Zealanders) Amendment Bill Melissa Lee
2 Affordable Healthcare Bill Barbara Stewart
3 Age of Majority (Attainment at 18 Years) Amendment Bill Brett Hudson
4 Better Public Service Target Results Independent Audit Bill Tracey Martin
5 Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill Dr Jian Yang
6 Buy New Zealand (Procurement) Bill Richard Prosser
7 Care of Children (Adoption and Surrogacy Law Reform) Amendment Bill Kevin Hague
8 Charter Schools (Application of Official Information and Ombudsmen Acts) Bill Hon Nanaia Mahuta
9 Child Poverty Reduction and Eradication Bill Jacinda Ardern
10 Children, Young Persons, and Their Families (Parent’s and Guardian’s Responsibility) Amendment Bill Barbara Kuriger
11 Climate Change (Divestment from Fossil Fuels) Bill Dr Russel Norman
12 Commerce (Supermarket Adjudicator and Code of Conduct) Amendment Bill Steffan Browning
13 Credit Contracts and Consumer Finance (Break Fees Disclosure) Amendment Bill Kanwaljit Singh Bakshi
14 Crimes (Corporate Manslaughter) Amendment Bill Hon Damien O’Connor
15 Crimes (Non-fatal Strangulation) Amendment Bill Kelvin Davis
16 Criminal Procedure (Removing Paedophile Name Suppression) Amendment Bill Pita Paraone
17 Crown Minerals (Protection of World Heritage Sites) Amendment Bill Hon Ruth Dyson
18 Customs and Excise (Prohibition of Imports Made by Slave Labour) Amendment Bill Peeni Henare
19 Domestic Violence—Victims’ Protection Bill Jan Logie
20 Education (Charter Schools Abolition) Amendment Bill Chris Hipkins
21 Education (Charter Schools Curriculum) Amendment Bill Hon Phil Goff
22 Education (Charter Schools Teacher Quality) Amendment Bill Louisa Wall
23 Education (Public Good not Profit from Charter Schools) Amendment Bill Dr David Clark
24 Education (Restoration of Democracy to University Councils) Amendment Bill Hon David Cunliffe
25 Electricity Industry (Energy Efficiency) Amendment Bill Rino Tirikatene
26 Electricity Industry (Small-Scale Renewable Distributed Generation) Amendment Bill Gareth Hughes
27 Electricity Transparency Bill David Shearer
28 Employment Relations (Allowing Higher Earners to Contract Out of Personal Grievance Provisions) Amendment Bill Scott Simpson
29 Employment Relations (Certainty at Work) Amendment Bill Iain Lees-Galloway
30 Employment Relations (Restoring Kiwis’ Right to a Break at Work) Amendment Bill Jenny Salesa
31 Employment Relations (Safe and Healthy Workplaces) Amendment Bill Alastair Scott
32 Energy Efficiency and Conservation (Warm Healthy Rentals Warrant of Fitness) Amendment Bill Metiria Turei
33 Environment Canterbury (Democracy Restoration) Amendment Bill Dr Megan Woods
34 Equal Pay Amendment Bill Mojo Mathers
35 Family Proceedings (Paternity Orders and Parentage Tests) Amendment Bill Jacqui Dean
36 Financial Assistance for Live Organ Donors Bill Chris Bishop
37 Healthy Homes Guarantee Bill (No 2) Andrew Little
38 Immigration (Refugee Quota) Amendment Bill Denise Roche
39 Independent Prison Inspectorate Bill David Clendon
40 International Non-Aggression and Lawful Use of Force (Implementation of Amendment to Statute of Rome) Bill Dr Kennedy Graham
41 Keep Kiwibank Bill Hon Clayton Cosgrove
42 Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary Establishment Bill Eugenie Sage
43 Land Transfer (Foreign Ownership of Land Register) Amendment Bill Mahesh Bindra
44 Land Transport (Vulnerable Road Users) Amendment Bill Julie Anne Genter
45 Legislation (Climate Impact Disclosure Statement) Amendment Bill James Shaw
46 Life Jackets for Children and Young Persons Bill Alfred Ngaro
47 Local Government (Four Well-beings) Amendment Bill Su’a William Sio
48 Local Government (Freedom of Access) Amendment Bill Paul Foster-Bell
49 Local Government Act 2002 (Greater Local Democracy) Amendment Bill Stuart Nash
50 Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill Joanne Hayes
51 New Zealand Superannuation and Retirement Income (Pro Rata Entitlement) Amendment Bill Denis O’Rourke
52 Nurse Practitioners Bill Hon Annette King
53 Oaths and Declarations (Endorsing the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi) Amendment Bill Marama Fox
54 Oaths and Declarations (Members of Parliament) Amendment Bill Meka Whaitiri
55 Official Information (Parliamentary Under-Secretaries) Amendment Bill Adrian Rurawhe
56 Overseas Investment (Protection of New Zealand Homebuyers) Amendment Bill Phil Twyford
57 Parental Leave and Employment Protection (Six Months’ Paid Leave and Work Contact Hours) Amendment Bill Sue Moroney
58 Private International Law (Choice of Law in Tort) Bill David Bennett
59 Public Collections and Solicitations (Disclosure of Payment) Bill Matt Doocey
60 Public Works (Prohibition of Compulsory Acquisition of Māori Land) Amendment Bill Catherine Delahunty
61 Radiocommunications (Enhanced Public Broadcasting Provision) Amendment Bill Kris Faafoi
62 Receiverships (Agricultural Debt Mediation) Amendment Bill Ron Mark
63 Sentencing (Domestic Violence) Amendment Bill Poto Williams
64 Sentencing (Livestock Rustling) Amendment Bill Ian McKelvie
65 Shop Trading Hours Act Repeal (Shopping Centre Opening Hours) Amendment Bill Hon Trevor Mallard
66 Social Security (Apprenticeship Assistance for Youth) Amendment Bill Grant Robertson
67 Social Security (Stopping Benefit Payments for Offenders who Repeatedly Fail to Comply with Community Sentences) Amendment Bill Mark Mitchell
68 Social Workers Registration (Mandatory Registration) Amendment Bill Carmel Sepuloni
69 Summary Offences (Drink or Drugs Affecting Behaviour) Amendment Bill Clayton Mitchell
70 Summary Proceedings (Warrant for Detention Conditions) Amendment Bill Jonathan Young
71 Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Amendment Bill Clare Curran
72 Vulnerable Children (Mandatory Social Worker Registration) Amendment Bill Ria Bond
73 Waitemata Harbour Protection Bill Rt Hon Winston Peters
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Parliament 24 June 2015

June 24th, 2015 at 12:02 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement, in question time yesterday, he would “absolutely” retain confidence in a Minister who authorised a multi-million dollar payment to a disaffected businessman to unlock a free-trade deal?
  2. JAMES SHAW to the Prime Minister: Does he still have confidence in the Minister of Foreign Affairs?
  3. ANDREW BAYLY to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received showing why more housing is needed as part of supporting a growing New Zealand economy?
  4. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: What advice, if any, did he give to Cabinet on the risks of the Social Bonds Pilot announced on 1 June 2015?
  5. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Minister for Māori Development: Does he stand by all his statements?
  6. ALASTAIR SCOTT to the Minister of Revenue: What recent announcements has the Government made around tax rules on property transactions?
  7. Hon DAVID PARKER to the Minister of Foreign Affairs: Did he meet with David Brownrigg and George Assaf in Auckland on 18 October 2011 “to discuss trade between New Zealand and the Middle East and, in particular, the resumption of a specialised live export sheep trade with the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia” and was that meeting the subject of a letter to him dated 2 November 2011 from Brownrigg Agriculture on behalf of Mr Al Khalaf and Mr George Assaf?
  8. KANWALJIT SINGH BAKSHI to the Minister for Communications: What recent announcements has she made on a new emergency response system for mobile 111 calls?
  9. FLETCHER TABUTEAU to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  10. CLARE CURRAN to the Minister for Māori Development: Why did he tell Radio New Zealand yesterday he did not discuss programming content with Paora Maxwell on 20 May, when Paora Maxwell said in an email to staff on 22 May that “We talked about … content”?
  11. JACQUI DEAN to the Minister for Small Business: What steps are the Government taking to improve the way we collect data from rural small businesses?
  12. KEVIN HAGUE to the Minister for Climate Change Issues: Does he agree with Lancet Commission co-Chair Professor Hugh Montgomery that “climate change is a medical emergency” but “tackling climate change could be the greatest global health opportunity of the 21st century”?

National: Four questions on the economy, property tax rules, 111 calls and small businesses

Labour: Four questions on the Saudi Arabia farm x2, social bonds, and Maori TV

Greens: Two questions on the Saudi Arabia farm and climate change

NZ First: Two questions on Maori Affairs Minister and PM standing by their statements

General Debate 3.00 pm to 3.00 pm

The general debate consists of 12 speeches of up to five minutes each, so a maximum of one hour.

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Parliament 23 June 2015

June 23rd, 2015 at 11:53 am by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Minister for Māori Development: Does he stand by all his statements?
  2. CHRIS BISHOP to the Minister of Finance: What progress is the Government making in helping reduce New Zealand’s external debt position?
  3. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he have confidence in his Minister for Building and Housing given that, since he became responsible for housing, the average Auckland house price has risen by $221,000, which works out at over $250 a day?
  4. JAMES SHAW to the Prime Minister: Does he have confidence in all his Ministers?
  5. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement regarding refugee numbers that “it’s not 750, and I think it’s 3000 or 4000 off the top of my head”?
  6. IAN McKELVIE to the Minister of Civil Defence: What support is the Government providing to communities affected by the severe storm and flooding event of 18 to 21 June?
  7. Dr DAVID CLARK to the Minister for Economic Development:Does he stand by his statement on who is responsible for the spending at the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment: “Well, the Minister responsible for the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment is me”?
  8. CATHERINE DELAHUNTY to the Minister for the Environment: Does he support the continued Landcorp conversion from forestry to dairy despite the impact dairy farming has on freshwater quality, and the ongoing loss of forest as a carbon sink?
  9. FLETCHER TABUTEAU to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  10. Hon JUDITH COLLINS to the Minister for Communications: Can she provide an update on the build programme for the first stage of the Ultra-Fast Broadband initiative?
  11. IAIN LEES-GALLOWAY to the Minister for Workplace Relations and Safety: Does he stand by his statement that “What will improve our health and safety record is changes in behaviour and attitude, and that is what I am promoting”?
  12. PAUL FOSTER-BELL to the Associate Minister for Social Development: What update can she provide about the Government’s welfare fraud reform initiatives?

National: Four questions on debt, civil defence, UFB and welfare fraud

Labour: Four questions on Auckland house prices, refugee numbers, MBIE spending and health and safety

Greens: Two questions on confidence in Ministers and Landcorp conversion of land

NZ First: Two questions on Minister of Maori Development standing by his statements and PM standing by his statements

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

Exclusive Economic Zone and Continental Shelf (Environmental Effects) (Transitional Provisions) Amendment Bill – third reading continued

The bill amends the Exclusive Economic Zone and Continental Shelf (Environmental Effects) Act 2012 (the EEZ Act) to overcome unintended effects of Section 162 of by allowing existing petroleum operators who have applied for a marine consent to continue their operations until the application is decided and any subsequent objections or appeals are determined.

  • Introduced: February 2015
  • 1st reading: February 2015, passed 106-13 with Greens against
  • SC report: May 2015, supported without dissent with amendments
  • 2nd reading: June 2015
  • Committee: passed without amendments or dissent

There are 11 speeches of up to 10 minutes remaining for a maximum of 110 minutes.

Harmful Digital Communications Bill – second reading

The Bill aims to “mitigate the harm caused to individuals by digital communications and to provide victims of harmful digital communications with a quick and efficient means of redress.” by creating a new civil enforcement regime to quickly and effectively deal with harmful digital communications; creating new criminal offences to deal with the most serious harmful digital communications and making some small amendments to existing legislation to clarify their application to digital communications and cover technological advances.

  • Introduced: November 2013
  • 1st reading: December 2013, passed unanimously
  • Select Committee Report: May 2014, supported unanimously, with amendments
  • 2nd reading: March 2015, passed 77-43, with Labour and NZ First against

There is no time limit for the committee stage. It has two parts so is likely to last for at least two hours.  There is a reasonably extensive SOP from Amy Adams.

Environmental Reporting Bill – committee stage continued

The bill provides for independent environmental reports in the areas of air, climate and atmosphere, freshwater, marine and land.

  • Introduced February 2014
  • 1st reading: March 2014, passed 78 to 41 with Labour and NZ First opposed
  • Select Committee report: March 2015, supported with amendments by the majority, minority views by Labour and Greens
  • 2nd reading: May 2015, passed 61 to 60 with Labour, Greens, NZ First and Maori Party opposed

There is no time limit for the committee stage. It has two parts so is likely to last for at least two hours.  There is one SOP from Eugenie Sage.

New Zealand Superannuation and Retirement Income Amendment Bill – committee stage

The bill amends the New Zealand Superannuation and Retirement Income Act 2011 to facilitate the efficient and effective investment of the New Zealand Superannuation Fund by allowing the Guardians to control entities formed for the purpose of holding, facilitating, or managing the investments of the Fund.

  • Introduced: November 2013
  • 1st reading: March 2014, passed unanimously
  • SC report: July 2014, supported with amendments without dissent
  • 2nd reading: May 2015, passed 101-13 with Greens against

There is no time limit for the committee stage. It has two parts so is likely to last for at least two hours.  There are two SOPs from Bill English

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Parliament 17 June 2015

June 17th, 2015 at 12:29 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement “what I can say about the Minister for Housing is that he is outstanding”; if so, what has been outstanding about his roll-out of the Government’s new Auckland housing policy?
  2. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Minister of Energy and Resources: Does he stand by all the Prime Minister’s statements regarding the electricity market; if so, why?
  3. SARAH DOWIE to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received showing that lower interest rates and a pick-up in construction activity are helping to support growth in the economy?
  4. Dr DAVID CLARK to the Minister for Economic Development:Does the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment’s expenditure of $140,747.66 on a public information screen show it is achieving one of its principal goals of realising efficiency gains over time?
  5. JONO NAYLOR to the Minister for Social Development: What reports has she received on the Government’s Youth Service?
  6. METIRIA TUREI to the Minister responsible for HNZC: Does he stand by his statement that “I can commit to all public services involved with these families taking the steps that they ought to take to prevent as tragic an outcome as a death”?
  7. Hon PHIL GOFF to the Minister of Transport: Why has he rejected Auckland City’s transport strategy and its proposals to fund that strategy?
  8. IAN McKELVIE to the Minister for Primary Industries: What announcements has he made in Budget 2015 that will future-proof New Zealand’s biosecurity system?
  9. EUGENIE SAGE to the Minister for Primary Industries: Does he stand by his statement in regard to the export of swamp kauri, that “we manage it very, very closely”?
  10. CLARE CURRAN to the Minister for Māori Development: When he met with the Chief Executive of Māori Television in May, did he or his office discuss the planned Native Affairs debate on Whānau Ora?
  11. RON MARK to the Minister of Police: Does he believe that the Police are allowed to carry out their duties in a professional manner, and are able to deal with all New Zealanders equally?
  12. SCOTT SIMPSON to the Minister for Senior Citizens: What steps is the Government taking to combat elder abuse?

National: Four questions on economic growth, Government Youth Service, biosecurity and elder abuse.

Labour: Four questions on Auckland housing, MBIE expenditure, Auckland transport and Maori TV.

Greens: Two questions on cold housing and swamp Kauri.

NZ First: Two questions on electricity and Police

Questions to Members

  1. IAIN LEES-GALLOWAY to the Chairperson of the Transport and Industrial Relations Committee: Does he intend to call for further submissions on the Health and Safety Reform Bill before it is reported back to the House?

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm and 7.30 pm to 10.00 pm

Appropriation (2014/15 Supplementary Estimates) Bill – second reading

This bill seeks parliamentary authorisation of the individual appropriations and changes contained in The Supplementary Estimates of Appropriations for the Government of New Zealand for the year ending 30 June 2015

The second reading is a debate of 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes for a maximum of two hours.

Exclusive Economic Zone and Continental Shelf (Environmental Effects) (Transitional Provisions) Amendment Bill – committee stage

The bill amends the Exclusive Economic Zone and Continental Shelf (Environmental Effects) Act 2012 (the EEZ Act) to overcome unintended effects of Section 162 of by allowing existing petroleum operators who have applied for a marine consent to continue their operations until the application is decided and any subsequent objections or appeals are determined.

  • Introduced: February 2015
  • 1st reading: February 2015, passed 106-13 with Greens against
  • SC report: May 2015, supported without dissent with amendments
  • 2nd reading: June 2015

The committee stage has no set time limit but it is a very small bill, so is unlikely to be much more than an hour.

Environmental Reporting Bill – committee stage continued

The bill provides for independent environmental reports in the areas of air, climate and atmosphere, freshwater, marine and land.

  • Introduced February 2014
  • 1st reading: March 2014, passed 78 to 41 with Labour and NZ First opposed
  • Select Committee report: March 2015, supported with amendments by the majority, minority views by Labour and Greens
  • 2nd reading: May 2015, passed 61 to 60 with Labour, Greens, NZ First and Maori Party opposed

There is no time limit for the committee stage. It has two parts so is likely to last for at least two hours.  There is one SOP from Eugenie Sage.

New Zealand Superannuation and Retirement Income Amendment Bill – committee stage

The bill amends the New Zealand Superannuation and Retirement Income Act 2011 to facilitate the efficient and effective investment of the New Zealand Superannuation Fund by allowing the Guardians to control entities formed for the purpose of holding, facilitating, or managing the investments of the Fund.

  • Introduced: November 2013
  • 1st reading: March 2014, passed unanimously
  • SC report: July 2014, supported with amendments without dissent
  • 2nd reading: May 2015, passed 101-13 with Greens against

There is no time limit for the committee stage. It has two parts so is likely to last for at least two hours.  There are two SOPs from Bill English

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Parliament 16 June 2015

June 16th, 2015 at 12:14 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. Dr PARMJEET PARMAR to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received showing how New Zealand’s broad-based economic growth is leading most other OECD countries?
  2. METIRIA TUREI to the Minister responsible for HNZC: Does he accept the coroner’s finding that the Housing New Zealand home in which Emma-Lita Bourne lived may have contributed to the pneumonia-like illness that Emma-Lita was suffering at the time of her death?
  3. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Is he satisfied with his Minister of Building and Housing’s handling of the issue of cold and damp rental properties, in light of his statement that “people dying in winter of pneumonia and other illnesses is not new”?
  4. NUK KORAKO to the Minister of Science and Innovation: How is the Government encouraging the development of innovative new businesses in Canterbury?
  5. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements regarding the Saudi farm deal; if so, why?
  6. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he have confidence in his Minister of Building and Housing; if so, why?
  7. ALFRED NGARO to the Minister for Building and Housing:How many new houses have been completed at Hobsonville Point and how many more are now planned with the Government announcement to speed up the development?
  8. Hon NANAIA MAHUTA to the Minister of Education: Does she have confidence in the process undertaken by the Te Kohanga Reo National Trust Board to determine whether they acted in a responsible and accountable manner in their oversight of Te Pataka Ohanga?
  9. PITA PARAONE to the Minister for Māori Development: Has he undertaken any discussions or consultation with any other Ministers regarding surplus Crown land in Auckland, which is the subject of potential legal action by Ngāti Whātua and Waikato-Tainui?
  10. MATT DOOCEY to the Minister of Transport: What updates can he provide on the delivery of the Government’s commitment to provide roading infrastructure to support economic growth?
  11. Hon DAVID PARKER to the Minister of Foreign Affairs: What were the names of the “interested Saudi parties” who participated in the evaluation of the tender proposals for the model farm in the Saudi Arabian desert, and how were they related, if at all, to the Al Khalaf Group who received the first $4 million payment referred to in his Cabinet paper dated 13 February 2013?
  12. Dr RUSSEL NORMAN to the Minister for Climate Change Issues: Does he agree with the finding in the latest Mercer climate investment report that “New Zealand is the most vulnerable of the developed market sovereign bonds, due to a higher proportion of the population living in low-lying areas, as well as a higher dependence of national GDP on the agriculture sector”; if so, has he received any advice or information on the economic impacts of climate change in the last 12 months?

National: Four questions on economic growth, innovation in Canterbury, Auckland housing and roading

Labour: Four questions on cold houses, Minister of Building and Housing confidence, Te Kohanga Reo, and the Saudi Arabia farm.

Greens: Two questions on cold housing and climate change

NZ First: Two questions on the Saudi Arabia farm and Iwi claims over Auckland housing

Government Bills 3.00 pm to 6.00 pm

Appropriation (2014/15 Supplementary Estimates) Bill – first reading

This bill seeks parliamentary authorisation of the individual appropriations and changes contained in The Supplementary Estimates of Appropriations for the Government of New Zealand for the year ending 30 June 2015

The first reading is not debated.

Tariff (Free Trade Agreement between New Zealand and the Republic of Korea) Amendment Bill – first reading

The bill is to amends the Tariff Act 1988 to enable the implementation of the Free Trade Agreement between New Zealand and the Republic of Korea done at Seoul, Korea.

  • Introduced – June 2015

The debate is 12 speeches of up to 10 minutes for a maximum of two hours.

Exclusive Economic Zone and Continental Shelf (Environmental Effects) (Transitional Provisions) Amendment Bill – second reading continued

The bill amends the Exclusive Economic Zone and Continental Shelf (Environmental Effects) Act 2012 (the EEZ Act) to overcome unintended effects of Section 162 of by allowing existing petroleum operators who have applied for a marine consent to continue their operations until the application is decided and any subsequent objections or appeals are determined.

  • Introduced: February 2015
  • 1st reading: February 2015, passed 106-13 with Greens against
  • SC report: May 2015, supported without dissent with amendments

The debate has speeches of up to 10 minutes for a maximum of 70 minutes

Social Assistance (Portability to Cook Islands, Niue, and Tokelau) Bill – committee stage

This bill allows eligible persons who reside in the Cook Islands, Niue, or Tokelau to be able to apply from either of those countries or from that territory for New Zealand superannuation or a veteran’s pension.

  • Introduced: July 2014
  • 1st reading: November 2014, passed unanimously
  • Select committee report: March 2015, supported unanimously by the Social Services Committee, but with minority reports from Labour and NZ First calling for more generous eligibility
  • 2nd reading: May 2015, passed unanimously

There is no time limit for the committee stage. As it is a simple bill with broad support it should not take much time. There is one SOP from Winston Peters.

Environmental Reporting Bill – committee stage

The bill provides for independent environmental reports in the areas of air, climate and atmosphere, freshwater, marine and land.

  • Introduced February 2014
  • 1st reading: March 2014, passed 78 to 41 with Labour and NZ First opposed
  • Select Committee report: March 2015, supported with amendments by the majority, minority views by Labour and Greens
  • 2nd reading: May 2015, passed 61 to 60 with Labour, Greens, NZ First and Maori Party opposed

There is no time limit for the committee stage. It has two parts so is likely to last for at least two hours.  There is one SOP from Eugenie Sage.

 

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Parliament 4 June 2015

June 4th, 2015 at 11:54 am by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. METIRIA TUREI to the Minister for Climate Change Issues:Does she agree that local authorities will face greater adaptation costs and find it more expensive to protect infrastructure and property as the climate changes; if not, why not?
  2. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: What recent reports has he received this year on access to rural health services?
  3. ANDREW BAYLY to the Minister of Finance: As part of the Government’s wider economic plan, how will Budget 2015 help families and businesses in New Zealand’s regions?
  4. PITA PARAONE to the Minister for Māori Development: Does he stand by his statement, “Ngāti Whātua has offered up a number of options to the Crown and we expect the Crown to deal with them in good faith”?
  5. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Did he promise to spend $1 billion on education and $1 billion on health from the Future Investment Fund; if so, is there enough money not yet committed in the Future Investment Fund to keep his promise?
  6. MATT DOOCEY to the Minister for Social Development: How will Budget 2015 help the Government meet its Better Public Services target to reduce the number of people on benefits?
  7. DENISE ROCHE to the Minister of Immigration: Will he increase New Zealand’s annual refugee quota from the current 750; if not, why not?
  8. MARK MITCHELL to the Minister of Transport: What update can he give on the Government’s Pūhoi to Wellsford Road of National Significance?
  9. PHIL TWYFORD to the Minister for Building and Housing: Can he confirm he intends to redesignate land held for transport and education as “land that is held for state housing purposes” so that under section 136 of the Ngā Mana Whenua o Tāmaki Makaurau Collective Redress Act 2014 he can circumvent the right of iwi to first right of refusal under treaty settlements?
  10. CLAYTON MITCHELL to the Minister of Internal Affairs: Does he stand by all his statements regarding the Fire Service?
  11. MELISSA LEE to the Minister of Education: What recent appointments has she made that will support quality teaching and leadership to deliver high-quality education for New Zealand children?
  12. Hon DAVID PARKER to the Minister for Primary Industries: Is the Customs Export Prohibition (Livestock for Slaughter) Order 2013 still in force and how does it differ, other than as to dates, from the Customs Export Prohibition (Livestock for Slaughter) Order 2010 and the Customs Export Prohibition (Livestock for Slaughter) Order 2007?

National: Four questions on Budget 2015 x 2, Puhoi to Wellsford Road and EDUCANZ

Labour: Four questions on rural health, Future Investment Fund, Auckland housing and the Saudi Arabia farm.

Greens: Two questions on climate change and refugees

NZ First: Two questions on Auckland housing and the Fire Service

Government Notice of Motion 3.00 pm to 4.10 pm

 

Hon Bill English to move, That, pursuant to section 161(2) of the Reserve Bank of New Zealand Act 1989, the House ratify the funding agreement entered into by the Minister of Finance and the Governor of the Reserve Bank of New Zealand pursuant to section 159 of that Act on 26 May 2015 and presented to the House on 3 June 2015.

Each party gets one speech of up to 10 minutes, so a total debate of up to 70 minutes

Government Bills 4.10 pm to 6.00 pm

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Members’ Bills Ballot 4 June 2015

June 4th, 2015 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

As a members’ bill was passed last night, there will be a ballot today for a new bill to be introduced. The draw is at midday.

Below are the bills in the ballot currently. I’ll update after midday with the winner.

Bill Title Member Name
1 Affordable Healthcare Bill Barbara Stewart
2 Age of Majority (Attainment at 18 Years) Amendment Bill Brett Hudson
3 Better Public Service Target Results Independent Audit Bill Tracey Martin
4 Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill Dr Jian Yang
5 Buy New Zealand (Procurement) Bill Richard Prosser
6 Care of Children (Adoption and Surrogacy Law Reform) Amendment Bill Kevin Hague
7 Charter Schools (Application of Official Information and Ombudsmen Acts) Bill Hon Nanaia Mahuta
8 Child Poverty Reduction and Eradication Bill Jacinda Ardern
9 Children, Young Persons, and Their Families (Parent’s and Guardian’s Responsibility) Amendment Bill Barbara Kuriger
10 Climate Change (Divestment from Fossil Fuels) Bill Dr Russel Norman
11 Climate Change Response (National Emissions Reduction) Amendment Bill Julie Anne Genter
12 Commerce (Supermarket Adjudicator and Code of Conduct) Amendment Bill Steffan Browning
13 Credit Contracts and Consumer Finance (Break Fees Disclosure) Amendment Bill Kanwaljit Singh Bakshi
14 Crimes (Corporate Manslaughter) Amendment Bill Andrew Little
15 Crimes (Non-fatal Strangulation) Amendment Bill Kelvin Davis
16 Criminal Procedure (Removing Paedophile Name Suppression) Amendment Bill Pita Paraone
17 Crown Minerals (Protection of World Heritage Sites) Amendment Bill Hon Ruth Dyson
18 Customs and Excise (Prohibition of Imports Made by Slave Labour) Amendment Bill Peeni Henare
19 Domestic Violence—Victims’ Protection Bill Jan Logie
20 Education (Charter Schools Abolition) Amendment Bill Chris Hipkins
21 Education (Charter Schools Curriculum) Amendment Bill Hon Phil Goff
22 Education (Charter Schools Teacher Quality) Amendment Bill Louisa Wall
23 Education (Public Good not Profit from Charter Schools) Amendment Bill Dr David Clark
24 Education (Restoration of Democracy to University Councils) Amendment Bill Hon David Cunliffe
25 Electricity Industry (Energy Efficiency) Amendment Bill Rino Tirikatene
26 Electricity Industry (Small-Scale Renewable Distributed Generation) Amendment Bill Gareth Hughes
27 Electricity Transparency Bill David Shearer
28 Employment Relations (Allowing Higher Earners to Contract Out of Personal Grievance Provisions) Amendment Bill Scott Simpson
29 Employment Relations (Certainty at Work) Amendment Bill Iain Lees-Galloway
30 Employment Relations (Restoring Kiwis’ Right to a Break at Work) Amendment Bill Jenny Salesa
31 Employment Relations (Safe and Healthy Workplaces) Amendment Bill Alastair Scott
32 Energy Efficiency and Conservation (Warm Healthy Rentals Warrant of Fitness) Amendment Bill Metiria Turei
33 Environment Canterbury (Democracy Restoration) Amendment Bill Dr Megan Woods
34 Equal Pay Amendment Bill Mojo Mathers
35 Family Proceedings (Paternity Orders and Parentage Tests) Amendment Bill Jacqui Dean
36 Financial Assistance for Live Organ Donors Bill Chris Bishop
37 Independent Prison Inspectorate Bill David Clendon
38 International Non-Aggression and the Lawful Use of Force Bill Dr Kennedy Graham
39 Keep Kiwibank Bill Hon Clayton Cosgrove
40 Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary Establishment Bill Eugenie Sage
41 Kiwi Jobs Bill Hon Damien O’Connor
42 Land Transfer (Foreign Ownership of Land Register) Amendment Bill Mahesh Bindra
43 Life Jackets for Children and Young Persons Bill Alfred Ngaro
44 Local Government (Four Well-beings) Amendment Bill Su’a William Sio
45 Local Government (Freedom of Access) Amendment Bill Paul Foster-Bell
46 Local Government Act 2002 (Greater Local Democracy) Amendment Bill Stuart Nash
47 Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill Joanne Hayes
48 Minimum Wage (Contractor Remuneration) Amendment Bill Hon David Parker
49 New Zealand Public Health and Disability (Change of Electoral System for District Health Boards) Amendment Bill Simon O’Connor
50 New Zealand Superannuation and Retirement Income (Pro Rata Entitlement) Amendment Bill Denis O’Rourke
51 Nurse Practitioners Bill Hon Annette King
52 Oaths and Declarations (Endorsing the Principles of the Treaty of Waitangi) Amendment Bill Marama Fox
53 Oaths and Declarations (Members of Parliament) Amendment Bill Meka Whaitiri
54 Official Information (Parliamentary Under-Secretaries) Amendment Bill Adrian Rurawhe
55 Overseas Investment (Protection of New Zealand Homebuyers) Amendment Bill Phil Twyford
56 Parental Leave and Employment Protection (Six Months’ Paid Leave and Work Contact Hours) Amendment Bill Sue Moroney
57 Private International Law (Choice of Law in Tort) Bill David Bennett
58 Public Collections and Solicitations (Disclosure of Payment) Bill Matt Doocey
59 Public Finance (Sustainable Development Indicators) Amendment Bill James Shaw
60 Public Works (Prohibition of Compulsory Acquisition of Māori Land) Amendment Bill Catherine Delahunty
61 Radiocommunications (Enhanced Public Broadcasting Provision) Amendment Bill Kris Faafoi
62 Receiverships (Agricultural Debt Mediation) Amendment Bill Ron Mark
63 Sentencing (Domestic Violence) Amendment Bill Poto Williams
64 Sentencing (Livestock Rustling) Amendment Bill Ian McKelvie
65 Shop Trading Hours Act Repeal (Shopping Centre Opening Hours) Amendment Bill Hon Trevor Mallard
66 Social Security (Apprenticeship Assistance for Youth) Amendment Bill Grant Robertson
67 Social Security (Pathway to Work) Amendment Bill Carmel Sepuloni
68 Social Security (Stopping Benefit Payments for Offenders who Repeatedly Fail to Comply with Community Sentences) Amendment Bill Mark Mitchell
69 Summary Offences (Drink or Drugs Affecting Behaviour) Amendment Bill Clayton Mitchell
70 Summary Proceedings (Warrant for Detention Conditions) Amendment Bill Jonathan Young
71 Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Amendment Bill Clare Curran
72 Vulnerable Children (Mandatory Social Worker Registration) Amendment Bill Darroch Ball
73 Waitemata Harbour Protection Bill Rt Hon Winston Peters
74 Waste Minimisation (Television Product Stewardship) Amendment Bill Denise Roche

The bills by party (Ministers excluded) are:

  • National – 17/34
  • Labour – 32/32
  • Greens – 14/14
  • NZ First -10/12
  • Maori – 1/1
  • ACT – 0/1

Only half the National backbench have a bill in the ballot. That’s pretty slack.

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The 2nd floor doors

June 3rd, 2015 at 2:00 pm by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

The skirmishing over a set of doors between Labour and National MPs’ offices has broken out again with each blaming the other for the dividing wall across what had become known as Parliament’s “demilitarised zone”.

With work on the doorway due to start soon, National backbencher Judith Collins on Tuesday tweeted: “Sad that@nzlabour has insisted on $50k doors between Lab & Nat MPs on Parlt’s 2nd floor.”

But Labour senior whip Chris Hipkins denied “insisting” on the doors, saying it was part of the original agreement between the two parties.

And a spokeswoman for Parliamentary Service said that while the actual cost of the door was not yet known, “it would almost certainly be less than $50,000″. 

The double doors bring to an end a detente originally hammered out between Collins and Labour’s Annette King after the election when Labour’s shrinking caucus forced a shared area in the old Parliament Buildings.

Under the deal the two sides agreed to use lifts, toilets, a kitchen and staircases “behind enemy lines”, on the understanding that no-one strayed into each other’s offices without permission.

Hipkins said that agreement was only temporary and the doors were Leader of the House Gerry Brownlee’s idea, which he proposed when the offices were divvied up.

“If Judith would like to give up her office … we would be more than happy to take it back. But the doors were put in so that Judith could get the office she wanted in the corner,” Hipkins said.

 

National and Labour MPs are sharing a floor, because Labour has so few MPs they no longer covered the whole floor. All you need is an agreement that you respect each other’s offices and don’y go wondering in without permission.

The National MPs on that floor have said that they are fine with that approach.

It is Labour which has insisted on putting the doors in. They have been asked many times to drop the demand, but they refuse. So the result is up to $50,000 being spent on a new set of doors.

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Parliament 3 June 2015

June 3rd, 2015 at 12:00 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: When he said that part of the reason for paying $4 million of taxpayer money to a Saudi business was “wanting to resolve the issues that were holding back the Gulf States free-trade agreement”; what were those issues and why did he think paying Hamood Al Ali Al Khalaf’s company $4 million would help resolve them?
  2. STUART SMITH to the Minister of Finance: How is the Government’s economic plan continuing to support the most vulnerable New Zealanders while at the same time encouraging economic growth?
  3. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Minister for Senior Citizens:When can my office expect a response to the letter sent to her on 27 May 2015 regarding SuperGold Card concessions?
  4. PHIL TWYFORD to the Minister for Building and Housing: Did he consult Auckland iwi on his plan to use vacant Government-owned land for private housing developments before he made the announcement on 21 May?
  5. Hon JUDITH COLLINS to the Minister of Science and Innovation: How does Budget 2015 support research and innovation in regional areas?
  6. JAMES SHAW to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his answer to a supplementary question yesterday about carbon emissions that “A target of a 40 percent reduction on 1990 levels would be disastrous for the New Zealand economy”?
  7. CHRIS HIPKINS to the Minister of Education: Does she stand by her statement that national standards data has been “remarkably consistent”; if so, why?
  8. DENIS O’ROURKE to the Minister of Transport: Does he intend to fully implement the Ten Year Turnaround Plan for KiwiRail announced by Hon Steven Joyce in 2010, to get rail working for all New Zealand, to have all modes of transport working to complement each other, and priced appropriately so importers and exporters have clear choices?
  9. JACQUI DEAN to the Minister of Local Government: What progress is being made by the Government’s Rules Reduction Taskforce?
  10. Dr DAVID CLARK to the Minister for Economic Development: Does the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment’s expenditure of $43,000 on a sign show it is achieving one of its principal goals of realising efficiency gains over time?
  11. Dr KENNEDY GRAHAM to the Acting Attorney-General: Will the terms of reference of the New Zealand security and intelligence review be amended to reflect the views of other legislatures, which are protecting civil liberties, including the United States Congress, which yesterday passed the Freedom Act to end mass collection of American phone records?
  12. BRETT HUDSON to the Minister of Internal Affairs: What recent announcements has he made in regard to New Zealand’s Fire Services?

National: Four questions on the economy, Budget 2015, the Rules Reduction Taskforce and NZ Fire Service

Labour: Four questions on the Saudi Arabia farm, Auckland housing, national standards and the MBIE sign

Greens: Two questions on climate change and spying

NZ First: Two questions on SuperGold Card and KiwiRail

General Debate 3.00 pm to 3.00 pm

The general debate consists of 12 speeches of up to five minutes each, so a maximum of one hour.

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Parliament 2 June 2015

June 2nd, 2015 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

The order paper is here.

Oral Questions 2.00 pm – 3.00 pm

  1. JOANNE HAYES to the Minister of Finance: What reports has he received about the economy’s performance in the lead-up to the Budget last month?
  2. JAMES SHAW to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements?
  3. ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Did he approve of Minister McCully’s dealings with the Saudi Arabian businessman Hamood Al Ali Al Khalaf?
  4. Dr SHANE RETI to the Minister of Health: How will social bonds help deliver better health outcomes?
  5. JAN LOGIE to the Minister of Health: Can he guarantee no NGO that embarks on a social bond contract, in order to assist people with the most complex mental health needs into work, will go under as a result of not meeting agreed targets; if not, why not?
  6. Hon ANNETTE KING to the Minister of Health: What advice, if any, did he receive on the “Better Public Services Seed Funding: Social Bonds Pilots”?
  7. DAVID SEYMOUR to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement in the House last week that because New Zealand Superannuation costs are currently less than 5 percent of GDP, and are forecast to rise to 8 percent of GDP by 2060, this represents a responsible path for overall Government spending?
  8. ALFRED NGARO to the Minister for Building and Housing: What response has he received from Auckland Council and housing companies to the Auckland Crown land programme launched on Friday?
  9. GRANT ROBERTSON to the Minister of Finance: Does he stand by his statement in Budget 2014 “the share sale proceeds saw $4.7 billion go to the Future Investment Fund and we said we would spend $1 billion of that on schools, and a further $1 billion on health”; if so, as at Budget 2015 how much has been allocated to health and education from the Future Investment Fund?
  10. JONATHAN YOUNG to the Minister of Transport: How is the Government supporting the delivery of its Transport priorities?
  11. Rt Hon WINSTON PETERS to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by all his statements with regard to Northland?
  12. CHRIS HIPKINS to the Minister of Education: Does she stand by her statement that “the Government is fully funding the delivery of the school curriculum”?

National: Four questions on the economy, social bonds, Auckland housing and transport.

Labour: Four questions on the Saudi Arabia farm, social bonds, asset sales and school funding

Greens: Two questions on does PM stand by all his statements and social bonds

NZ First: One question on Northland

ACT: One question on superannuation costs

Budget Debate 3.00 pm to 5.00 pm

The Budget debate has one hours and 54 minutes remaining of the 15 hours allocated. They should get through 5.5 hours today. Each remaining MP can speak for up to 10 minutes, and the Minister of Finance has a final 10 minute right of reply.

Technically it is the second reading of the Appropriation (2015/16 Estimates) Bill.

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Ejections from House at record low

May 28th, 2015 at 3:00 pm by David Farrar

As I blogged earlier, Winston was complaining that opposition MPs have been getting thrown out of the House more than Government MPs, and somehow blamed the Speaker for this. In fact half of the 31 evictions have been him and Trevor Mallard, and most of the remaining 15 were National MPs. So we know once again Winston was speaking crap.

I’ve now got data for all ejections from 1999 onwards. What is amazing is how few ejections have occurred, compared to the past. Here’s the data:

  • 1999 – 21
  • 2000 – 31
  • 2001 – 14
  • 2002 – 21
  • 2003 – 54
  • 2004 – 33
  • 2005 – 32
  • 2006 – 41
  • 2007 – 31
  • 2008 – 10
  • 2009 – 2
  • 2010 – 4
  • 2011 – 4
  • 2012 – 6
  • 2013 – 4
  • 2014 – 8
  • 2015 – 2

So Speakers are ejecting far far fewer MPs than in the past. Here’s the total per Speaker, and average per year from 1999 on.

  • Doug Kidd – 21, 21/year
  • Jonathan Hunt – 153, 29/year
  • Margaret Wilson – 109, 29/year
  • Lockwood Smith – 17, 4/year
  • David Carter – 14, 6/year

And the proportions for each Speaker

  • Doug Kidd – 57% Labour, 24% NZ First, 14% National
  • Jonathan Hunt – 34% National, 34% Labour, 17% ACT, 11% NZ First
  • Margaret Wilson – 63% National, 20% Labour, 9% ACT
  • Lockwood Smith – 41% Labour, 35% National, 18% NZ First
  • David Carter – 50% Labour, 21% National, 21% NZ First

And since 1999, who has been ejected the most?

  1. Trevor Mallard 26
  2. Nick Smith 25
  3. Winston Peters 23
  4. Rodney Hide 23
  5. Gerry Brownlee 17
  6. Chris Carter 13
  7. Tau Henare 13
  8. Phil Heatley 10
  9. Bill English 9
  10. Ron Mark 9
  11. David Cunliffe 6
  12. Dover Samuels 6
  13. Wayne Mapp 6
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